Home | Blog | Software | Reviews and Features | Forum | Help | Donate | About us
topbanner_forum
  *

avatar image

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
  • December 04, 2016, 04:34:55 PM
  • Proudly celebrating 10 years online.
  • Donate now to become a lifetime supporting member of the site and get a non-expiring license key for all of our programs.
  • donate

Last post Author Topic: Acceptable expletives  (Read 18112 times)

cranioscopical

  • Friend of the Site
  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 4,367
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Acceptable expletives
« on: August 17, 2007, 09:42:24 AM »

At times I am forced to eschew my favourite Anglo-Saxon oaths.
In what passes round here for polite company I still have a need to express extreme frustration, and there are times when "Oh bother!" just doesn't seem to cut it.

When hard pressed, my expression of choice is "Castor and Pollux." 
For example,
Castor and Pollux!  The data say that we have been wrong all along!
So, your mother is coming to stay for a week... Castor and Pollux!"

On what favourite expressions do others rely?


Darwin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,984
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2007, 09:56:57 AM »
I quite like "cinders and ash" from Thomas the Tank Engine. Then there's the old standby "fudge and bannna peels". Sadly, I use neither. I don't know what comes out of my mouth in polite company, or rather, I never know what will come out of my mouth in polite company... I improvise. Castor and pollux is nice, though - I might use it!
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

katykaty

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 221
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2007, 02:17:39 PM »
I know someone who renamed his kitten 'Cooking Fat' in celebration of the number of times she was standing exactly where he wanted to step while holding a tray of hot food.  ;)

tomos

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 10,319
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2007, 02:38:52 PM »
castor & pollux sounds like a nice bit of cockney rhyming slang

My mum used to say "Christopher Columbus!", doesnt quite cut it does it  :) -
but for her (very religious) it was the nearest to "Christ!" she could get!

I think there's a few you'd get away with depending how polite the company is.
Is "feck it" used in the states/canada?
Sort of, well, definetly less unnacceptable than the other version.
Or just "shag it", but I suppose that's not too polite either  :D

Funny in german the word "scheiße" (scheisse) is quite acceptable whereas in english not so much..
Tom

mitzevo

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 462
  • Control is power
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2007, 02:45:12 PM »
I always use "Where is my cheese?", "God I love my cheese", "Pleaes help me find it"..  interchangeably.

 ;D

The clock is running. Make the most of today. Time waits for no man. Yesterday is history. Tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift. That's why it is called the present.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2007, 02:55:45 PM by mitzevo »

Eóin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 1,401
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2007, 02:49:57 PM »
For me it's got to be smeg! :D

Darwin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,984
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2007, 03:03:21 PM »
Quote
Funny in german the word "scheiße" (scheisse) is quite acceptable whereas in english not so much..

Yes - same in Korean "doh-ng" and "doh-ng-shim" (my transliteration skills are negligible) are
terms used by everyone from toddlers to the senile and everyone in between... Doh-ng = excrement and Doh-ng shim its point of egress from the body  :D

"Feck" it is not in general usage, at least in my part of NA. Similarly, "shag" is only used to describe the pile in a carpet or the state of someone's hair (The "Shaggy" DA, for example). Snog, to my knowledge (I know, off topic now) isn't even in our vocabularly - I was scrambling for it's meaning when my Welsh cousin mentioned someone trying to "snog" her at a party.
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

cranioscopical

  • Friend of the Site
  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 4,367
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2007, 07:04:52 PM »
Quote
tomos: Or just "shag it", but I suppose that's not too polite either
It's probably totally polite round these parts. I should use it more. As Darwin says it hasn't the same meaning here.  :)

Quote
Darwin: Snog, to my knowledge isn't even in our vocabularly
That reminds me of when I first arrived on these shores.
Smoking was prevalent in those days, and contemporary U.K. slang for a cigarette was a 'fag.'

It was a conversation stopper in various boardrooms when I'd ask, "Can I offer anyone a fag?"

Needless to say, I still have many ways to further my reputation as a Limey nitwit.

BigJim

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2007
  • **
  • Posts: 178
  • I have seen the light!
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2007, 10:28:42 PM »
 
Quote
castor & pollux sounds like a nice bit of cockney rhyming slang

From Wordsmyth:"In Greek mythology, the twin brothers of Helen, one mortal and the other immortal."

