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Author Topic: Some governments simply don't give a sh**  (Read 441 times)

ital2

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Some governments simply don't give a sh**
« on: June 22, 2017, 04:57:06 AM »
1

Do you know "Domain SEO Service"? Bad question, isn't it? Since of course you know them, everybody knows them. I own about 30 domains, and I don't receive about 30 "offers" and about 30 "final notices" from them, per year, but between 2 and 5 such pieces of sh** per day, which makes it more than a thousand per year, more than 2,000 checks-plus-more-than-1,000-clicks per year:

First, I have to visually check if it's very well them, from the text of the list entry, then click for putting them into my spam folder. Second, whenever I empty my spam folder, I must visually check my spam folder for every entry (in case something was legit and ended up there by accident), then I delete them for good (shift-click possible here, so less clicks).

Since their sending address is always a different one, Outlook (2003: got it better with later versions, out of the box?) is/seems to be too dumb to do a rule for sending them into the spam folder to begin with; probably with some VBA code (but which is unknown to me), this problem could be solved since they don't use but a quite restraint bunch of titles/subjects. So there's three questions here, but I doubt our false Jesus will answer any of them. (And no, I don't ask for the paid solution of hiding owner data, that would have been a fourth question but of which the answer is evident.)

Anyway, googling for them brings lots of complaints, and it even seems that more than one people even paid their invoices (once in their life only, I suppose); their price-for-nothing had been 64$, now it's gone up to 75$, hahahahaha! (Btw, this is not German, but a citation from Visconti's Death in Venice... written by some German indeed, so perhaps that's to be found in the original text, don't bother.)

Needless to say that their "You have received this message because you elected to receive special notification offers." isn't but another one of their fat lies.

So we're speaking of world-wide terrorism here where a billion of people all over the world have been terrorized daily over the years, and here the story gets interesting since the governments concerned obviously don't do anything about this terrorism.

Some web sites say their Florida address is a real one, and that there is some "Matthias Taubert" (which would be a a German name) behind it, so why don't the Americans send that "Matthias Taubert" to Guantanamo? Lots of people have been incarcerated there for much less, after all!

Some other web sites say their servers are in China (well, where else then? right? anybody surprised here? alternative would have been Russia, of course...), and the Chinese are said to maintain c-camps to this day (like the North Koreans do), aren't day? But obviously, they do nothing about the servers (if that localization info is right) or the man either.

Of course, it's possible that there is some real "Matthias Tauber" (or anybody else with any other name) somewhere else, but the Americans could, at the very least, close the Florida (or was it San Diego, California? my sources differ) office, the Chinese could shut down the servers, and how come that terrorist always gets the money from unsuspecting "customers"? They shot down the elby business in the Caribbean this way, after all, so they could it again if they wanted to.

So that "Matthias Tauber" or whatever he calls himself in some passport pays bribes, or even taxes, so that they leave him alone instead of putting an end to this terrorist?

2

easus.com vs eassos.com

In civilized countries, it is a given that you cannot name your business after, ie almost-identical to, some other business and then do business in the same business as they do. (Or name your business after some very well-known business and do business even in any other business than theirs.)

Of course, the software business is a little bit special since if there is a well-established business in some country, how to prevent some crooks, in some other country, to name their business after yours, and/or register a very similar domain, in order to then sell their sh**, even directly competing with yours, world-wide to unsuspecting customers which are led in error by that purposeful naming and mistakenly buy their sh** for yours. (Using slang here: in reality their software is probably, but not necessarily sh** (and it may even be your own code, more or less, hahahahaha), while yours may be sh**, too, but very probably is not, hence the interest in their jumping onto your bandwagon.)

So when, some days ago, I discovered some backup/reinstall software from "Eassos" on some giveaway site, I had been intrigued, and when I discovered, today, some data recovery software from them, in identical circumstances, I decided to have a look; needless to say that I assumed that "easus.com" had been registered long, long before "eassos.com", and I was right of course, 2004 vs 2010.

But both domains are registered from entities in China, as are the numerous entities which sell more or less the same video softwares, under different names and with only very minor GUI variations, so probably I've indeed been wrong here in my assumption that Easus has been the victim of Eassos crooks: The latter may very well just be a spin-off of Easus... but then, in order to do WHAT? The Easus brand is quite well established, and more than one people say their free software works fine for backupping and reinstalling your Windows partition; in my case, the reinstall didn't work but I don't know if the fault was with my external hdd (I had been stupid enough to not have written, at the same time, two backups immediately one after the other, onto two different external hdd's).

Now that (since 2010 even?), Easeus possibly more or less also "is" Eassos, too, and given the fact that the situation is quite muddy, to say the least, and that I am not technically equipped accordingly in order to verify which data a free, Chinese backup software sends to Chinese servers and which data they send not, I will not touch any Easeus software anymore, let alone any Eassos one; your mileage may grossly vary.

Shades

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Re: Some governments simply don't give a sh**
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2017, 10:48:42 PM »
Decent ISPs/domain hosters inform you a month before your domain subscription expires and becomes available to be picked up by any interested party. That is at least my experience with ISPs/domain hosters in the Netherlands and Paraguay...for more than 15 years.

So I don't know where you host your domains, but if you are bombarded by such messages, than it is possible that your hoster doesn't care much about your business or that you have registered domains that are in high demand. Either way, vote with your wallet and move your domains to a hoster that does respect your business. Moving a domain between different hosters can take up to 24 hours, depending on how quickly these changes are picked up by the (global) master DNS servers.

You are right about company names. If memory serves, Easeus was there before Eassos. Anyway, both make quite similar products, I'll admit that. PartitionGuru (Eassos) has helped out of pickles that Easeus software wouldn't. And in most cases I needed to use this type of software on computers that were not connected to the network/internet, so if either company puts out software that "phones" home, I don't care too much. PartitionGuru functions fine without such a connection.

If you want to block such software, use a managed switch or router, which allows you to setup one or more virtual LANs that are not allowed to access the internet and park the computer you want to edit with Easeus or Eassos software for the duration in such a virtual LAN. Problem solved.

Router software such as OPNsense or pfSense even allow you to configure the internet settings for each network card (or group of network cards) that connects to such a router. These routers allow a whole lot more configuration options and I am sure that you find your ideal network setup if you spend some time with either OPNsense or pfSense.

If you must know the content of the data transmitted, use software like WireShark in combination with NetworkMiner to find that out. WireShark is the vastly more powerful tool, but it comes with a steeper learning curve than NetworkMiner. Still, both allow you to capture network traffic and store this for later investigation if you wish. For boyh you must have a good understanding of how network traffic is build up (layered), because if you don't, you will quickly get lost in the mountain of info that is presented to you.

Most software is "phoning home" for one reason or another nowadays anyway and I don't think the Chinese government spies on you in worse ways than other governments do. The Chinese are just more up front with it, that is more or less the only difference. An easy remedy to prevent traffic to/from the internet is to remove the gateway setting from the computer you think runs software that phones home. Without that setting there is simply no internet traffic possible. At all.

Removing that setting (for a short period of time) hardly affects internal network traffic, so you can still work/play on your own network.

ital2

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Re: Some governments simply don't give a sh**
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2017, 02:56:08 PM »
Quite incredibly detailed info again here, Shades, my kudos to you! And in fact, you're without ANY doubt in that range of perhaps 4 or 5 (at most) contributors here with systematically high-quality contributions (of which most are over the top for me, but it's screaming-obvious you know what you're speaking of, every time).


This being said, it hadn't occurred to me that the culprit might be the web PAGE hoster; I had thought that person I would like to see behind bars took it all from the generic whois databases or the registrars, but as implied above, the most appalling thing in his doings is the fact that for the same domains, I get the same "offers" again and again, so that for a given domain, the "offers" are repeated even more than once a week, that's why I call him a terrorist. (I've been too lazy to change the specific domain mail accounts but will do so - at least, I had been smart enough to DO specific domain mail accounts to begin with, so that my important mail accounts are NOT affected by this sh**. (This being a general hint for others.) And you're right, these web pages are not business ones, so I chose a very cheap hoster; unfortunately, I don't remember if this terror has multiplied with that choice, all I can say is, there was at least some of this terror before, with some "good" hoster. I'll change the mail accounts, and then if that a**hole quickly follows me, I can be quite sure the hoster is the culprit - my contract with them is about another year, so I'll able to check (and for business, I would never have chosen them anyway). Will report in case.

And I have noted your comments on the fact that the second business isn't that bad, but if I was the owner of the first one, I would HATE my (here: the Chinese) government for me not being able to stop them using a name as similar to mine - I speak of the government here since in last resort, it's them who are responsible for the laws, for the judicial system and for your real possibilities to stop illegal doings which harm you or harm the general public.

But now for my add-on:


Add Reimage to my list of people-who-should-be-jailed-for-nuisance. ( And I'll do a link at my Reimage comments in the Software Trials thread where I had spoken about Reimage business: http://www.donationc...ex.php?topic=43835.0 )

I wanted to install Advanced IP Scanner on another computer, too; it's neat and free and much better for my needs than for example Lizard Network Scanner, let alone some monster packages. So I went to advanced-ip-scanner.com ; their "direct" download link, in fact to filehippo (but which I prefer for shareware downloads anyway), is currently broken in the sense that filehippo do not have the download currently, so I searched for "advanced ip scanner download" by bing. Bing is real crap (but Bing maps are visually more pleasant than the google ones, as I said before): Ninth link for that search (and thus on the very first page: don't they have ANY quality control, then?) is dvncedpscnnerdownlod.inextshare.com .

But before, let me report advanced-ipscanner.com, on first page for "advanced ip scanner" on bing. The original page, with two "-", is registered on Dmitri Znosko, the developer of that basic but very worthwile tool, while the domain without the second "-" has been registered just some months ago, by some "amit chutney" in India, and it comprises a lot of blah-blah, and lots of links; probably Mr. Chutney tries to get lots of business from people like me who don't find the real thing on the original page anymore - btw I told the developer (not Mr. Chutney) about this problem, so let's see if there will be done something about the legit thing; I ended up installing a slightly older version from my archives - thank you, "Everything", you are invaluable! -, in order to avoid cnet et al.

So back to dvncedpscnnerdownlod.inextshare.com which, by its prominent position, filthy bing, from filthy Microsoft, obviously recommends as download site for Advanced IP Scanner. There were some very quick re-directs, so that the intermediate redirects weren't even recognizable/identifiable by the naked eye, and then I ended up with Reimage, of course, since my post is about that probable crap (see my comments in the other threads). I'm not aware that Reimage also comprises network/ip functionality of the kind offered by Advanced IP Scanner, but I could be wrong.

Of course, I wanted to leave that crap page, so I got a dialog instead; I clicked on "No, I really want to leave" or whatever the button was called, and - you will have guessed it - I got a second dialog in a row, again with several buttons, a "Really leave" among them. Well, I probably should have tried that one, too, in order to make you laugh even more, but I left the page by closing my internet browser; btw, tries to close that crap page by clicking on the "x" on the browser tab will bring the dialogs instead, too (well, needless to say, right?).

Regular porn users will probably have other stories to tell yet, or then not, since they will have experienced even weirder things but ain't willing to share those stories, but even the above is against European law, both the (here: multiple) redirections and the not allowing for your leaving the page, so European authorities should prevent those crap(py) merchants from doing any business in Europe. And:

Do they PAY bing/Microsoft for those links on page one of non-related software (assuming you could find similar such links on other such search result pages)? And: With my Italian, non-US, IP, why doesn't shuffle bing such crap link onto page 10, if really the US don't give a sh** about such 100 p.c. dishonest "business" practices in order to protect THEIR people?