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Author Topic: How to edit msconfig?  (Read 1278 times)

Contro

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How to edit msconfig?
« on: May 23, 2021, 04:39 PM »
How can i edit the msconfig from outside the system with a cd/dvd or pendrive ?

https://www.donation...?topic=51422.new#new

I have lost the PIN or password initial session because I inhabilitate all services in the msconfig.
After i enter in safe mode with the option Active Directory Repair . No login window at all.

What can I do now ?

Shades

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Re: Edit msconfig under windows 10
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2021, 09:50 PM »
1) Any Windows PE-based pendrive/DVD should provide you with a somewhat limited Windows environment that allows you to edit files from the broken Windows installation on your hard disk. Don't think these are free. But sure are the most convenient.

2) You can also download a Linux distribution iso. Burn that to pendrive/dvd and boot the problematic computer from that. In the setup routine there is always an option to "test drive" the distribution from pendrive/dvd. Select that option and mount the hard disk from the problematic computer. Then try and edit the broken content in files using Linux tools. Most distributions know how to handle files stored on NTFS based partitions and FAT32 partitions by default.   

3) If you had previously installed software like AnyDesk/NoMachine/DWService on this PC (as a background service) you would have had the option to access files on your hard disk from a remote computer (in your LAN or through the internet). This is not a very safe solution, but in principle it works for editing files.

4) Is your computer part of an Active Directory setup?
If yes, please ask the administrator to fix the problem for you.
If not, what were you thinking? Now you have set yourself up for a big failure and most likely a re-install of Windows.

5) There is another way and it leads through a legally gray area:
You can use either your own Windows installation media, the Windows PE or Linux pendrive/dvd to boot the problematic computer. If you don't have your Windows installation media at hand, there are many detailed instructions on how to do this (for free) using the Microsoft website and tools.

If you chose to boot from Windows PE or Linux, use the file navigator to access folder: Windows -> System32    rename 'login.exe' to 'login.original.exe', then copy 'cmd.exe' to 'login.exe'. Reboot the computer. After the reboot finishes, you end it in a DOS prompt. You can now start msconfig using the command line and undo whatever you did previously. When done, delete 'login.exe', rename 'login.original.exe' to 'login.exe' and reboot the computer. You should now have your login screen back. If you don't, there is likely an ACL (Access Control List) mishap going on in your system. You'll need to redo the steps from this paragraph and troubleshoot any ACL mishap from the command-line. Not nice at all, but that is what you'll have to do. Can take a minute, can take the whole day. Your guess is as good as mine.

If you chose to boot from your Windows installation media, you can start the installation procedure and at the first step, hit keys: <SHIFT> + <F10>. You will get a command prompt, where you can to access folder: Windows -> System32    rename 'login.exe' to 'login.original.exe', then copy 'cmd.exe' to 'login.exe'.  If you can't, the first thing to check is to see if the command line window has been executed as administrator or not. And if it did start as Administrator and you still can't copy/rename files, there is most likely an ACL (Access Control List) mishap going on in your system. Well, have fun fixing those. Again, this can take a minute, but also the whole day. Anyone's guess.



On a side note:
Why did you conclude that it is a good idea to disable all (background) services from Windows/Microsoft? These services are there for a reason. Most, if not all, very necessary for Windows to function at all.

Contro

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Re: Edit msconfig under windows 10
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2021, 03:53 AM »
1) Any Windows PE-based pendrive/DVD should provide you with a somewhat limited Windows environment that allows you to edit files from the broken Windows installation on your hard disk. Don't think these are free. But sure are the most convenient.

2) You can also download a Linux distribution iso. Burn that to pendrive/dvd and boot the problematic computer from that. In the setup routine there is always an option to "test drive" the distribution from pendrive/dvd. Select that option and mount the hard disk from the problematic computer. Then try and edit the broken content in files using Linux tools. Most distributions know how to handle files stored on NTFS based partitions and FAT32 partitions by default.   

3) If you had previously installed software like AnyDesk/NoMachine/DWService on this PC (as a background service) you would have had the option to access files on your hard disk from a remote computer (in your LAN or through the internet). This is not a very safe solution, but in principle it works for editing files.

4) Is your computer part of an Active Directory setup?
If yes, please ask the administrator to fix the problem for you.
If not, what were you thinking? Now you have set yourself up for a big failure and most likely a re-install of Windows.

5) There is another way and it leads through a legally gray area:
You can use either your own Windows installation media, the Windows PE or Linux pendrive/dvd to boot the problematic computer. If you don't have your Windows installation media at hand, there are many detailed instructions on how to do this (for free) using the Microsoft website and tools.

If you chose to boot from Windows PE or Linux, use the file navigator to access folder: Windows -> System32    rename 'login.exe' to 'login.original.exe', then copy 'cmd.exe' to 'login.exe'. Reboot the computer. After the reboot finishes, you end it in a DOS prompt. You can now start msconfig using the command line and undo whatever you did previously. When done, delete 'login.exe', rename 'login.original.exe' to 'login.exe' and reboot the computer. You should now have your login screen back. If you don't, there is likely an ACL (Access Control List) mishap going on in your system. You'll need to redo the steps from this paragraph and troubleshoot any ACL mishap from the command-line. Not nice at all, but that is what you'll have to do. Can take a minute, can take the whole day. Your guess is as good as mine.

If you chose to boot from your Windows installation media, you can start the installation procedure and at the first step, hit keys: <SHIFT> + <F10>. You will get a command prompt, where you can to access folder: Windows -> System32    rename 'login.exe' to 'login.original.exe', then copy 'cmd.exe' to 'login.exe'.  If you can't, the first thing to check is to see if the command line window has been executed as administrator or not. And if it did start as Administrator and you still can't copy/rename files, there is most likely an ACL (Access Control List) mishap going on in your system. Well, have fun fixing those. Again, this can take a minute, but also the whole day. Anyone's guess.



On a side note:
Why did you conclude that it is a good idea to disable all (background) services from Windows/Microsoft? These services are there for a reason. Most, if not all, very necessary for Windows to function at all.
I think I have everything somewhere....

1. I remember use windows PE-based DVD sometimes. And I think they were free. I don't remember well.
2. I have used linux distributions in the past, specially ubuntu. I have some virtual machines under virtualbox and I remember to have some disks too I have to find.
3. No. I haven't
4. I don't even know what is an Active Directory. I mark this option in the boot setup in safe mode experimenting.
The only care I think I did good is a previous acronis image before all modifications. So probably , if necessary, I will have a copy of the system in the present state before apply the Active Directory option.
5. I think this is a good way too.

Your answer have been splendid Shades.

At the present moment I think locate a windows PE disk to boot may be a good solution. And try to edit the msconfig file to unmark the active directory option and habilitate the services from the safe boot.

What is the service that control the login page and options ?

Best Regards



Contro

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Re: Edit msconfig under windows 10
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2021, 03:55 AM »
Shades I suppose dissabling the services will help me to locate the conflictive driver.

How can I do this then ?

Best Regards

https://www.donation...?topic=51422.new#new
Here you have the list of all drivers installed in the conflictive restored pc
 :-* :P

Contro

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Edit msconfig from hiren's boot pe or from the bios ?
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2021, 09:39 AM »
How can I edit the msconfig from the pc desktop system windows 10 home ?

I can't enter the system, so I need to edit the msconfig to restore the values and enter in normal mode. Restore some services too.

How can I do this ?
 :-* :P