topbanner_forum
  *

avatar image

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
  • October 22, 2019, 08:50 AM
  • Proudly celebrating 13 years online.
  • Donate now to become a lifetime supporting member of the site and get a non-expiring license key for all of our programs.
  • donate

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Vurbal [ switch to compact view ]

Pages: prev1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 ... 25next
51
One thing I would do once you have your setup for raising the car and pulling wheels, is check the disk brakes.  What happens especially when the calipers have a lot of time since the last service(or they never were serviced) is you push the piston(s) all the way in so that you can fit the new brake pads in.  This pushes the crud clinging to the piston through the seal inside the caliper.  Typically that is when they hang.  Usually after you drive the car for a few days one gets "frozen" so that the brake on that wheel drags.  You used to be able to tell by the car pulling to that side when you jabbed the brakes.  But with the computer controlled systems now you might not notice until stuff on that wheel overheats.

I got around it on an old Chevy Impala because in the shop there was a pile of Chevy disk brake pads we removed waiting to be sent for relining.  I picked out those about 70% worn and slid them in without having to do the caliper rebuild.  Just turning the rotors.  Nice and cheap.  $0 for parts.  :)  The moral of the story being never assume you can just put new pads in.  You may be lucky but more often than not it doesn't last.  You can end up wiping out the other brake and wheel components.


I had that happen to me on the old ('92) cop car I owned. The one brake job I did turned into a major nightmare before I even got started, when the Napa counter monkey couldn't figure out the rear disc brakes. Fortunately, I had a friend with his own shop who was trading car repairs for computer work.

I left the rear brakes for him because it was pulling badly to the right when I hit the brakes, and I didn't want to open that can of worms in my driveway. I don't remember what all had to be replaced when everything was said and done, but it was extensive. I knew enough about cars to know when I'm in over my head

I miss that car, but it needed too much work to justify keeping it.

52
Living Room / Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« on: March 12, 2015, 05:12 PM »
I think this explains the issue pretty well - except that his examples are actually much closer to the original, compositionally speaking.


53
Living Room / Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« on: March 12, 2015, 02:55 PM »
This is the problem with the way copyright is often applied. The line between idea and expression has been blurred by big corporations to the point it effectively doesn't exist.

Marvin Gaye neither wrote nor copyrighted the instrumental arrangements for any of his songs. He walked into the studio with the words and their melody written (the copyrighted portion) and the session musicians threw together the rest. If copyrighting the feel of other musicians' performances is copyright infringement, there are very few songs ever recorded which aren't infringing.

54
For reading novels, I prefer even my wife's inferior (compared to a dedicated ereader) 7-inch Android tablet to dealing with a book.

Vurbal, what makes it inferior? The hardware or the software experience? Not much you can do about the hardware except lay out money for a new tablet, but if it's software then there are many, many different ereading apps available. It's just a matter of finding the right app that does the things you want.

It's a cheap, older tablet and doesn't have a display that's optimized for reading. That's fine. I need a tablet, and it's available when I need to read a book. I'm quite happy with both of the reader apps I use, which cost me a grand total of $10 between them.

55
That's definitely true, and
The epub format really is a different format when you deal with layout and such, which is probably the reason that they don't have it.  When I was helping Evil Hat test out their epub versions of their books, it was apparent that they had to put real work into making it available in epub.

Definitely true. In fact, the layouts in the Hero System books are particularly unsuitable for direct epub conversion, since they tend to have lots of embedded bits like charts and images, not to mention examples and details provided in a separate sidebar on the page.

What epub really needs IMO is robust javascript support. It wouldn't help in every case, but if you could include content that's normally hidden, but available through some simple interface, it would go a long way. Javascript would also make it relatively easy to add cool features to something like a coding book. For example, you could have selectable code formatting styles, using relatively simple CSS, to customize examples for the reader.

Of course, there's no substitute for having the right size display, or just having a physical book in some cases.

Which brings us back to the original point- there are features available in e-ink, digital formats, dead tree publications... devices, content, and functionality converge to create a unique experience when you switch up any of the variables.  As such, I don't think there's better or worse- especially for every situation.  Just like with the OS wars and the browser wars and all the other tech wars- they're pointless.  Use the tool that is best for the given situation, and don't let anyone dictate which you should use.  And especially with books- it doesn't matter how you read, just *that* you read, IMO.  Live outside the confines of your own mind by reading the thoughts, ideas, imaginings, and information you can only get from that experience.