From BritSlang: ("Castor & Pollux=Bollocks")"The names of the twins of Gemni are transfered to the twins of the ball bag"

TruckerJim says "You can go down a hill too slow a thousand times. But too fast only once."
« Last Edit: August 18, 2007, 02:29:54 PM by BigJim »

cranioscopical

  • Friend of the Site
  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 4,367
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2007, 11:06:23 PM »
Quote
Quote
castor & pollux sounds like a nice bit of cockney rhyming slang

From Wordsmyth:"In Greek mythology, the twin brothers of Helen, one mortal and the other immortal."

From BritSlang: "The names of the twins of Gemni are transfered to the twins of the ball bag"

And they do have that star quality...

Darwin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,984
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2007, 12:10:38 AM »
Quote
And they do have that star quality...

 :D
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

tomos

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 10,319
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2007, 08:40:38 AM »
 ;D ;D ;D (for the whole thread)
Tom

iphigenie

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 1,169
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2007, 12:13:31 PM »
people used to make fun of me for saying "darn" - they thought it was so quaint. After 10 years around people who swore a lot i have picked up a few, but am working on it.

As an expletive I tend to use the equivalent of %$^^£%^*&N$^@ - i.e. a non verbal gmblzzttt!! type noise.  let people fill in the blanks if they get offended it's from what is in their head not what I said.

PS: Unless in an argument with my other half - then it's all the nasties like in the worst gangster film  :-[

Darwin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,984
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2007, 01:15:05 PM »
Quote
PS: Unless in an argument with my other half - then it's all the nasties like in the worst gangster film 

Fargin bastiges and the like?
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin
« Last Edit: August 23, 2007, 03:57:42 PM by Darwin »

Edvard

  • Coding Snacks Author
  • Charter Honorary Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 2,888
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2007, 03:22:42 PM »
I seem to have adopted the word "Smoke" to replace expletives in most forms, which began happening after I did some work repairing electronics and the phrase "you let the smoke out!" came into my vocabulary with some regularity.
Hence:
Aw smokes; Smoke it!; Holy smokes; What kinda smoke are you blowing at me?; et cetera

Darwin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,984
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #15 on: August 24, 2007, 01:54:19 PM »
Finally got to use "castor and pollux" - thanks Chris!
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

cranioscopical

  • Friend of the Site
  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 4,367
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #16 on: August 24, 2007, 03:55:54 PM »
Finally got to use "castor and pollux" - thanks Chris!

Good to know it has its uses but I like Edvard's "Smoke."  After all, there's no smoke without the 'f' word.

Darwin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,984
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #17 on: August 24, 2007, 05:04:03 PM »
Quote
After all, there's no smoke without the 'f' word.

"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

allen

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 1,192
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #18 on: August 24, 2007, 06:01:46 PM »
I curse like a sailor (Poor Deozaan when chatting with me drunk...), but in my defense was one. :)


I've been known to, on occasion, substitute with <insert explitive here> -- both in speak and type.  Naturally I lose the angle brackets when speaking.

ala

For <insert explitive here>'s sake . . . I get way too much <insert explitive here> spam.

Darwin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,984
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2007, 06:08:36 PM »
Quote
For <insert explitive here>'s sake . . . I get way too much <insert explitive here> spam.
=

Quote
For Pete's sake . . . I get way too much wonderul spam.

??
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

Cpilot

  • Charter Honorary Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 293
    • View Profile
    • Bite Notes
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2007, 07:03:29 PM »
What's wrong with "poopie"?
As in "aww, poopie, I screwed up the $%#@mn &@#kin' thing again".  :mrgreen:

Perry Mowbray

  • N.A.N.Y. Organizer
  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 1,817
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2007, 07:04:00 AM »
Quote
For Pete's sake . . . I get way too much wonderul spam.

It's a good point: since when did Pete become an expletive? I love this explanation!

Funnily enough, also on that site is this interesting comment about obfuscating non-acceptable expletives by adding dashes to the words middle letters: eg: for Cpilot's benefit: p----e. Why do we do it? For four letter words, that are in such common usage, it's just as good as writing the full word (and just as offensive).

Darwin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,984
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2007, 09:35:27 AM »
 ;D I tried not to use "Pete" but it fit... I always thought "Pete" was St. Peter, but I like the itinerant farmer explanation (though it doesn't actually identify who Pete is or why his name is being invoked).

Anyway, I've often made a similar argument, Perry. Why bother being cutesy pie when everyone knows what you mean by a------ or "fudge and banana peels"? I mean, don't get me wrong, I find this quite useful now as my 5 year old is reading and my 3 year old is a linguistic sponge. Don't really need this kind of language coming out of their mouths at this age (that can wait for school to start for the 5 year old next week!). But this kind of language is so commonly used in the media, on playgrounds, and sadly in households now that it seems an affectation to avoid using it while substituting a word or a phrase that makes it obvious what our intent is in the first place! However, I look on it as leading by example. The words are out there and I use them  :-[ but I don't really want to teach my kids, or my friend's teenagers, that it's OK to use them in everyday language.

Ultimately, I feel it's a respect issue - most of the time, I'm able to avoid using this kind of language in mixed company and I do so because I respect that these words ARE offensive to many people and am sensitive to that. Example: I helped the neighbour's late teens/early 20's son troubleshoot a water pressure issue that was causing the seals on her hose bibs to blow out. I've never heard such prolific effing and blinding in my life and I was offended. Here I was, a somewhat older (OK "OLDER") person whom he had never met before and he was peppering his language with so many swear words that it was hard to pick out the non-swear words and figure out what he was trying to say (other than that he was exceptionally randy and wanted to have sex WITH the hose bibs, the wrenches, the water pressure gauge, a Hydrangea, and the cat - or so I inferred from his liberal reference to the act)! I found it overly familar, crass, inappropriate, rude, and insensitive. For all he knew, I could have been the parish priest! That I am far from it is entirely beside the point...  :-\ I think the key is familiarity - I think you need to someone before you can start talking a blue streak in front of them.
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

Perry Mowbray

  • N.A.N.Y. Organizer
  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 1,817
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2007, 10:07:50 AM »
;D I tried not to use "Pete" but it fit... I always thought "Pete" was St. Peter, but I like the itinerant farmer explanation (though it doesn't actually identify who Pete is or why his name is being invoked).

St Peter makes sense to me (when being sensible): the farmer just made such wonderful non-sense!!

Anyway, I've often made a similar argument, Perry. Why bother being cutesy pie when everyone knows what you mean by a------ or "fudge and banana peels"? I mean, don't get me wrong, I find this quite useful now as my 5 year old is reading and my 3 year old is a linguistic sponge. Don't really need this kind of language coming out of their mouths at this age (that can wait for school to start for the 5 year old next week!). But this kind of language is so commonly used in the media, on playgrounds, and sadly in households now that it seems an affectation to avoid using it while substituting a word or a phrase that makes it obvious what our intent is in the first place! However, I look on it as leading by example. The words are out there and I use them  :-[ but I don't really want to teach my kids, or my friend's teenagers, that it's OK to use them in everyday language.

Exactly: just doesn't make any sense. When you leave two letters out from a four letter word you would to have to not know the word, which means you could have used the word anyway for all those who don't know the word :-\

We are generally a family of non-swearers; my middle son finished high school with the reputation of the boy who didn't swear! So let me encourage you: I think the statistics show that kids are much more likely to pick up the family values than what they bump into at school or in the community.

Ultimately, I feel it's a respect issue - most of the time, I'm able to avoid using this kind of language in mixed company and I do so because I respect that these words ARE offensive to many people and am sensitive to that.

Excellent observation! When I try to figure out why I don't swear in front of people, part of the reason is that it's out of respect.

When I took my wife on to a building site I was doing I made all the contractors mind their language in her presence (which they did), and she was very thankful [power is a wonderful thing  :)].

It's interesting that you think it's familiarity, it may well be, but the person I am most familiar with I am also the most embarrassed when I do swear in front of... funny, eh?

Darwin

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,984
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: Acceptable expletives
« Reply #24 on: August 25, 2007, 10:16:49 AM »
Quote
It's interesting that you think it's familiarity, it may well be, but the person I am most familiar with I am also the most embarrassed when I do swear in front of... funny, eh?

Another excellent observation! It's the same for me...
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin