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Last post Author Topic: Adobe drops the gauntlet - going forward it's cloud - or nothing.  (Read 11903 times)

CWuestefeld

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Re: Adobe drops the gauntlet - going forward it's cloud - or nothing.
« Reply #50 on: May 09, 2013, 11:55:26 AM »
What does it really mean for software to be "in the cloud"?

Because I don't see anything interesting in Adobe's change, in terms of software architecture. So far as I can discern, the only things that are changing are:

  • Only available via download, no physical media
  • Auto-update via download
  • Change from a single payment perpetual license to a recurring subscription payment
  • Optional online storage of data (which we already have via tumblr, etc., anyway)

So it's a minor tweak to delivery, and a fundamental change in how you pay for it.

Given that, where are the benefits to the user that are so undeniable? The *only* benefit I can see is the convenience of automatic updates, but to me that's quite minor. It doesn't make the pricing model change undeniably better, and the once actual change is something that I'm not willing to pay any extra for.

mouser

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Re: Adobe drops the gauntlet - going forward it's cloud - or nothing.
« Reply #51 on: May 09, 2013, 12:09:53 PM »
Quote
Given that, where are the benefits to the user that are so undeniable?


You don't expect Adobe to admit that this change is entirely about increasing their profit margin do you?  It's only fair that they make up pretend reasons why this is really being done to benefit the user.

superboyac

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Re: Adobe drops the gauntlet - going forward it's cloud - or nothing.
« Reply #52 on: May 09, 2013, 12:30:52 PM »
What does it really mean for software to be "in the cloud"?

Because I don't see anything interesting in Adobe's change, in terms of software architecture. So far as I can discern, the only things that are changing are:

  • Only available via download, no physical media
  • Auto-update via download
  • Change from a single payment perpetual license to a recurring subscription payment
  • Optional online storage of data (which we already have via tumblr, etc., anyway)

So it's a minor tweak to delivery, and a fundamental change in how you pay for it.

Given that, where are the benefits to the user that are so undeniable? The *only* benefit I can see is the convenience of automatic updates, but to me that's quite minor. It doesn't make the pricing model change undeniably better, and the once actual change is something that I'm not willing to pay any extra for.
True.  Initially, it sounded like the software would be run through the browser or something.  Especially with the talk about HTML5 and what not.  But now, it sounds like you describe, basically same local installation and a different license verification technique.  I don't see how "cloud" is being used except for license transactions.  I guess if your work files are being synced online automatically, that's also part of the cloud.  But the question is, is the actual software running online or locally?  Fully cloud, to me, means I work on photoshop within firefox.  Meaning I didn't install anything on my computer.

superboyac

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Re: Adobe drops the gauntlet - going forward it's cloud - or nothing.
« Reply #53 on: May 09, 2013, 12:34:53 PM »
Yeah...I just looked up some videos about creative cloud.  It looks like a normal, local install of adobe stuff.  The only difference is some synchronization of your work files, digital delivery of installation files, and digital license stuff.  That's it.  very minor.  If you think about it, most of our third party tools work exactly the same way.  All the little sharewares we use don't come boxed, several offer cloud syncing services (e.g. MLO, Evernote) and licensing is verified through some online portal.

 8)

vlastimil

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Re: Adobe drops the gauntlet - going forward it's cloud - or nothing.
« Reply #54 on: May 09, 2013, 01:25:54 PM »
Perhaps we are concentrating too much on the present. The difference between the Adobe cloud solution and the classic boxed program is not so big now, but it may increase in the future. The subscription model will actually enable Adobe to be more flexible and lower development costs.

For example, they do not need to worry too much about backward compatibility, because paying users always have the latest version. New PSD files may be saved in compatibility mode so that they can be open in older Photoshops. Since there will not be older Photoshops (that matter) in a few years, backward compatibility won't be an issue for Adobe anymore.

A cloud solution also allows Adobe to be closer to the customers. Users will not have an option to not upgrade anymore and they will be forced to learn new things (and get feedback to Adobe). This may seem like a bad thing, but it is not. A community of users, who are frozen and refuse to learn anything new, is a big obstacle of innovation and is probably holding Adobe back right now.

40hz

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Re: Adobe drops the gauntlet - going forward it's cloud - or nothing.
« Reply #55 on: May 09, 2013, 02:20:42 PM »
To a certain extent, the whole "cloud" part of the announcement is a red herring. And about as substantial as a cloud - so it's an apt term in this context.

However, as CWuestefeld so neatly pointed out in an earlier post, it's a minor change in the delivery method and authorization mechanism for CS. But it's a seismic shift in the sales/pricing model. And that is what is really significant here.

What Adobe is saying is that their CS lineup is now only available as a monthly or annual rental.

Adobe can split hairs over definitions and terminology ("no, it's not a rental - it's software as a service") but what it basically comes down to is that the Creative Suite has now been put behind a paywall. And what makes this newsworthy is that Adobe is the first major vendor to do this with a de facto industry standard, non-enterprise, software title.

And if this move is accepted by Adobe's customer base, you'll see more and more software publishers follow in their footsteps.

Right now, Adobe has implemented this is a benign fashion. But down the road , who can guess what they might decide to do in the name of anti-piracy or whatever.

Adobex.jpg

At the very least, Adobe now has complete control of all CS sales. And the only price available is now list price. There will be no more hunting for bargains on E-Bay or sales outside of Adobe's absolute control. And more importantly, there will be no more used software titles sold - something software publishers have been looking to stop for many years - even though the US courts have generally not been receptive to non-transferable license clauses attached to packaged products. So perhaps price control and eliminating the used software market was also part of the strategy behind this move.

Ready for a nightmare scenario? Far fetched though it may sound, consider what might happen if a patent dispute breaks out, and someone like Adobe gets a court order to partially or fully disable certain features - or possibly an entire product? This could become a whole new opportunity for patent trolls to have a field day with. And one more thing for software customers to worry about.

The more I think about the possibilities this move by Adobe opens up, the less I like what I'm thinking.

« Last Edit: May 09, 2013, 03:10:23 PM by 40hz »