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Author Topic: Capacitor plague  (Read 1369 times)

Giampy

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Capacitor plague
« on: July 26, 2014, 11:18:48 AM »
Did you already know this story that still affects our electronic equipments?

http://en.wikipedia....iki/Capacitor_plague

"A refrigerator without beer is like a body without soul"

mouser

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Re: Capacitor plague
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2014, 11:31:21 AM »
I think any of you without samsung monitors must be safe, since every single samsung monitor i own has suffered catastrophic capacitor death -- so samsung must have bought out most of the supply of those bad caps  :-\

40hz

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Re: Capacitor plague
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2014, 12:31:23 PM »
TTBOMK it's run its course. If you have a older monitor, which hasn't failed to date, you should be ok. Anything that was going to die early because of bad capacitors most likely already has.

Yay!  :)


Cuffy

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Re: Capacitor plague
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2014, 12:50:30 PM »
Bad capacitors is old news.
I was trained as an electronics tech by the U.S. military in 1953.
Vacuum tubes and paper caps were the order of the day then and you could usually spot a bad cap visually because the oil in the electrolyte drained down and soaked the cardboard. They always seemed to be soldered to the board with a teaspoon of solder?
We're a long ways down the road now and caps are prettier at least, but I have no idea if the failure rate has improved in relation to the time?

http://www.antiqueradio.org/recap.htm

Edvard

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Re: Capacitor plague
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2014, 04:08:38 PM »
I have successfully revived two flat-screen monitors by re-capping.  All it takes a little finesse with screwdriver and soldering iron.  Cheap too, because I used recycled caps from old stereos.  The "Elmers" will tell you don't do that, but I've done it enough times to spot a bad cap in the first place, and my success rate speaks for itself. :Thmbsup: