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Last post Author Topic: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations  (Read 3081 times)

Stephen66515

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2016, 09:48:57 AM »
Stephen,
I think you'll need a bigger car ;)

Looks like I'm going to need to go to: http://www.usedcoachsales.co.uk/ haha

MilesAhead

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #26 on: February 17, 2016, 04:54:26 PM »
So after looking at all these excellent recommendations, something like this looks like a good bet too (assuming your "in" includes "on")...

clipimage.jpgIn-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations

Or perhaps a fold up electric bicycle? (With an inflatable bike in the saddlebag in case the electric bike breaks down.)   :Thmbsup:

ttlurker

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #27 on: September 19, 2016, 11:19:17 AM »
A few disposable latex (or non latex) gloves can keep your hands clean and dry if you need to fill oil, or other fluids.
If you need to change your tires, a pad for kneeling or a couple of the pads used by flooring installers to strap on to your knees can help.
Some sort of traction pad or a container of kitty litter can help you get unstuck from ice or muddy situations.

mouser

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #28 on: September 19, 2016, 12:03:13 PM »
Quote
A few disposable latex (or non latex) gloves can keep your hands clean and dry if you need to fill oil, or other fluids.

i'm a huge fan of the 100 pack disposable latex gloves.  use them all the time around the house, etc.

likewise, your suggestion about the kneeling pads is also a good tip in general when you have to work on your knees (though carrying one in the car has too much of a size-to-benefit ratio to be worth it for me).
« Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 12:13:56 PM by mouser »

Arizona Hot

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2016, 01:36:54 PM »
if we go out at 2am and end up in Scotland or Wales (this happens way more often than you would think)

If you start out in America and end up in Scotland, you have definitely gotten lost. If you start out in America and end up in China, who will believe you even if they can understand you. If you start out from home and later notice 2 moons in the sky, give up all hope of getting home.

« Last Edit: September 27, 2016, 01:43:11 PM by Arizona Hot »

wraith808

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #30 on: September 27, 2016, 02:32:28 PM »
I know you said multi-tool, but to be more explicit about a few tools that many don't think about until its too late - window breaker, seatbelt cutter, and pry bar.

MilesAhead

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #31 on: September 27, 2016, 06:21:23 PM »
I know you said multi-tool, but to be more explicit about a few tools that many don't think about until its too late - window breaker, seatbelt cutter, and pry bar.

Don't forget the acetylene torch in case you have to burn your way out!  :)

4wd

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #32 on: September 27, 2016, 08:28:51 PM »
I know you said multi-tool, but to be more explicit about a few tools that many don't think about until its too late - window breaker, seatbelt cutter, and pry bar.

Don't forget the acetylene torch in case you have to burn your way out!  :)

And don't forget to put them in the boot since they're not the kind of things you want flying around in the cabin during an accident.   :P

MilesAhead

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Re: In-Car Emergency Kit - Your Recommendations
« Reply #33 on: Today at 06:56:56 AM »
I know you said multi-tool, but to be more explicit about a few tools that many don't think about until its too late - window breaker, seatbelt cutter, and pry bar.

Don't forget the acetylene torch in case you have to burn your way out!  :)

And don't forget to put them in the boot since they're not the kind of things you want flying around in the cabin during an accident.   :P

For some reason all I can think of is Ford Pinto.  The remarkable engineering feat of having the top of the gas tank and the floor of the trunk one piece of metal.  That one case made Gerry Spence a household name(at least after the 60 minutes show profiled him.)  Speaking of compressed gases in the trunk, a guy I worked with who scuba dived as a hobby claimed he had a tank let go on him one time.  He said it borrowed 8 feet into the sand by the time the pressure was exhausted.