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Last post Author Topic: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations  (Read 4197 times)

Stephen66515

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In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« on: February 05, 2016, 04:54:53 AM »
I currently have a new car on order (Vauxhall Astra Sports Tourer SRi 1.6 Turbo) and was wondering what In-Car Emergency stuff you guys recommend!

2016-Vauxhall-Astra-Sports-Tourer-front-three-quarters.jpgIn-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations

First off, I have chose this:

http://www.right-lig...able-floodlight.html
Quote
5-in-1 Solution

1) LED floodlight.
2) Battery jump starter (comes complete with jump start leads).
3) 150W 240V AC inverter to power laptops etc.
4) USB DC 5V 800mA output - to power mobile phones, tablets etc.
5) DC 12V car cigarette lighter output socket.
Features & Specifications:

Lumen Output: 2200 lumens.
Light Source: LED.
Run Time: High - 9 hours. Low - 21 hours.
Battery: 12V 14Ah SLA.

Seems like it will be very helpful in a lot of situations, and for the price is totally worth it!

I will also be getting:

• In-Car Inverter (12V>Normal Plug)
• Multipurpose Tools
• Privacy Curtains for all windows (These will be custom made by my mother to fit the windows and attach via suction cups)
• Double sleeping bag + double duvet (will be vacuum packed to minimize space taken)
• Toiletries
• Cheap prepaid phone (fully charged with credit for calls)
• Chocolates/Tinned Food/Energy Drinks/Tea Bags/Instant Coffee/Sugar/Coffee Whitener, etc
• Doggy Kibble (We have a dog, so...)
• Ramen Noodles
• In-Car Kettle (mainly so I can have coffee when in the middle of nowhere...we take random drives so this one is for convenience mainly)
• Mini Gas Stove

I've probably missed something, so I will update if I can remember - All of these will be going in a storage container of some sort in where the spare wheel usually would be (seeing as new cars don't come with a spare anymore...might as well make use of that space!)


We plan to sleep in the car on long trips, so a lot of this stuff will end up being used on our random camp-outs!
Anybody want to add anything, or suggest anything?

x16wda

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2016, 05:10:48 AM »
I would recommend a green laser pointer or two - they're cheap, and if you are out of sight of the road for some emergency, the beam could help locate where you are. Or use it for a star pointer (as my son calls it) and point out the constellations before you head off to sleep.
vi vi vi - editor of the beast

Stephen66515

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2016, 05:13:41 AM »
I would recommend a green laser pointer or two - they're cheap, and if you are out of sight of the road for some emergency, the beam could help locate where you are. Or use it for a star pointer (as my son calls it) and point out the constellations before you head off to sleep.

Already own a couple of awesome ones (can be seen in pretty bright sunlight) because my dog things he is a cat and he chases the dot lmao

tomos

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2016, 05:47:39 AM »
Seeing as it's a new car you're may not have to really worry much about this aspect:

I know from using jump leads between cars that the quality of the cables and connectors make a huge difference, i.e. cheaper ones sometimes work, but often dont, for no obvious reason.
Tom

Stephen66515

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2016, 06:11:52 AM »
Seeing as it's a new car you're may not have to really worry much about this aspect:

I know from using jump leads between cars that the quality of the cables and connectors make a huge difference, i.e. cheaper ones sometimes work, but often dont, for no obvious reason.

Not really fussed about the jump leads part of that one, mainly everything else it comes with.

Most of the items I have chosen are useful for if we go out at 2am and end up in Scotland or Wales (this happens way more often than you would think) and if we end up there...instead of driving straight home, we can just find somewhere to park, and go to sleep, and have he comforts of everything in the kit with us.  I agree that with it being a new car, the scenario of breaking down and being stranded are remote..but the possibility of visibility hitting 0 due to fog/snow/rain and us having to stop because of it, is very high (fog is a bit of a problem here and has caused us 1-2 hour stops more than I care to remember).

I'd just like to be prepared for any eventuality :D

IainB

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2016, 06:19:54 AM »
For emergencies, in any car I own, I would usually carry a metal box containing:
  • a decent and inexpensive first-aid kit (I build one up from supermarket/pharmacy purchases, rather than buy an expensive ready-made yet inferior one),
  • a current/recent fire extinguisher (you never know...),
  • a couple of lightweight tow ropes (mainly to help other people, as I also always have a towbar fitted),
  • a pair of jumpstarter cables (again, mainly to help others). (NB: In use, these are rumoured to have the potential to cause surge damage to modern alternators, so now could probably be replaced by one of those new small lithium-based starter-pack kits.),
  • a toilet roll (paper),
  • a kitchen roll (paper),
  • a few lengths of lightweight nylon rope,
  • a small portable foot-pump,
  • a small tyre-pressure gauge (foot-pump gauges are unreliable).

And don't forget to prudently check the pressures on the car tyres at cold every couple of weeks, and on the spare tyre every couple of months, maintaining the latter at a few PSI above its highest normal recommended operating pressure (front/back tyres tend to have different recommended pressures).

Also, hung from the central rear-view mirror, to forestall emergencies, to appeal to or appease the gods, or to otherwise improve one's statistical odds of good fortune on the road (can be used variously singly or together):
  • a Saint Christopher (patron saint of travellers) pendant,
  • a cross pendant (Christian/Anglican),
  • a crucifix pendant (Roman Catholic),
  • a rosary or prayer beads, etc,
  • a Buddha pendant (Buddhist,
  • a freshly-killed chicken (Voodoo),
  • two soft dice cubes (for atheists).

However, be warned, from personal experience, that the freshly-killed chicken or the two soft dice cubes can seriously inhibit the driver's forward vision through the windscreen, which could well cause/induce an accident. Used together they could make the driver "a menace on the roads", as one traffic officer politely but sternly told me after booking me for failing to stop at a STOP sign because it was obscured from my vision by these objects being hung from my mirror.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 06:30:38 AM by IainB »

Stoic Joker

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2016, 06:34:54 AM »
A small 12v air compressor can be handy for all sorts of things. I had one mounted under the seat of my bike years ago, and became and became quite popular on runs because I could use it to blow up air mattresses (and etc.) for people in just a few minutes.


I think 150w is a bit low for inverter output. You might want to get something closer to 500W, to ensure it will handle laptops..

I have a client that is currently fighting with the Ford dealership. Because the factory "400W" inverter keeps overloading while trying to power a single Dell laptop with a 180W power supply. Multiple laptop and power supply combinations - all rated at 180W - have been tried...and they all trip the overload on the inverter.

I suspect that 400W is only the peak load that the unit is rated for, and the running load is actually much (much...) lower.

Just a thought. :D


P.S. Always carry a towel!

Stephen66515

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2016, 07:31:08 AM »
And don't forget to prudently check the pressures on the car tyres at cold every couple of weeks, and on the spare tyre every couple of months, maintaining the latter at a few PSI above its highest normal recommended operating pressure (front/back tyres tend to have different recommended pressures).

This one isn't a problem in my new car as I get e-mail alerts if my tyre pressure is low (or my engine fluids), as well as an indication on the dashboard...and if I am really unsure, I can call the OnStar team and have them remotely check my Fluid Levels and Tyre Pressures...I find this odd and slightly daunting (Although I do currently run a 2012 model car...it isn't very well equipped...like..it doesn't even have satnav...about the most interesting feature on it is the fact I can listen to DAB radio...yeah...that's the selling point on that one *shrugs*)  :huh:

Stoic Joker

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2016, 11:20:37 AM »
This one isn't a problem in my new car as I get e-mail alerts if my tyre pressure is low (or my engine fluids), as well as an indication on the dashboard...and if I am really unsure, I can call the OnStar team and have them remotely check my Fluid Levels and Tyre Pressures

OMFG *FacePalm* You have got to be kidding me?!?

NEVER Trust a Sensor to do an EyeBalls job!

Wander out there, pop open the hood...and familiarize yourself with what things are supposed to look like. That way on some dark night when it decides to misbehave and you open the hood...you'll have a bit better chance of spotting something that out of place.

Sensors malfunction ... So if a fluid is that important - like coolant or brake fluid - put an eye on it and know it's okay ... don't expect some clod sitting in an office 3,000 miles away to guess at it for you based on some pass/fail based digital dashboard. It could be close enough to the edge to kill/strand you...but not quite enough to trip the warning light.


4wd

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2016, 07:30:40 PM »
Let's see, in the Landcruiser:
  • Enough tools so that I could conceivably drop the engine, gearbox, transfer case, differential, or anything else that would require repair.
  • Two 4m polypropylene tow ropes rated at 3 tonnes, (great for removing downed trees and impromptu winching), plus rated D-shackles.
  • Pocket chainsaw.
  • Heavy duty air compressor.
  • Top/bottom radiator hose - not really necessary, can improvise with aluminium can and duct tape.
  • Can of body filler, (good for repairing holes in radiator cores).
  • Approximately 40 metres of 12mm nylon rope.
  • A load of cable ties small -> big.
  • First aid kit.
  • Matches, hexamine stove.
  • Analog multimeter.
  • Duct tape.
  • Aluminium frypan - not just for cooking, have repaired an exhaust using this and fencing wire :)
  • Aluminium billy.
  • Puncture kit.

Apart from water if traveling into desert/arid area, that's pretty much it.  Anything else can be scavenged from the bush, eg. fencing wire, etc.

MilesAhead

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2016, 09:10:09 PM »
Since I got rid of my roll-around toolbox and its contents years ago(to discourage me from accepting yet another job as a mechanic) if I bought a new car the most important items in my emergency kit would be:

a) charged cell phone
b) charged debit card
c) jazz tunes to listen to while waiting for the service vehicle to arrive.  :)

holt

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2016, 09:32:10 PM »
For major auto accident injuries to help control massive bleeding, a package of maxie size feminine hygiene pads (recommended to me once by a former Green Beret).
Temporary fix for minor radiator leaks; a can of black pepper.
Chemically luminescent plastic light sticks that you bend to break the inner glass vial and shake to give a greenish light that's good for several hours, is non-electric and safe around gasoline spills, and waterproof; also some dark tape to cover one side so you don't blind yourself.
One or more 'space blankets'.
One of those little fold-up Army shovels; you can alternate between jacking the stuck car tire up a little at a time, and putting dirt under the tire, jacking it up some more, add more dirt, going back and forth alternately, to dig your car out of a deep rut or ditch; also a long narrow section of old carpet for traction.
A can of carburetor spray, and one of ether easy engine start spray, road flares, spare tire in a can aerosol can.
I read somewhere that if a person wants to pull over off the side of a road and sleep off 'one drink too many' while remaining in the vehicle, they can still charge you with a technical DUI if the car keys are in the car, so the suggestion was to put the keys on the road under the car; don't know how good the advice is, and I don't drink; so comment--anyone?
BTW your car is a beaut. :)
"This is the best bad idea we have, sir. By far." (cf. 'Argo'.)
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 09:42:26 PM by holt »

Stephen66515

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2016, 12:20:30 AM »
Chemically luminescent plastic light sticks that you bend to break the inner glass vial and shake to give a greenish light that's good for several hours, is non-electric and safe around gasoline spills, and waterproof

Longest description ever for a "Glow Stick" haha

OMFG *FacePalm* You have got to be kidding me?!?

NEVER Trust a Sensor to do an EyeBalls job!



Oh, don't get me wrong...I'll be keeping an eye on it, but those sensors will be handy for checking levels without having to go to the vehicle (I'm lazy!)


I read somewhere that if a person wants to pull over off the side of a road and sleep off 'one drink too many' while remaining in the vehicle, they can still charge you with a technical DUI if the car keys are in the car, so the suggestion was to put the keys on the road under the car; don't know how good the advice is, and I don't drink; so comment--anyone?

I was under the impression this is only if the keys are in the ignition (same as the UK), in the same sense as you could get charged with "Intention to drive without a license" if you have the engine running whilst in the drivers seat, and don't have a license (also the same if you are on the phone and have the engine running/are in gear) - It's safer just to turn off the engine and put the keys in your pocket IMHO...If you put the keys outside the vehicle, you risk them getting stolen or lost (sudden heavy rain could easily wash them away)

BTW your car is a beaut.

Thanks :)

4wd

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2016, 01:02:23 AM »
I read somewhere that if a person wants to pull over off the side of a road and sleep off 'one drink too many' while remaining in the vehicle, they can still charge you with a technical DUI if the car keys are in the car, so the suggestion was to put the keys on the road under the car; don't know how good the advice is, and I don't drink; so comment--anyone?

I was under the impression this is only if the keys are in the ignition (same as the UK), in the same sense as you could get charged with "Intention to drive without a license" if you have the engine running whilst in the drivers seat, and don't have a license (also the same if you are on the phone and have the engine running/are in gear) - It's safer just to turn off the engine and put the keys in your pocket IMHO...If you put the keys outside the vehicle, you risk them getting stolen or lost (sudden heavy rain could easily wash them away)

It seems to be, as usual, a matter of intent and interpretation:

Quote
Being Drunk in Charge of a Motor Vehicle

The offence of being Drunk in Charge is committed if:

“a person is in charge of any motor vehicle on a road or other public place after consuming so much alcohol that the proportion of it in his breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit he is guilty of an offence”

Whether or not a person is in charge of a motor vehicle is or the facts of each individual case, the key question being whether the person is in control of the vehicle and whether in the circumstances there is a realistic possibility of him taking control of the vehicle. These cases will usually arise in circumstances where a motorist who is above the prescribed limit is found inside a car, but is not driving. The unwitting motorist can easily stumble into this situation, where they enter their car for the purpose of sleeping or with the intention of removing belongings.