Exactly right. Ebooks open up the options for reading, which has, in fact, drastically increased the amount of reading many people - especially kids - do today. It's not a substitute for physical books, so much as a supplement. Neither is objectively better than the other, but each has subjective benefits you have to consider for yourself. As long as you're reading, you've got the important bit down.

56
Speaking of RPG books... on DriveThruRPG they watermark the PDFs with the users name/e-mail address.  Some consider this a form of DRM... but is it?  It's not managing digital rights in any way that I can see...

I bought a few watermarked PDFs from them, and I had to give that quite a bit of thought. On balance, it comes down to intrusiveness into the reading experience and tracking - for me anyway. There's no tracking, which is by far the most significant factor, but also no reliance on third party servers or services. If I really wanted the watermarks gone, it's simple enough to do with a free PDF editor. Considering the discount I was getting, and the fact 1 or 2 of them were out of print, the watermark didn't bother me.

The primary company I buy PDFs from (and man I wish they were available in epub) is Hero Games. Their early PDFs were watermarked with the purchaser's name, followed by non-watermarked, but partially feature hobbled editions, until they eventually started working with a layout and authoring guy who refuses to enable any feature that might annoy the consumer/reader.

57
I like ebooks for reference material, although you have to have a larger screen to use some material effectively. I don't mess with DRM on anything I buy, but I don't buy much. Most of my acquisitions have been public domain novels, and what I buy is mostly Oreilly or RPG ebooks.

I put up with DRM infested books from the public library. I've worked my way back through the first several Spenser books, by Robert B. Parker, and caught up on The Dresden Files. For reading novels, I prefer even my wife's inferior (compared to a dedicated ereader) 7-inch Android tablet to dealing with a book. For absorbing mass amounts of technical information, paper and ebooks both have their advantages. I'd prefer a well indexed, annotated, and cross-linked epub to paper, but if given the choice I'd have both.

Of course, when I say absorbing mass amounts, I generally mean reading them cover to cover, or nearly so, in a single sitting. That's usually followed by re-reading individual sections at least once each, and most of them numerous times. I read Managing the Windows NT Registry on the plane to Cleveland and Essential Windows NT System Administration on the way to and back from Alabama. Both are still on my bookshelf, along with the 1995 edition of Aeleen Frisch's original (Unix oriented) Essential System Administration.

58
I think these networks were always an inevitable development, and not because of the current obvious attempts to intercept and control communication, but because of its inevitability.

It has also occurred to me that some technological countermeasures to a lot of the dirty tricks at any conceivable point upstream would best be accomplished using a true peer to peer network of private individuals, and participating in a sort of cooperative networking framework. It would be a borderline tinfoil hat approach to the problem. However, if the question is, indeed, not whether you're paranoid, but whether you're paranoid enough, I can safely say, "Yes I am!"

59
The equivalent to hotkeys in a touch interface, when there is one, is typically some sort of multitouch gesture, like when you pinch to zoom. On Android there's also the menu button, but, for various reasons, I can't imagine that being used (or useful) as an alternative to the keyboard shortcuts. I figured if there was something equivalent, it would involve a capability also available in Windows Phone, which brings me back to gestures.

Ah, I see - this link gives the basic gestures available: Getting Started with Remote Desktop Client on Android

And if the host is a Windows 8 computer you also have access to it's touch screen gestures, (as per the note near the bottom of that page).

Haven't found something for Alt-Tab yet which is rather annoying now that you've brought it up - might be worth putting an email to MS support asking about it, (haven't really needed that since it's easy to hit the Taskbar or SysTray for the stuff I use).

That's actually more than I was expecting, and there is, apparently significant support for using an external mouse. I'd be more inclined to use it with a tablet than a phone anyway, which presumably is what they had in mind.

Of course, at that point I'd rather just stick with my Win8 Transformer Book. The touchpad and keyboard are both kind of pathetic, but, at least the way I use it, they're just there to supplement the touchscreen anyway.

60
@SJ & Vurbal: YMMV naturally, I'd tried other forms of remote access apps but I'll stick with the Microsoft one until something else comes along that's better for my use.

Instead of having you immediately trying to move the mouse pointer or click a button by trying to get your finger in exactly the right spot, (how many of us can see where the pointer is through our finger), it defaults to moving the mouse pointer by moving your finger anywhere on screen - you don't need to stick your finger on the pointer.  You can position the mouse precisely and then tap anywhere on screen for an LMB click or two-finger tap for RMB.

