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Last post Author Topic: Any native english speakers?  (Read 5302 times)

kalos

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Any native english speakers?
« on: August 30, 2017, 04:56 PM »
Hello!

Can you tell me please what do you think the answer to the questions below is?

http://i.imgur.com/qMyZ9Ay.png

This one says "a" doctor "would" report. Is this talking about a random doctor or all doctors?

Thanks!

mouser

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2017, 05:11 PM »
That question at the end is very awkwardly phrased, and is not written in a way that has a real answer.

The question, after the story, is: "A doctor would report to the police a patient who was a danger to others: True | False | Cannot say"

This doesn't quite make sense as a question.  It sounds like it should be asking your opinion, as in: "SHOULD a doctor would report to the police a patient who was a danger to others"

As written, the most generous way to answer it would be that the story tells you that "MOST" doctors believe that they should report such things.  So that the answer to the question "A doctor would report.." would be: "most doctors would".
Whether the closest answer in that case would be "cannot say" or "true" is in the eye of the beholder.

Your question:
This one says "a" doctor "would" report. Is this talking about a random doctor or all doctors?

The statement is very unclear and not something a native speaker would write.  I would say the closest interpretation would be "a random doctor".

But I suspect that the question was mistranslated, and the best answer to such a question on a test would be "I REFUSE TO ANSWER THIS QUESTION BECAUSE IT IS MALFORMED."

mwb1100

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2017, 05:26 PM »
The paragraph says that *some* doctors have an "absolute confidentiality" policy, but *most* doctors have a policy that allows them to report when there's a danger to society.  So I would answer the question with "Cannot say" because the text says that some doctors will not report under any conditions, and therefore you cannot say what an arbitrary doctor would do.

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2017, 05:37 PM »
Thanks, I felt really stupid not being able to answer that confidently.

As for the below, any idea?
http://i.imgur.com/rBohyhz.png

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2017, 05:39 PM »
The paragraph says that *some* doctors have an "absolute confidentiality" policy, but *most* doctors have a policy that allows them to report when there's a danger to society.  So I would answer the question with "Cannot say" because the text says that some doctors will not report under any conditions, and therefore you cannot say what an arbitrary doctor would do.

True, but at the same time, an arbitrary doctor "would" report, because there are some doctors who do report.

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2017, 02:44 PM »
Thanks, I felt really stupid not being able to answer that confidently.

As for the below, any idea?
http://i.imgur.com/rBohyhz.png


Any idea?

Contro

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2017, 02:48 PM »
 ;D
I am not a native speaker, but in the forum of AHK they take me by one in the spanis forum !!!!!!!!!!!

 :-*

I think is not a random doctor, only a not determined doctor.

tomos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2017, 12:41 PM »
The paragraph says that *some* doctors have an "absolute confidentiality" policy, but *most* doctors have a policy that allows them to report when there's a danger to society.  So I would answer the question with "Cannot say" because the text says that some doctors will not report under any conditions, and therefore you cannot say what an arbitrary doctor would do.

True, but at the same time, an arbitrary doctor "would" report, because there are some doctors who do report.
No.
What mwb1100 says is correct.
Tom

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2017, 01:18 PM »
Thanks, I felt really stupid not being able to answer that confidently.

As for the below, any idea?
http://i.imgur.com/rBohyhz.png


Any idea?

OK but this one is different, it's maths but I cannot solve it :(

Curt

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2017, 05:18 PM »
1) If you're not supposed to already know the rules for a doctor, then the answer is "Cannot say", because of "some doctors this, and some doctors that".
2) The difference is £1.182

tomos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2017, 03:37 AM »
2) The difference is £1.182
I'm presuming you mean one thousand etc., in which case it would have a comma:
£1,182
Tom

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2017, 03:55 PM »
1) If you're not supposed to already know the rules for a doctor, then the answer is "Cannot say", because of "some doctors this, and some doctors that".
2) The difference is £1.182


How you got that?

I think the percentage of price increase for each property is (216-182)/182 and (175-146)/146.
So the first price will increase 18681 and the second 19863. So the total difference in price will be 18681 + 19863 = 38544

I don't see any error in the above calculations???

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2017, 05:29 PM »
Anyone??

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2017, 05:59 PM »
???????????????

Contro

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2017, 05:17 AM »
???????????????
Debe ser que no hay kalos. Yo es que vivo en España. Lo mismo te valgo. El otro día me dijeron que parecia un inglés nativo.
It may there are not native english here. I live and was born in Tenerife. But i may serve you. The other day someone tells me I was a native english speaker.

Up ! up ! up !
 ;D



kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2017, 05:22 AM »
It's a maths question!

4wd

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2017, 06:24 AM »
So the first price will increase 18681 and the second 19863. So the total difference in price will be 18681 + 19863 = 38544

I don't see any error in the above calculations???

You sure about that?

If both increase then the difference between them is not going to be the summation of the increases.

2) The difference is £1.182
I'm presuming you mean one thousand etc., in which case it would have a comma:
£1,182

Regional difference Tomos, a period is used in some countries, prefer spaces myself as per ISO standard.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2017, 08:05 AM by 4wd »

tomos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2017, 11:06 AM »
2) The difference is £1.182
I'm presuming you mean one thousand etc., in which case it would have a comma:
£1,182

Regional difference Tomos, a period is used in some countries, prefer spaces myself as per ISO standard.