holt

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2016, 04:42:26 PM »
Chemically luminescent plastic light sticks that you bend to break the inner glass vial and shake to give a greenish light that's good for several hours, is non-electric and safe around gasoline spills, and waterproof
Longest description ever for a "Glow Stick"
Oh yes, one of those, too. :)
"This is the best bad idea we have, sir. By far." (cf. 'Argo'.)

holt

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #15 on: February 08, 2016, 12:03:52 AM »
A fluorescent orange sleeveless vest with reflective tape.
"This is the best bad idea we have, sir. By far." (cf. 'Argo'.)

CWuestefeld

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2016, 12:45:29 PM »
Echoing some, and adding a few new items, this is everything that's currently in my wife's car, which we use for roadtrips:
  • First aid kit is a necessity, including bandaids, analgesic, antihistamine (not just colds and allergies, but also helps motion sickness)
  • LED flashlight
  • Phone charger cable for cigarette lighter
  • Little packs of cookies, peanut butter crackers, etc. (for when hypoglycemia makes you sleepy), a couple of water bottles
  • Old-fashioned paper maps
  • Space blankets, knife, cig lighters, little sewing kit like they have in some hotel rooms
  • Fix-a-flat, and tire pressure gauge. Know where your jack and lug wrench are stowed, and how to use them!
  • Battery for emergency start. Remember to recharge occasionally. Know where your battery lives.
  • Jumper cables. As said before, make sure you've got heavy gauge, etc.
  • Reflective triangle warning signs, reflective safety vest.
  • Bungie cords, some rope or 550 cord.
  • Dry gas (when water gets in the tank)
  • Hand-held CB radio (for long trips - cell phones still don't work in the middle of nowhere)
  • Hiking sticks, bug spray, ground cover ('cause you never know when you're gonna want to hike and have a picnic)
  • Mouse poison (they're always getting into the car, and with those cookies and things...)
  • Dehydrated water (just seeing if anybody's paying attention)

tomos

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2016, 12:58:45 PM »
Mouse poison (they're always getting into the car, and with those cookies and things...)
I usually keep something sweet in the car and was wondering lately about animals trying to get into it -- round here I'd guess the martens keep the mice at bay and either arent able to get into the car, or arent bothered (they more interested in chewing cables in my experience).

Dehydrated water (just seeing if anybody's paying attention)
just add water :-)
Tom

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2016, 02:49:54 PM »
I usually keep something sweet in the car and was wondering lately about animals trying to get into it...

For the past few years I keep finding frogs - like 5 or 6 at a time - in my truck. I really don't know why they're attracted to it ... Maybe because it's parked more often than not. But every time I get into it there's at least 1 or 2 of them in there.

mouser

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #19 on: February 14, 2016, 10:17:22 PM »
Make sure you have a window scraper in case your windshield ices over.

holt

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2016, 11:08:43 PM »
Paper copies of Boy Scout and Girl Scout manuals, which are full of sensible survival information. There may be vintage 'best editions' which those 'in the know' may hold consensus of opinion are to be sought after even as used copies, but any edition is worth keeping handy in a heavy-duty 'freezer' zip-lock baggie.
A box of heavy duty trash bags for keeping critical items dry.
I might also mention an umbrella, to protect you from the sun in hot climes; I prefer black, because I've tried light colors before, and it is no fun standing under the glare of an off-white umbrella in the desert with a borderline heat stroke headache and wishing you had got the black one for the superior relief from eye strain. Just a normal size is fine; it is very fatiguing to fight the wind holding a really large size.
"This is the best bad idea we have, sir. By far." (cf. 'Argo'.)

CWuestefeld

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2016, 11:05:28 AM »
Speaking of books... we keep in my wife's car, the one we use for road trips, a book called "Next Exit". This lists the Interstate highways in each state, and for each, the exits in order. Each exit lists what services are available off that exit - any fast food, gas, hotels, etc. For really long trips (like when we moved from NJ to TX) this really helps in figuring out how far to go before stopping for gas, and where we should stop for the night.

IainB

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2016, 11:38:57 PM »
@CWuestefeld: "Next Exit" sounds like a seriously useful - if not essential - touring aid.

x16wda

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2016, 05:25:28 AM »
So after looking at all these excellent recommendations, something like this looks like a good bet too (assuming your "in" includes "on")...

clipimage.jpgIn-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
vi vi vi - editor of the beast

tomos

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2016, 05:37:22 AM »
Stephen,
I think you'll need a bigger car ;)
Tom