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Author Topic: Local History Tape Archive - need help  (Read 1664 times)

JennyB

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Local History Tape Archive - need help
« on: February 08, 2011, 04:02:12 AM »
I have inherited a collection of over 100 tapes of interviews and talks from the local history society. They were recorded on a cheap cassette recorder, so the sound quality is ... variable.

What's the best strategy for cataloguing and archiving the usable portions on disc for transcription and/or compilation onto a CD?
If you don't see how it can fail -
you haven't understood it properly.

40hz

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Re: Local History Tape Archive - need help
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2011, 07:58:26 AM »
There's several things I could suggest, but a better answer might come by talking to your town librarians. Info mapping, cataloging, data classification, storage and retrieval are their specialty. And they're also probably the most underutilized talent pool in the country.

If the early creators of the web involved professional librarians up front, things would probably be far less chaotic than they are today.

If you're in a small town whose library is primarily staffed by well-intentioned volunteers, you may need to head over to the next larger municipality (or college) to find someone with a LibSci degree who can help you.

I've involved librarians on several volunteer and paid projects I've worked on. Maybe I'm just lucky, but I found all of them to be extremely knowledgeable and helpful.

Pretty cool people too! So much for the stereotype...

And their expertise isn't restricted to books. I found one expert in government publications, and another who knew video formats and conversion methodologies inside out. She's the first person that ever explained what a codec does in a way that made sense to me.

I also wound up acquiring some new personal friends in the process. Apparently info-squirrel/book-lover types bond very quickly.

I suggest you pay them a call. :Thmbsup:

 8)
« Last Edit: February 08, 2011, 08:03:14 AM by 40hz »

JennyB

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Re: Local History Tape Archive - need help
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2011, 12:14:10 PM »
Thanks, I'll do that!
If you don't see how it can fail -
you haven't understood it properly.

rjbull

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Re: Local History Tape Archive - need help
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2011, 01:54:37 PM »
There's several things I could suggest, but a better answer might come by talking to your town librarians. Info mapping, cataloging, data classification, storage and retrieval are their specialty. And they're also probably the most underutilized talent pool in the country.

They're an endangered species in Britain.  Brutal "cuts" to balance the UK budget means county councils are seeing libraries as a soft target.  Library users are protesting, as well we should.

40hz

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Re: Local History Tape Archive - need help
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2011, 02:02:05 PM »
There's several things I could suggest, but a better answer might come by talking to your town librarians. Info mapping, cataloging, data classification, storage and retrieval are their specialty. And they're also probably the most underutilized talent pool in the country.

They're an endangered species in Britain.  Brutal "cuts" to balance the UK budget means county councils are seeing libraries as a soft target.  Library users are protesting, as well we should.

Gracious! Cutting back on libraries? Well...England Prevails! as the saying goes. :huh: