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Messages - wraith808 [ switch to compact view ]

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1
Living Room / Re: Free eBooks
« on: Today at 10:21 AM »
Is the email you attempted to use a free account?  I'm submitting a support request to get them to at least respond... and to find out if it is legal to redistribute them since it seems that some will not be able to get them directly if this isn't just an oversight.

2
;D  Gotta love GDPR eh.
-Stephen66515 (May 24, 2018, 05:30 PM)

No.  Not at all.  :down:

As a law, it's pretty decent - applying it to a business....pain in the ass :P
-Stephen66515 (May 24, 2018, 09:55 PM)

It's not even decent as a law.  It's not well explained (all of these e-mails about consent might actually be illegal under the GDPR, and useless as they don't require you to re-obtain consent, but the law is so murky that this isn't relevant), and really only good for people that are implementing it for companies, IMO.

3
Living Room / Re: Free eBooks
« on: May 24, 2018, 10:00 PM »
I was already signed up... and not with a work address, which I guess is the reason I'd not noticed that you have to sign up with a work e-mail address.  I've not gotten anything from them after doing so other than notifications of new e-books, not that this fact makes it any less of a problem.

UPDATE: Did you mean the company field?  I just fudged that looking at my account.

4
;D  Gotta love GDPR eh.
-Stephen66515 (May 24, 2018, 05:30 PM)

No.  Not at all.  :down:

5
Living Room / Re: Free eBooks
« on: May 24, 2018, 10:15 AM »
Syncfusion releases abbreviated but thorough explanations of technologies in their appropriately named Succinctly series.

https://www.syncfusion.com/ebooks

They have an app to manage the books, but you can download each separately.  I've read the Git, Github, Docker, Statistics Fundamentals, Unity Game Development, Webhooks, and others.  They're in general around 100 pages, and get to the specifics instead of walking you into it, so might not be suitable for complete beginners, but have the fundamentals for those that have an aptitude for any similar subjects.

6
Mini-Reviews by Members / Re: GS-Base Mini-Review
« on: May 22, 2018, 06:38 PM »
I think it's perfectly good as a database, and am still using it to record things for which I need to use such functionality.  It's a great deal for the price, and very functional, so I haven't really looked for anything else.

7
I might ask that question... it might be relevant for me.  The tool I'm working on will keep track of the lock, then open the db when there's no lock, query for the filenames, then use pandoc to get the files to markdown from rtf (or word I suppose).  After I got that working, I was going to look into the best way to sync them back.

As I said, I like using Sublime Text and Writemonkey at times, so being able to work on them in plain text also will be key for me.

8
I took it from The Atomic Scribbler Blog
There are two key folders inside the project folder: Documents and .atomic. The Documents folder contains a series of documents in Word and RTF formats, each with a number for a name (12.docx, 87.rtf, etc.). When you create a new scene or note, a document is created in this folder to store the contents of that scene. And the best part is, as the formats Atomic uses (Word and RTF) are so common, you can open any of these small documents with Word or any other word processor. Your work is never stored in a proprietary format and can always be recovered — even if Atomic Scribbler is not on the scene.
If it's not that, I have no idea why it feels a little slower than I see with other similar programs. If that's something you don't see, then it must presumably be a system variable.


I've been working pretty extensively with that folder, and haven't seen any docx files.  Perhaps they're used for a function that I just don't use - like the notepane.

9
They are rtf documents, not word documents which are by far simpler in format.

Scrivener saves in the same format.

10
I'm using it with multiple sections of a larger novel, and haven't experienced the slowdown that you mention.  Have you put your problem on the forum?  He's very responsive as I mentioned. 

The abandonment of Page Four was to transition to this from his own admission.  I guess I just view the past in a more favorable light.  He's never hidden it, nor merely abandoned, so I don't view it as a negative in his case.

11
Idle offtopic wish: That the at-sign did actually signal you in some way on this forum...  it would definitely be a help to bring people into a conversation or signal the person.

It's become somewhat of a habit for me to do that, due to using a Discourse forum at work. (but I still hate Discourse and prefer SMF)

Maybe mouser can add a plugin for mentions?

I added a feature request for it (it is also one of the few things that I like from Discourse - the other being likes and automatic image grabs/expansions)

12
Site/Forum Features / Feature Request
« on: May 21, 2018, 04:52 PM »
Not sure how feasible this is, but it came up in another thread, and I at least thought I throw it out there:

Would it be possible to make the at-sign actually signal you in some way on this forum...  it would definitely be a help to bring people into a conversation or signal the person that they were being referred to in a thread.

13
That was the approach I was thinking also Deo. 

Idle offtopic wish: That the at-sign did actually signal you in some way on this forum...  it would definitely be a help to bring people into a conversation or signal the person.

14
I have now done the table for Atomic Scribbler. I found it attractive, but it felt like a light program, and I'm not sure how it would stand up to a lengthy or heavy piece of work; this impression may be false. Some irritations, and felt a little slow.

I'm not sure about future development. It has just been made free with only the SmartEdit add-on providing an income for the developer. He'd said that 92% of his SmartEdit sales came from the Word version and has just released SmartEdit Pro just for Word. There has to be a question of how much future development the income from Atomic Scribbler and its add-on will justify. The add-on for Atomic Scribbler is fairly basic, but a lot of self published books would have benefited from it.


https://www.atomicsc...ntroducingSmartEdit/

He addresses a lot of it in that post, and on the forums.  He's actively on the forums and soliciting improvements, and uses the application himself.  He was just dissatisfied at the adoption rate as a paid application.  I don't think the development of the program is at risk, personally.  And am looking at using it as the basis for a lot of my development because I quite like how open it is compared to Scrivener.  He's even provided me with help for a supporting application that I'm looking at developing to get items from his format into markdown for compatibility (especially as I use Sublime Text for a lot of my editing currently)

https://forum.atomicscribbler.com/

15
I submit the different sections and get redlining separate.
Having them as one document with sections would not be tenable.  At least for me. 
And submitting the one doc for redlines and keeping the comments relevant- not sure he would have appreciated that.  He seemed to appreciate having them segregated a lot more. 
I think that you've found that this is a structure that works best for you. There may be other ways, but this suits your thinking the best and makes you more productive.
That gives you a very specific set of needs; other people may find other ways of achieving the same result.


I fully get that, which was why I was asking.  I just never seem to write a whole work professionally- it's always parceled out in sections to different writers.

16
I did a 1500 word submission for one project, and still broke it up into multiple files- one for each scene in the document.  Having to have one long document is very hard to work with in my experience.

I'd rather have one interface where I can go from document to document in the same session.

And then there's the problem of formats... my client decided to have us submit over google docs, and google docs added in extra spaces, and completely messed up Word formatting, when it states that it imports Word documents.   

But yeah, having something that has references to all of the documents that make up a larger document that can be opened and edited independently has become key to me, since I started writing semi-professionally.
I understand the allure of a single program. But can be done separately.

You can do outlining separately. Even in a sticky or a mindmap, depending on your need. In a small, always on top, window.
Then you can write in anything. Even WriteMonkey will allow easy switching between sections.
What you lose is the automatic re-ordering when you change your outline.
I would always separate formatting from writing even if I intend to use the same program for both. The formatting stage is when I will stick all the files together as one document.

The issue of references and research is a little more complex.
  • Have they all be garnered for this particular piece of work?
  • Will you use them later?
  • Have they been selected from a much larger repository?
The first is much simpler.
But for any, you could just use OneNote (or other equivalent) and have a section or page for you project and have them available on that. And then do your writing on whatever you fancy.

You will note that I am separating the concept of a chunk of the work, from external references. I regard them differently, you may not need to.


I submit the different sections and get redlining separate.  They might not even intrinsically be a single subject, but just relate to each other in a generic way.  In one example, I was writing about separate experiences in different parts of the world- but all exist in the same world, so I have to reference each.  Having them as one document with sections would not be tenable.  At least for me.  And submitting the one doc for redlines and keeping the comments relevant- not sure he would have appreciated that.  He seemed to appreciate having them segregated a lot more. 

This isn't to say that I never use separate programs for certain tasks- I do.  But usually that is because of a limitation of what I'm writing in, rather than something that is more conducive to writing.  Always on top bugs me to no end.  If I do use them, then I segregate the screen for them, or put them on a separate screen.  Just my preference.

17
OneNote
Available in nearly all corporates that use Word.

One note doesn't work for me.  And I've tried.  Just not good for me in writing.

18
I don't know that I can comment on the advantages of a separate project manager without knowing the precise use you have in mind. If there is an integrated program that does it well for you, then it seems unlikely that a separate program will have any advantages.