Yes, I live in one of those countries (where a period is used), but was presuming the answer should also be in 'native english'. I didnt realise though it was more complex than that. Using spaces is nice, especially for bigger numbers.
Tom

IainB

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #18 on: December 23, 2017, 04:55 PM »
@kalos: Eh? That looks like spam. Maybe @@kalos' DCF account has been hacked?

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #19 on: December 23, 2017, 07:02 PM »
No it's not hacked! Why do you think it's spam?

It was just a web hosting link, here I uploaded it somewhere else:

https://uploadpie.com/TMRnAZ
« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 07:07 PM by kalos »

wraith808

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #20 on: December 23, 2017, 07:13 PM »
No it's not hacked! Why do you think it's spam?

It was just a web hosting link, here I uploaded it somewhere else:

https://uploadpie.com/TMRnAZ


The prior link had porn on it which is why I agreed with IainB and deleted it.  Archive.is can't interpret this one, so I'd suggest approaching it with caution.

What is this one?  It would help if you'd include a description.

IainB

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #21 on: December 23, 2017, 10:16 PM »
OIC. The question is a bit confusing. It seems to be a an accounting question, except they have apparently confused it by using (misusing) the term "trend".
Generally speaking one will not necessarily be able to establish a significant statistical trend from just 2 (or 3) successive annual data-points. A significant trend usually only emerges over longer time-series data. Thus, to be correct, there are no "trends" in the data given in the example.

I would guess that what the question probably means is:
If the rate of growth or decline of the factors (costs and revenues) between year 1 and year 2 is repeated in year 3, then what would the tax be?

STEP 1: As a quick rule of thumb, I would initially calculate the percentage net rate of growth in pre-tax revenue, between year 1 and 2, and project the year 3 pre-tax revenue based on that percentage, then apply the 35% tax rate to the projected revenue, to arrive at a projected year 3 taxation figure.
The growth in pre-tax revenue would be a net factor of the sum of the rate of growth or decline of the factors (costs and revenues) between year 1 and 2.

STEP 2: You could show workings for a proof of that (i.e., checking the rule of thumb) by projecting the factors (costs and revenues) for year 3 and adding them up. This is usually good practice anyway (especially when using spreadsheets) since it checks your initial calculation (above) and will identify any errors made.

Having said that, you'd be surprised how many people omit such elementary checks to prove the figures calculated in spreadsheets. Reminds me of some years back in NZ when the published Treasury budgets were found to be embarrassingly out of whack by a factor of 10 because of a simple spreadsheet error, where a check of the type above would have easily identified the error prior to publication. Not a good look.    :-[

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #22 on: December 24, 2017, 09:22 AM »
No it's not hacked! Why do you think it's spam?

It was just a web hosting link, here I uploaded it somewhere else:

https://uploadpie.com/TMRnAZ


The prior link had porn on it which is why I agreed with IainB and deleted it.  Archive.is can't interpret this one, so I'd suggest approaching it with caution.

What is this one?  It would help if you'd include a description.

Ah sorry didn't know that, it's a simple maths question.

kalos

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2017, 09:25 AM »
OIC. The question is a bit confusing. It seems to be a an accounting question, except they have apparently confused it by using (misusing) the term "trend".
Generally speaking one will not necessarily be able to establish a significant statistical trend from just 2 (or 3) successive annual data-points. A significant trend usually only emerges over longer time-series data. Thus, to be correct, there are no "trends" in the data given in the example.

I would guess that what the question probably means is:
If the rate of growth or decline of the factors (costs and revenues) between year 1 and year 2 is repeated in year 3, then what would the tax be?

STEP 1: As a quick rule of thumb, I would initially calculate the percentage net rate of growth in pre-tax revenue, between year 1 and 2, and project the year 3 pre-tax revenue based on that percentage, then apply the 35% tax rate to the projected revenue, to arrive at a projected year 3 taxation figure.
The growth in pre-tax revenue would be a net factor of the sum of the rate of growth or decline of the factors (costs and revenues) between year 1 and 2.

STEP 2: You could show workings for a proof of that (i.e., checking the rule of thumb) by projecting the factors (costs and revenues) for year 3 and adding them up. This is usually good practice anyway (especially when using spreadsheets) since it checks your initial calculation (above) and will identify any errors made.

Having said that, you'd be surprised how many people omit such elementary checks to prove the figures calculated in spreadsheets. Reminds me of some years back in NZ when the published Treasury budgets were found to be embarrassingly out of whack by a factor of 10 because of a simple spreadsheet error, where a check of the type above would have easily identified the error prior to publication. Not a good look.    :-[

I think that's what I did. I projected the values to year 3.
There are two ways to project them, one by keeping the change percentage same and the othe by keeping the change same. I would go with the first, but I find something like 3.1 :/

IainB

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Re: Any native english speakers?
« Reply #24 on: December 24, 2017, 08:23 PM »
Yo no comprendo.
STEP 1 (calculate)
STEP 2 (proof)

...That's it.
It would seem to be an elementary accounting question.