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Author Topic: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression  (Read 1797 times)

Carol Haynes

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Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« on: February 04, 2016, 05:50:07 AM »
It is official - now Windows 10 is part of the recommended updates for Windows 7

http://www.theverge....e-recommended-update

If you have the default Windows Update settings it will download and start the installation. Ok you can stop it but I can see my life getting busier over the next few weeks.

Not sure if this isn't actually criminal - I have some programmes that are not Windows 10 compatible that I rely on for work - an automated update would really mess with my business!!! Wait for the law suits

If you want to block Windows 10 upgrades altogether create these registry keys (you can create a .reg file in notepad and cut and paste the following - then double click the file and add the entries automatically):

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\OSUpgrade]
"AllowOSUpgrade"=dword:00000000
"ReservationsAllowed"=dword:00000000

[-HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\OSUpgrade\State]

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\GWX]
"DisableGWX"=dword:00000001

dr_andus

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2016, 12:54:05 PM »
Yes, it is an incredible situation when customers are forced to take extra measures of protection in order not to accidentally 'buy' a 'free' product they don't want.

Few other situations I can think of where I have to do all this just to not get something.

I guess protecting myself against a virus or malware is what comes to mind...

holt

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2016, 07:46:00 PM »
"I'm from the government Microsoft and I'm here to help."  8)

"Gee, so you're a Microsoft upgrade technician. Wow, can I help you out? Which way did you come in?"
"This is the best bad idea we have, sir. By far." (cf. 'Argo'.)

Deozaan

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2016, 08:07:40 PM »
Must be time to move to Linux and put Windows <10 in a VM with a snapshot you can revert to if it somehow accidentally tries to update itself. ;)


Stephen66515

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2016, 08:09:53 PM »
What happens if you upgrade, then use the downgrade option? Will it still bug you to upgrade then?

Stoic Joker

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2016, 06:41:07 AM »
e, so you're a Microsoft upgrade technician. Wow, can I help you out? Which way did you come in?"

Through the window of course.. ;)

xtabber

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2016, 08:53:44 AM »
The latest Windows 10 update changes many associations to default to what is built in to the OS.

It's looking more and more as if Microsoft's strategy is not just to force Windows users to switch to Windows 10, but also to make it harder for them to use non-Microsoft software for browsing and viewing.  This is clearly not by accident - using Windows built-in browser and viewers allows the company to collect commercially valuable information about what users are viewing.

Meet the new Microsoft.  Same as the old Microsoft.


rgdot

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2016, 10:05:40 AM »
Most of the comments below it say their defaults didn't change, my personal Win10 use is only in a VM , will try to check what happens

4wd

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2016, 06:45:16 PM »
Most of the comments below it say their defaults didn't change, my personal Win10 use is only in a VM , will try to check what happens

NVM, I misread  :-[

xtabber

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2016, 08:04:05 AM »
Update on Updategate: According to Microsoft, this is a bug in Windows Update, which the company is aware of, not a deliberate attempt to hijack your system.

That does not mean they will hold off forcing updates on users while they try to figure out what the problem is.

So I will retract my previous comment.  The new Microsoft is NOT the same as the old Microsoft.  It is just as irresponsible, but possibly less competent.

wraith808

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2016, 08:14:45 AM »
It is just as irresponsible, but possibly less competent.

That seems a bit less than charitable, as defects happen in every software.  Not a desired outcome, but it happens.

xtabber

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2016, 09:08:20 PM »
It is just as irresponsible, but possibly less competent.

That seems a bit less than charitable, as defects happen in every software.  Not a desired outcome, but it happens.
Yes, defects do happen in all software.

But it's hard to feel much sympathy for a vendor that knows an update is likely to cause serious problems for many users, but refuses to provide any information or to let them opt out from installing it.

wraith808

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2016, 09:46:18 PM »
But it's hard to feel much sympathy for a vendor that knows an update is likely to cause serious problems for many users, but refuses to provide any information or to let them opt out from installing it.

Do we know that they knew before release?

IainB

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Re: Microsoft - Windows 10 aggression
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2016, 11:27:13 PM »
e, so you're a Microsoft upgrade technician. Wow, can I help you out? Which way did you come in?"
Through the window of course.. ;)
___________________

Then the quickest way out would presumably be ... defenestration?    ;)

But seriously, there would seem to be a lot of business sense for Microsoft behind their pushy approach to converting the existing installed bases/populations of Windows (i.e., XP, Vista, Win7, Win8, Win8.1) to Win10, however, this would seem to have little to do with user requirements. User requirements probably don't figure too much in Microsoft's thinking.
 
From a user perspective, the question should probably more properly be: Does the user want or need to upgrade from AS-IS to a new TO-BE state  - e.g., to one of the newer OSes up to and including Win10?
My response would probably be along the lines of: If you are happy using WinThing AS-IS at present, then don't upgrade, unless you feel it would be necessarily useful to first upgrade the PC hardware to (say) 64-bit and jump to the OS that would be most suitable/current to support that hardware. However, would that jump support all of your existing main applications? If not, then stay as you are in AS-IS for as long as you can continue to support the AS-IS state and as long as it is cost-effective and not holding you back in some way.

Following that path of reasoning, the user may decide, for example, that one of the other interim OS versions - i.e., rather than Win10 - might best suit their needs. So, for example, an XP user may decide that moving to Win7-32 would be their best option as it would leave them with a better, more stable, and still currently supported OS, and mean they could continue using all of their existing applications without problems, whereas moving to Win10 would force them to upgrade their applications as it was not backwards compatible and did not support their existing applications. With these sorts of complex considerations, one could map out an array of choices in a condition-action table.

But where it has a monopoly, Microsoft doesn't necessarily want or care to accommodate those sorts of cases, as it doesn't suit their optimum cost-efficiencies and profitability to do so, so that option for the user is effectively going to be squeezed out by persistently pushing/forcing the Win10 upgrade path, even though it might not necessarily be backwards compatible or be the best option for the user. It's the best option for Microsoft that is important in this.

IBM invented this kind of Win-Lose/Trample game and were monopolistic past masters at it, setting the standards, as it were. Microsoft have the excellent IBM model to follow, and have been pretty good at it so far. They are just being a good corporate psychopath.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2016, 11:40:29 PM by IainB »