You can zoom in/out as usual to expand a portion of the screen but I find I don't need to do that for pointer positioning, sometimes for reading something.

You can also switch to the normal method of the mouse being positioned under your finger if you have a bigger screen.

Microsoft RDP is also the only thing that's ever shown me exactly the same thing as I see on the computers monitor unlike various forms of VNC I've tried.

And I don't need any third party software/servers to use it.

I'm not a huge fan of VNC either, and it's more than just that issue. The VNC servers I've used also seem prone to suddenly develop fatal connection problems with no error messages or clear indication of what suddenly changed. IIRC I only used it on that Android phone because there was no reasonably priced RDP client available at the time. I want to say I only found one, and it was something like $25. I'd have paid that if it was a work thing, but not for my minimal home use at the time.

Not quite sure what you mean Vurbal, gesture support?  Not AFAIK.  There's four or five versions of keyboard interface and what looks like handwriting input, (I think).

I'm not exactly clear on what I mean either. ;D  Mostly I was trying to ask an open ended question, without over explaining what I meant. I know, who would ever accuse me of that?

So here's the verbose version. The Windows RDP client has variations on the standard Windows keyboard shortcuts like Alt-Tab for switching Windows. They're not the same ones you use for your local Windows session, for obvious reasons. Those are great for a standard keyboard/mouse oriented interface, but using a keyboard is doing things the long way on a touchscreen.

The equivalent to hotkeys in a touch interface, when there is one, is typically some sort of multitouch gesture, like when you pinch to zoom. On Android there's also the menu button, but, for various reasons, I can't imagine that being used (or useful) as an alternative to the keyboard shortcuts. I figured if there was something equivalent, it would involve a capability also available in Windows Phone, which brings me back to gestures.

It would surprise me to see, but I didn't want to dismiss the possibility out of hand. Microsoft developers tend to be very good when the suits get out of their way.

61
^ I'll second (third?) that sentiment. The sole element of the article I would identify as being maybe, kind of, almost specifically feminist, if you squint really hard in just the right light, is her experience with an abusive partner. Due purely to differences in relationship and communication styles, it's perhaps more relevant to women than men, and, even then, only in the particulars.

In any case, it's nothing more than an example to illustrate a larger point. In her excitement about the potential opportunity, she jumped into a business relationship predicated on blind faith, rather than due diligence. One of several excellent themes in the piece is to avoid making decisions that way. If there's a more universal lesson for anyone entering into business, or numerous other ventures, I can't imagine what it would be.

She's writing from experience, which wouldn't be particularly credible if she didn't disclose what that experience is. She's definitely biased, but in a good way. I see a bias toward the wisdom to ask the right questions and intelligence to understand the answers. She acquits herself well on both fronts. In fact, I've bookmarked it to go back and read again, and also to share with my daughter - because she's a writer, not because she's a woman.

Thanks for sharing it mouser!

62
Microsoft Remote Desktop - Remote PC access (works better than any other Android remote app I've tried).

Really?! I've always been a bit to skeptical (to try it) about the screen size making it impossible to do effectively ...(yes I am playing the tiny text/old guy card here)... But you're saying it is actually a viable option?

I'm curious about this as well. Back when I had my first Android phone, and app options were significantly more limited, I used a VNC client to remote into my HTPC. It was more convenient than using a keyboard and mouse, but extremely clumsy, and something I used as little as possible. Ironically, I'd expect to have more problems with the Galaxy Note 2 I have now. The screen real estate is more than twice my ancient HTC POS, but the dot pitch is less than half.

Besides readability, I'd be concerned about touch UI precision, or, perhaps more accurately, inaccuracy of the hammers I have in place of normal fingertips. VNC would have been practically unusable without the optical trackpad button on my old POS HTC, and I imagine I would be fine using the active stylus on my Galaxy Note, but I'm hesitant to rely on an app where it's practically a requirement.

I haven't used RDP for several years and multiple generations. Does it (or even just the Android app) still limit you to a preset resolution, or is there a more advanced zoom feature? Perhaps even more importantly for me, since I could probably do practically everything I'd use it for blindfolded, does it provide a touch oriented alternative to the standard RDP hotkeys?

63
While it's simple for end users to re-flash their hard drives using executable files provided by manufacturers, it's just about impossible for an outsider to reverse engineer a hard drive, read the existing firmware, and create malicious versions.

This may be due to my own ignorance on these matters, but I don't understand their claims about it being nearly impossible to be able to read the hard drive firmware and figure it out. People have hacked other "black boxes" by poking and prodding, reverse engineered them, and then written custom code to run on them. What makes hard drive firmwares so different from anything else?

Because the OS normally doesn't provide low level access to drive hardware to even an administrative user.

64
^ I resemble that remark.  :D

65
On the "good" side, we may get to see our first real world Bond villains.  :o

But having Bond villains without Bond seems a tad bit counterproductive.  :tellme:

You're just not thinking enough like a spook. And no, I can't believe I wrote that either.

Maybe the creation of a new superspy agency was their long game from the beginning.

Step 1: Create a team of top secret super hackers
Step 2: Wait for them to go rogue and start SMERSH
Step 3: Use it as an excuse to build a new army of super agents

That's convoluted and asinine enough to be believable. It does, however, have one major flaw. Nobody in the intelligence business thinks that far ahead. Technically, you could say we have no intelligence agencies - just counter intelligence, and only in the most literal sense.

66
On the "good" side, we may get to see our first real world Bond villains.  :o

67
A government sponsored team of super hackers - what could possibly go wrong?

68
I'd say your assessment is spot on. In fact, the reason I know Process Explorer crashes are an ongoing problem with this computer is because I continue to use it. Both it and System Explorer have features I wouldn't want to do without.

Also, I should probably test out this latest version on my computer to see if the problem even exists any more.

69
I'm glad to see them finally get with the program and implement this. System Explorer has had it for at least a couple years. I'm actually a little surprised it took the SysInternals team so long to catch up.

Having said that, for every day use, I still prefer System Explorer. As much as I love Process Explorer, IME it has a tendency to crash frequently on some machines, my current desktop being one of them.

70
General Software Discussion / Re: Win7 update loop
« on: February 14, 2015, 04:17 PM »
However, automatic updates are not enabled and there is at least 1 pending update which hasn't been installed, once again suggesting my son wasn't responsible. He wouldn't have any reason to pick just 1 to install.

Hm... same here, is yours KB3021917 from 2/10/15 also?

Why yes it is. Very interesting indeed.

71
General Software Discussion / Re: Win7 update loop
« on: February 14, 2015, 09:57 AM »
Probably a bad download that can't install properly - why not reset windows update and let windows do the update properly - or else download it and do it manually?

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/971058

+1 - Windows updates do on occasion get stuck on a bad File. If you find out which one is looping you can Google it and probably find a few other people with the same problem...and a fix. If not, hide only the problem child...do not disable everything.


Speaking of bad WU behavior, has anyone else noticed Windows suddenly deciding to re-enabled the automatic reboot by itself? I've been on a manual update schedule for years. But this past week - after making none of my own changes - my computer just decided to start rebooting for updates ... All by its evil little self.

Mine didn't do that exactly. It was insisting on rebooting after installing an update, which I assumed meant my son installed one without asking/telling me. He insists that didn't happen.

However, automatic updates are not enabled and there is at least 1 pending update which hasn't been installed, once again suggesting my son wasn't responsible. He wouldn't have any reason to pick just 1 to install.

72
Living Room / Re: Peer Review and the Scientific Process
« on: February 14, 2015, 09:24 AM »
@Renegade

You're right. There's no point in discussing it as long as we're talking about different things. I'm done.

73
Living Room / Re: Peer Review and the Scientific Process
« on: February 13, 2015, 02:25 PM »
Having seen how another forum with similar types of people has struggled to deal with this sort of thing, I view the basement as the worst possible solution, except for all the alternatives.

74
Living Room / Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« on: February 13, 2015, 10:28 AM »
^ On the good side, that leaves us with more money for the higher power amps we need and more efficient speakers to save our backs, not to mention another bass or 2. I'm thinking I'll be replacing my POS low end Hartke cab soon with a Bill Fitzmaurice DIY kit.

I would, however, like to get a good compressor pedal, and the Keeley seems to be the one that gets the best reviews. My old Trace head has built in compressor that sounds surprisingly good at a minimal setting. Of course, there are no fine tuning options, and, unlike a pedal, it's not exactly portable to another amp.

75
Living Room / Re: Peer Review and the Scientific Process
« on: February 13, 2015, 09:49 AM »
I'm trying hard to avoid that necessity, but I'm obviously not in a position to look at it objectively.  :)

Pages: prev1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 ... 25next