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Author Topic: Video: Rich Code for Tiny Computers: A Simple Commodore 64 Game in C++17  (Read 538 times)

Mark0

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A nice practical demonstration of the level of optimiziations and features of moderns C++ compilers:

« Last Edit: May 04, 2017, 03:02 PM by Mark0 »

mouser

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Just watched it.  Very nice.
We are always told how well compilers can optimize code, but it's nice to see just how seriously the C++ compilers take their job of optimizing code.

One of the other things that this video hammers home is how much of the new C++ language features are designed to help the programmer write in verbose, elegant, human-readable object oriented code, while at the same time helping the compiler to optimize most of that away into nothingness.

Deozaan

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Nice little "May the 4th" cameo, too. :Thmbsup:

f0dder

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That is absolutely crazy, and super cool!

p3lb0x told me about the video a while ago, but didn't get around to watching it until now. The focus on zero-overhead abstractions in C++ is one of the extremely strong features of the language, and something I haven't really seen in other languages.

Oh, and translating x86 assembly to 6510? Pretty cool, even though it's just a subset - pretty interesting that it was more viable than a LLVM codegen :)