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Author Topic: Mitnick - The Art Of Intrusion: Ch 1 - Hacking The Casinos For A Million Bucks  (Read 2854 times)


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This is old, but i just read it and it's a great read.

From Kevin Mitnick's Book The Art Of Intrusion. Ch 1 - Hacking The Casinos For A Million Bucks

There comes a magical gambler’s moment when simple thrills magnify to become 3-D fantasies — a moment when greed chews up ethics and the casino system is just another mountain waiting to be conquered. In that single moment the idea of a foolproof way to beat the tables or the machines not only kicks in but kicks one’s breath away.

Alex Mayfield and three of his friends did more than daydream. Like many other hacks, this one started as an intellectual exercise just to see if it looked possible. In the end, the four actually beat the system, taking the casinos for “about a million dollars,” Alex says.

from http://www.cynical-c.com/


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There's actually a few television documentaries about this, I'm not sure if it's these guys or other guys (I didn't read tfa), but I remember seeing a guy that had made a special set of glasses and inside the glasses he had put a few tiny LEDs connected to a computer and a switch in his shoe. The switch in his shoe would input the cards on the table, and the computer would calculate the best move and signal it to him with the LEDs in his glasses. Crazy. :)