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Last post Author Topic: Do we have any musical people on DC?  (Read 59803 times)

wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #275 on: March 30, 2016, 01:23:07 PM »
So, all day I sit at a computer- diagramming, designing, programming, meetings... and during lunch I either go out with co-workers or, most often, heat up something in the microwave and sit at my desk surfing the internet, or more likely, more of the programming thing.

I just got a traveler guitar on massdrop- figured I could play during lunch.  I've had a Vox for a while, but the strat was just too much to carry around with it for me, so it's sat mostly unused.  Paired those with my monitors, got a table on the quad at work, and just sat and played.  It was the most refreshed I've felt after lunch in a long while.

Just had to share that experience.  Playing the traveler is definitely something you have to get used to.  But the freedom you get, and the renewal you feel being able to play anywhere... definitely worth the adjustment.

40hz

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #276 on: March 30, 2016, 05:37:05 PM »
@wraith - I'm not big on most travel type guitars or basses, but for a super small form factor guitar, I really like the G Sharp Instruments G# Guitar.

It's a tiny guitar that's a legit instrument in it's own right rather than just a hack to keep it small. Got a chance to try one out and it's definitely worth getting IMO. $375 USD delivered.





Get a set of headphones and one of these and you can rock out anywhere.  :Thmbsup:

« Last Edit: March 30, 2016, 05:43:17 PM by 40hz »

IainB

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #277 on: April 04, 2016, 12:31:03 AM »
One reason I like music is because it is so beautifully logical - especially most classical music and religious music (including choral music, most of which I enjoy singing and listening to a great deal).
Good post about that here: The Math Behind Beethoven’s Music

- and one of the commenters posted a useful link to a copy of Science and Music, by Sir James Jeans.

IainB

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Musical people on DC? An hour of singing a day makes you healthier.
« Reply #278 on: April 06, 2016, 05:30:29 AM »
Though I invariably found it a tremendously satisfying and uplifting experience, I had never previously associated all my choir-singing rehearsals and performance work as possibly being conducive to a healthier lifestyle, so this initially surprised me quite a bit, but then I thought "Well of course it could be!":

An hour of singing a day could help body fight against serious ilnesses | Daily Mail Online
Quote
  • Singing reduces stress hormones, such as cortisol, and boosts mood
  • Reducing anxiety takes strain off immune system so it can fight disease
  • People with depression experienced the greatest mood improvement
  • The research suggests singing in a choir could help put cancer patients in the best possible position to receive treatment and stop tumours returning
By Ben Spencer for the Daily Mail
Published: 23:46 GMT, 4 April 2016 | Updated: 08:08 GMT, 5 April 2016

Singing in a choir boosts the immune system and even helps the body fight cancer, according to research.

Scientists found that just one hour of singing significantly increased levels of the immune proteins that the body uses to battle serious illnesses including cancer.

Experts have long known that singing improves mood.

But the new research, conducted by scientists at Imperial College London, University College London and the Royal College of Music, found that it also has a profound impact on the immune system.
Singing in a choir boosts the immune system and even helps the body fight cancer, according to research conducted by Imperial College London, University College London and the Royal College of Music

Singing in a choir boosts the immune system and even helps the body fight cancer, according to research conducted by Imperial College London, University College London and the Royal College of Music

The team found that singing for an hour resulted in significant reductions in stress hormones, such as cortisol, and increases in cytokines, immune proteins that boost the body’s ability to fight serious illness.

Doctors suspect that reducing stress and anxiety takes strain off the immune system, allowing it to better use its resources at fighting disease.

The research raises the possibility that singing in a choir could help to put cancer patients in the best possible position to receive treatment and stop tumours from returning afterwards.

The project, which was funded by the Tenovus Cancer Care charity, tested 193 members of five different choirs in Cardiff, Bridgend, Pontypridd, Cwmbran and Swansea.

Of the participants, 55 had cancer.

Choir members gave samples of their saliva before an hour of singing, and then again just after. The samples were analysed to see what changes occurred in levels of hormones and immune proteins.

The study, published in the journal ECancer Medical Science, also found that people who were suffering most from depression experienced greatest mood improvement.

Levels of inflammation in the body, which is known to impede the immune system, were also lowered.

Dr Ian Lewis, director of research and policy at Tenovus Cancer Care and co-author of the research, said: ‘These are really exciting findings.

‘We have been building a body of evidence over the past six years to show that singing in a choir can have a range of social, emotional and psychological benefits, and now we can see it has biological effects too.

‘We’ve long heard anecdotal evidence that singing in a choir makes people feel good, but this is the first time it’s been demonstrated that the immune system can be affected by singing. It’s really exciting and could enhance the way we support people with cancer in the future.’
Scientists found that just one hour of singing significantly increased levels of the immune proteins that the body uses to battle serious illnesses including cancer

Scientists found that just one hour of singing significantly increased levels of the immune proteins that the body uses to battle serious illnesses including cancer

Dr Daisy Fancourt, research associate at the Centre for Performance Science, a partnership between the Royal College of Music and Imperial College London, added: ‘Many people affected by cancer can experience psychological difficulties such as stress, anxiety and depression.

Research has demonstrated that these can suppress immune activity, at a time when patients need as much support as they can get from their immune system.

‘This research is exciting as it suggests that an activity as simple as singing could reduce some of this stress-induced suppression, helping to improve wellbeing and quality of life among patients and put them in the best position to receive treatment.’

This research is exciting as it suggests that an activity as simple as singing could reduce some of this stress-induced suppression

Diane Raybould, 64, a breast cancer patient who took part in the study, has been singing with the Bridgend Sing with Us choir since 2010.

She said: ‘Singing in the choir is about more than just enjoyment, it genuinely makes you feel better.

‘The choir leaders play a huge part of course, but so does the support of the other choir members, the inspirational programme and uplifting songs.

‘The choir is a family, simple as that. Having cancer and losing someone to cancer can be very isolating. With the choir, you can share experiences openly and that is hugely important.’

Co-author Rosie Dow, head of Sing with Us project at Tenovus Cancer Care, added: ‘This research is so exciting, as it echoes everything all our choir members tell us about how singing has helped them.

‘I’ve seen peoples’ lives transformed through singing in our choirs so knowing that singing also makes a biological difference will hopefully help us to reach more people with the message that singing is great for you - mind, body and soul.’

jessegilbert1

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #279 on: April 12, 2016, 04:23:32 AM »
Just wondering if any of you guys can sing, play guitar, piano...anything musical really!

If so...why not let all all hear you?!  Would love to hear/see some recordings of you guys!

~Stephen

Yip http://jessegilbert.com/music/I mix beats but seeing as I probably can't make a fulltime living from it I got into software dev.

Part of the use for my software is for brainstorming and devising lyrics and I'm trying to get musicians into it.

Working on some new features for song dev too.
The Fastest Desktop Thesaurus Software. Guaranteed. Free Version for download >> http://www.brainstormpro.com

40hz

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #280 on: April 20, 2016, 03:13:57 PM »
This is a little specialized and directed at bass players, modders and builders.

A gentleman in Germany who goes by the name of Cadfael has published in PDF format (and free of charge), a labor of what can only be described as love. He modestly calls it his Small Collection of Schematics for Passive Electric Basses.

I'm not sure what's small about it. It contains over 350 different wiring diagrams and schematics (historic and modded) for wiring, repairing, or rewiring an electric bass guitar. And it runs to 487 pages in its current (and probably last) incarnation.

This is a truly valuable resource and is very professionally done. Nothing like the usual half-assed and frequently inaccurate diagrams you'll find in most guitar wiring collections. The text is in German. But it's easy enough to follow. And where it isn't, a quick and dirty translation via Google or another online translation site will do ya. There's not a lot that needs be said most times since wiring diagrams and schematics are fairly standardized worldwide.

Here's a sample of what you can expect at 50% actual size:

Screenshot - 4_20_2016 , 4_11_38 PM.pngDo we have any musical people on DC?

To visit his English page (download link for PDF is at the bottom of the page) look here.


Edvard

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #281 on: April 20, 2016, 08:14:41 PM »
Very nice!  Reminds me of the Artec general wiring book for guitar, which though limited in scope, the diagrams are well laid-out and handy as a basic reference when repairing an off-the shelf axe.  I just wish it was as full-featured as Mr. Cadfael's, though.  :(
http://www.artecsoun...ng/wiring_book01.pdf

wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #282 on: April 21, 2016, 12:26:34 PM »
A bad year for music.  First Bowie, and now Prince.  Two innovators in music in the same year.   :(

40hz

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #283 on: April 21, 2016, 01:37:42 PM »
A bad year for music.  First Bowie, and now Prince.  Two innovators in music in the same year.   :(

So it goes.…

And for some odd reason, I get the feeling that the bad news for 'this year in music' isn't over yet.

Hope I'm wrong about that.

tomos

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #284 on: April 21, 2016, 03:31:00 PM »
A bad year for music.  First Bowie, and now Prince.  Two innovators in music in the same year.   :(

wow, that was a surprise  :(

EDIT// realised that might have sounded a bit flippant. I really was stunned by that one, I guess because of his age, and not having heard of any illness etc.
Tom
« Last Edit: April 21, 2016, 03:56:04 PM by tomos »

wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #285 on: April 21, 2016, 04:37:10 PM »
A bad year for music.  First Bowie, and now Prince.  Two innovators in music in the same year.   :(

wow, that was a surprise  :(

EDIT// realised that might have sounded a bit flippant. I really was stunned by that one, I guess because of his age, and not having heard of any illness etc.

He apparently had shown signs- but without a cause of death, they aren't really conclusive.

On April 14th, he was supposed to do a concert in Atlanta.  Canceled it, but then did a little set to make up for it.  It was low key for him.  Flew home, and made an emergency stop in Chicago at the hospital.  It was apparently the flu, from his publicist.  Headed home, and was recovering.  The police found him in the elevator in his residence, so people are presuming it was complications from that.  Flu kills older people, so it makes sense.  But still sad.

Deozaan

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #286 on: April 21, 2016, 06:04:24 PM »
Flu kills older people, so it makes sense.

Is 57 considered "older" these days? I thought 50 was the new 35. Or all the marketing departments just lying in an attempt to appeal to the baby boomer generation?


wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #287 on: April 21, 2016, 06:13:49 PM »
Flu kills older people, so it makes sense.

Is 57 considered "older" these days? I thought 50 was the new 35. Or all the marketing departments just lying in an attempt to appeal to the baby boomer generation?

Biology and Physiology don't subscribe to anything but science.

Deozaan

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #288 on: April 21, 2016, 07:25:17 PM »
Flu kills older people, so it makes sense.

Is 57 considered "older" these days? I thought 50 was the new 35. Or all the marketing departments just lying in an attempt to appeal to the baby boomer generation?

Biology and Physiology don't subscribe to anything but science.

Science has made it so that people can live longer, healthier lives. So, considering the improvements in science and medicine, is 57 still considered "older" these days?

Patrick Stewart doesn't seem too old at 75. Christopher Lee, while definitely "older" was pretty active and accomplished up until he died last year at 93.

Of course, those may be outliers. But my point is that years are just numbers. There's nothing, biologically speaking, that says no matter our circumstances, health, diet, etc., that we are "old" at a certain number of years. The numbers seem to be trending higher (meaning people are still looking "young" and being healthy at increasing years). And while these things tend to vary wildly, most people I know in their 50s don't seem that old to me. But there are a lot of possible explanations for that.

And since "older" is a relative term which isn't well defined, you and I may have different ideas what it means to be an "older" person. Really that's probably the issue here. I didn't really mean anything by my comment about 50 being the new 35. I guess I was just surprised at 57 being considered "older" because to me it doesn't seem to fit my idea of an "older" person. Time for me to adjust my perspective. :)


wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #289 on: April 21, 2016, 07:54:33 PM »
Science has made it so that people can live longer, healthier lives. So, considering the improvements in science and medicine, is 57 still considered "older" these days?

In terms of the Flu?  Yes.

http://www.cdc.gov/f...t/disease/65over.htm

They say 65, but I've seen for quite a few that it starts getting bad in the late 50s.

Stoic Joker

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #290 on: April 22, 2016, 11:16:28 AM »
I didn't really mean anything by my comment about 50 being the new 35. I guess I was just surprised at 57 being considered "older" because to me it doesn't seem to fit my idea of an "older" person. Time for me to adjust my perspective.

Oh bullshit...there is nothing wrong with your perspective. 57 is older than 35 true...but it isn't older like people think of their grandparents being "older".

...Even if I am a grandfather at 51, that's different.. :D

wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #291 on: April 22, 2016, 12:04:21 PM »
I didn't really mean anything by my comment about 50 being the new 35. I guess I was just surprised at 57 being considered "older" because to me it doesn't seem to fit my idea of an "older" person. Time for me to adjust my perspective.

Oh bullshit...there is nothing wrong with your perspective. 57 is older than 35 true...but it isn't older like people think of their grandparents being "older".