When I say project manager, I mean something that manages the files in a document, if you don't want to have a monolithic document.  It also makes it easier for proofing.  I did a 1500 word submission for one project, and still broke it up into multiple files- one for each scene in the document.  Having to have one long document is very hard to work with in my experience.  Not sure if most feel the same way.  And having to deal with each of those documents separately is a pain also.  I'd rather have one interface where I can go from document to document in the same session.  It's the reason that I don't use vanilla word.  After my add-in stopped working in the latest version of Word (http://writingoutliner.com/), I tried to manage the documents in there, and Word lost a lot of work.  If I'd been more patient, perhaps it would have come back.  But I waited for 30 minutes, and it was still hung.  And it did it several times.  I found more lift in editing in chunks in Markdown, outputting to one HTML or PDF document, then pasting it into Word for the final formatting.  And then there's the problem of formats... my client decided to have us submit over google docs, and google docs added in extra spaces, and completely messed up Word formatting, when it states that it imports Word documents.  Now I'm just rambling. 

But yeah, having something that has references to all of the documents that make up a larger document that can be opened and edited independently has become key to me, since I started writing semi-professionally.

19
There are many advantages of integrated.
And many advantages of separate.

It would be nice to state these.  I apparently stepped on some toes stating it in such a plain way, and such was not my intent.  I've just never seen where other than writing in a dedicated fashion as a text editor that a separate one is useful in doing serious writing on a project.

I personally haven't experienced any advantages of a separate project manager to keep track of your work and have it in front of you.  And I've tried, so I'd like to see that use case set forth to truly evaluate it.  I've noticed that in most cases where it's not there, there is a separate add on or advancement (like writemonkey's) to add in project management.  I use notepad++ without, but then again, I don't open projects in it.

20

I think of writemonkey more as a strict editing tool rather than a writer's tool.  I use it alongside my writing tools- I love the distraction free writing, and the ability to play music while you're there.  But managing projects and such, I find that it falls flat.

Calling WriteMonkey an "editing tool" rather than a "writer's tool" is an unusual characterisation. You seem to be using the term "editing" in an idiosyncratic way.

To me WriteMonkey is very much a "writer's tool", as it focuses on one of the most important aspects of writing: the act of writing itself.

Once I'd written my text in WriteMonkey, then I might take it to MS Word or some other word processor to edit it, format it, and typeset it.

But even you say that you use WM for writing primarily, so maybe by "editing" you mean 'writing'.

As for lack of project management capability (presumably of writing projects), I don't see that as an absolute requirement for a writing software. I also have Scrivener, which has all the bells and whistles, but I find it too distracting and much prefer to do my writing in WriteMonkey.

P.S. What I'm trying to say is that there are myriad other task and project management tools out there that can be used to manage a writing project, so they don't necessarily need to be built into specialist writing software.




Perhaps I should have expanded, but I think that the rest of that statement puts into perspective what I mean by 'editing tool'.  Not like something like smartedit or prowritingaid, but a text editor, so I don't find it an unusual characterization, because that's what it is.  But as I said... I think.  And in my experience, I think that the project management is a task that for writing professionally, I've found that I need integrated.  I have to do several self referential checks within the software, so when I'm not just writing a self-contained work, which I've never had the opportunity to do since I've started doing it professionally, being able to easily reference the other work within that project is something that I need.  Not in an external tool, but right there.  This might not be the same for all, but for me, that's what I think and I need.  Which is the way that all of us reference these things, I think- even the creators in many cases.   A plain text editor won't cut it for me in most cases.

21
What I had noticed was that the ability to unlock and use some newly-updated/developed nifty MS Office functionality had sometimes been predicated on the user migrating from earlier versions of Windows to Windows 10 and/or OneDrive.
In other words, there was (apparently deliberately) no backwards compatibility, but it did not threaten to invalidate  existing licences. I had thought that this was probably nothing more than an incentive to urge users to the newer OS, but still, it did seem to smack of coercion and making existing/old licences seem to be obsolete.

Understanding programming and features in .NET, it could be perfectly valid based on features being available in supporting versions of the framework that weren't available in older operating systems and supporting programs.  They can't be expected to support old versions of their software forever.

22
DC Gamer Club / Re: Free Game on Humble Store
« on: May 19, 2018, 09:59 AM »
Forgot to post this, so more limited time on the redemption.

Galactic Civilizations II is available for about 2 more hours (it's currently 11AM EST on 2018-05-19).  Another one I recommend.

23
But managing projects and such, I find that it falls flat.
Project management is coming in the next release of the v3 beta

That's welcome to hear.

24
Anuran does something similar, and is what I used before I started using WakaTime.

25
I don't think that you lose access to documents or files.

I also don't think that the Office365 price is excessive.
In the UK I can buy a 5 computer licence for between £50 and £60 from Amazon which can last 13 months (by switching to automatic renewal which you then turn off to enter your new annual code). And that also gives you 1TB storage. I can remember the prices that Bill Gates charged.

You don't, and I agree it's quite good, and agree that the price isn't exorbitant.

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