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Author Topic: Delete my applications' log directory and replace it with a symlink directory?  (Read 477 times)

mindstormer

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I was wondering if I can delete all my applications' log directory and replace it with a symlinked directory to a different hard drive. For example, my programs are installed in C drive and I want all the logs that are created by these applications to be stored on a separate drive. I don't see why this wouldn't work but I want to be sure there are absolutely no caveats or implications that I am not aware of. What are the worst-case (or bad) scenarios trying to do this? Off the top if my head, I can only imagine a scenario where an update to an application changes its log directory location and I did not find out--in that case, logs would still be saved and everything would still be working properly except that I would need to establish a new symlink.

Logs seem to not be a big deal because they don't affect the application, but what about symlinks for stuff like %APPDATA%, out of curiosity? I want to know why it would be dangerous to use symlinks in certain scenarios.

Thanks!

4wd

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Yes, you can do that.

I have Steam (~360GB of games) currently installed in C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam, which is on a 111GB partition as far as the OS is concerned.

I installed Steam into C:\Program Files (x86) and then moved the contents to a 2TB drive and created a hard link back to the empty C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam directory.

Has worked fine for the last 4 or so years.