...Even if I am a grandfather at 51, that's different.. :D


Once you get into the older middle age, you have to start thinking about it not as middle aged, but as older for certain medical things.  I wish I'd thought about it as such, and I'm not yet to the half-century mark.  It was a lot harder for me to get over a full fledged blowout of the flu last year, so I make sure I get the vaccine.  I got shingles (though I'd asked my stupid doctor about the vaccine a little before, and she said they don't give it to people my age), and now have post-herpetic neuralgia chronically because of it... when I could have just paid the money for the vaccine.  My brother in law (50-something) lost a good part of his vision because of it. 

It's that "I'm not old syndrome" that kills a lot of people younger than they need to be dead.  Especially in regards to going to the doctor regularly.

Stoic Joker

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #292 on: April 22, 2016, 01:13:22 PM »
I didn't really mean anything by my comment about 50 being the new 35. I guess I was just surprised at 57 being considered "older" because to me it doesn't seem to fit my idea of an "older" person. Time for me to adjust my perspective.

Oh bullshit...there is nothing wrong with your perspective. 57 is older than 35 true...but it isn't older like people think of their grandparents being "older".

...Even if I am a grandfather at 51, that's different.. :D


Once you get into the older upper middle age, you have to start thinking about it not as middle aged, but as older for certain medical things.

ftfy :D


I wish I'd thought about it as such, and I'm not yet to the half-century mark.

Really??? I thought you were a bit older than I am.


It was a lot harder for me to get over a full fledged blowout of the flu last year, so I make sure I get the vaccine.


I got vaccinated once back when I was 5 - Didn't like it much - haven't gone back.. ;)

Honestly I think genetics factors in to things much more than half the vaccines they push on people do. If you have a good immune system, you're most likely just fine. Despite just having had one, I seldom get colds and have never had the flu. I've also never had chickenpox, measles, or mumps ... My sister did. But not me.

And yes, I know I'm an odd case that shouldn't be used as advice for/by anyone, but...


It's that "I'm not old syndrome" that kills a lot of people younger than they need to be dead.  Especially in regards to going to the doctor regularly.

I'm old, but I'm not old ... and I've no interest in getting stuck on a bunch of pills by some quack that is "Practicing" medicine because they think I should be on something...for some reason...that's probably insurance billing related.

wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #293 on: April 22, 2016, 02:54:01 PM »
I'm old, but I'm not old ... and I've no interest in getting stuck on a bunch of pills by some quack that is "Practicing" medicine because they think I should be on something...for some reason...that's probably insurance billing related.

Yeah... I thought that way too.  But seeing the progression of deaths in the 40s made me rethink that, though I do scrutinize what they tell me.

40hz

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #294 on: April 23, 2016, 12:38:03 PM »
Flu kills older people, so it makes sense.

Is 57 considered "older" these days? I thought 50 was the new 35. Or all the marketing departments just lying in an attempt to appeal to the baby boomer generation?


"Age" is far more a state of mind than it is a state of grace. And life threatening medical issues can crop up at any age. Being young doesn't make you immune to it. Nor does being older guarantee you're going to become just another statistic. Genes, luck of the draw, quality of care received, degree of health education, speed of diagnosis, and the amount of responsibility you take for your own health all factor into the equation.

wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #295 on: April 24, 2016, 01:34:41 PM »
Man... more bad news for music.

Lonnie Mack, Blues-Rock Guitar Great, Dead at 74

http://www.rollingst...-dead-at-74-20160423

vrgrrl

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #296 on: April 24, 2016, 06:53:53 PM »
Yeah I have a music performance BFA in flute from undergrad. Then I play a little piano and am learning the guitar. I can also double on oboe.

wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #297 on: April 25, 2016, 11:08:21 AM »


Prince... and Miles Davis?  I'd never seen this before... circa 1987.

wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #298 on: April 25, 2016, 11:59:15 AM »
And for some odd reason, I get the feeling that the bad news for 'this year in music' isn't over yet.

"Me and Mrs. Jones" singer Billy Paul dies at age 81

Quote
Pop music fans may have only known Billy Paul for a single song, but what a song it was. And soul music fans will remember the much deeper catalog of soul and jazz recordings and live performances that kept Billy in our minds right until this sad day. He will be missed and remembered.

wraith808

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Re: Do we have any musical people on DC?
« Reply #299 on: April 25, 2016, 12:28:10 PM »
Interesting articles on Prince's fight with technology and the impetus of the "I want it now" generation.

Prince vs The Internet: Why His Fight For Art Mattered

Prince Makes King Move with Tidal [INTERVIEW]

Prince: ‘Transcendence. That’s what you want. When that happens – Oh, boy'

I'd never heard this stuff before.  Any thoughts on it?  Especially on album track order?