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Author Topic: You Want Targeted Ads!  (Read 1158 times)

Tinman57

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You Want Targeted Ads!
« on: April 20, 2013, 08:05:28 PM »

  Yeah, we're going to believe the fox that wants to guard the henhouse. We've seen how the marketers play dirty tricks to spy on us in the past and present. Send ads, that's ok, just quit tracking my movements online and trying to serve up what YOU think I'm interested in.....

Quote
Survey: Internet users like targeted ads, free content

Internet users overwhelmingly enjoy free Web content supported by advertising, and they'd rather see advertisements targeted toward their interests than random ads, according to a survey released this week by the Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA).

http://www.pcworld.c...ds-free-content.html

xtabber

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Re: You Want Targeted Ads!
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2013, 09:05:37 PM »
This so-called "Poll" provides a textbook example of how to frame questions to get answers you can use to prove whatever you want.

Of course, it comes from Zogby, long known in the survey research field for phony polling. ABC News, among others, has a policy against quoting Zogby polls in news articles because they are not credible.

This clip from the British TV series Yes Prime Minister provides a very funny example of how this is done.

barney

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Re: You Want Targeted Ads!
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2013, 09:10:52 PM »
Interesting, albeit somewhat unbelievable  :o, article.  Comments, methinks, were better than the article  ;).  The article fails to mention, of course, the transactions whereby the tracking information is sold to other marketers kinda goes unmentioned, as does the reliability/reputation of those buying marketers.  As well, I'd kinda like to see the bona fides of the pollsters, ya know?

Edit
'Nother post snuck in while I was composing, but I'll let this stand.

TaoPhoenix

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Re: You Want Targeted Ads!
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2013, 12:35:07 AM »

"how to frame questions" indeed. You can even get me to say yes if you set up the question sequence like this:

1. Do you want to pay for content or have it free supported by ads? They say ads.
2. Now that you are saying that you want it ad supported, which would you prefer to have the ad be for: Baby Diapers or SciFi webzines?


barney

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Re: You Want Targeted Ads!
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2013, 12:50:53 AM »
Old [Aristotlean] logic problem:
Nothing's better than ice cream;
crackers are better than nothing;
(conclusion) crackers are better than ice cream.

That pretty well epitomizes the argument.  Logic, as with statistics, can be manipulated to do/mean almost anything.  If you're/they're smart enough to phrase the right question, the desired answer is about 98% assured.  And there are a number of folk around who have studied how to phrase that question.

Tinman57

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Re: You Want Targeted Ads!
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2013, 07:56:20 PM »
This so-called "Poll" provides a textbook example of how to frame questions to get answers you can use to prove whatever you want.

Of course, it comes from Zogby, long known in the survey research field for phony polling. ABC News, among others, has a policy against quoting Zogby polls in news articles because they are not credible.

This clip from the British TV series Yes Prime Minister provides a very funny example of how this is done.

  I did not know that!  You done taught an old dog something new.   ;)