Welcome Guest.   Make a donation to an author on the site April 16, 2014, 02:05:00 PM  *

Please login or register.
Or did you miss your validation email?


Login with username and password (forgot your password?)
Why not become a lifetime supporting member of the site with a one-time donation of any amount? Your donation entitles you to a ton of additional benefits, including access to exclusive discounts and downloads, the ability to enter monthly free software drawings, and a single non-expiring license key for all of our programs.


You must sign up here before you can post and access some areas of the site. Registration is totally free and confidential.
 
The N.A.N.Y. Challenge 2014! Download dozens of custom programs!
   
   Forum Home   Thread Marks Chat! Downloads Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Reply  |  New Topic  |  Print  
Author Topic: Best JAVA IDE  (Read 6322 times)
Josh
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 3,296



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« on: February 10, 2013, 10:14:35 AM »

Alright folks, let the religious war begin!

I am looking to start a good discussion on what is currently considered to be the best available FREEWARE IDE for Java development. I know there are a lot of factors to take into account when selecting an IDE (Debugging ability, feature-set, etc.). To me, the most important aspects of an IDE are autocomplete, express evaluation (hover over to get current value or diving further), and debugging ability.

With that said, I would like some input as to what others consider and even suggestions. I use eclipse...well, because most suggest it as the "de-facto" standard. I am not sure if this is because it is free, or because most Android development takes place in it. Android support is important for me, but it is not a must. I am having fun learning Java right now but I find eclipse to be a bit "clunky" with common place things like auto-complete. JDeveloper is looking nice and I think that the ADF mobile tools might fit in quite nicely once I get through my first Java app.

Anyways, let he discussion begin. What features are important to you? What IDE do you use and why?
Logged

Strength in Knowledge
Renegade
Charter Member
***
Posts: 10,360



Tell me something you don't know...

see users location on a map View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2013, 10:34:41 AM »

BBBBBLLLLLLOOOOOOODDDDD~~~~~!!!!! Grin


I mainly use:

  • Visual Studio
  • MonoDevelop
  • Eclipse

On rare occasions, I strap myself to the rack or step into the iron maiden for the torture of Xcode. It's been a while since, but from what I hear, it's better now than my last water boarding. (But that's not for Java.)

For Eclipse... I hate it. It sucks. It's just a goddamn nightmare to use compared to either VS or MD.

The...


Sigh... I don't like Eclipse much.

I do like MonoDevelop very much though. While it's not VS, it's still really damn good. You get everything that you'd expect with very few frustrations.

But, I don't use MonoDevelop for Java - that's purely Eclipse for me (and rarely VS for quick edits sometimes).

What I'm curious about is Netbeans. A while back they had some issue where if you installed Netbeans, you basically hosed your system entirely with no hope of recovery. (WRT editing Java, etc.) I'd bet that they've solved that by now though.

I've heard amazing things about IntelliJ, but never used it.

(I don't to a lot of primary productive stuff in Java, though I deal with a lot of Java code.)

I'll be very interested to hear what people have to say on this topic. cheesy
Logged

Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker
f0dder
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 8,774



[Well, THAT escalated quickly!]

see users location on a map View Profile WWW Read user's biography. Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2013, 10:54:32 AM »

Eclipse, since it's the de facto standard - and I'm more or less forced to use one of those "vendor value-added" (read: lobotomized) Eclipse versions at work. Can't say I'm a big fan of Eclipse, but that's probably because I'm comparing it to Visual Studio... which isn't really fair smiley. It gets the job done (and oh, it would be sweet if I could a recent version of standard Eclipse instead of the Adobe junk!), and that's about it.

Tried to take a look at NetBeans a couple of times, but didn't really see much point to it; didn't seem to be much of a speed difference between it and Eclipse (at least not with smallish test projects), but since there didn't really appear to be any glaring benefits in NetBeans, I always ended up with the familiarity of Eclipse.

Some of my coworkers praise IntelliJ, but haven't used it myself - and it costs a pretty penny. There's a free Community Edition, though, with a pretty decent feature set.
Logged

- carpe noctem
Ath
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 2,131



see users location on a map View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2013, 11:00:54 AM »

Ah, again this same question  cheesy

IMHO, there is only 1 java IDE and that's Eclipse.

I also use NetBeans, but I always feel I'm treated like idiot by it, so I'm somewhat discomforted when using it. And the projects are a disaster as it's impossible to switch project-type, or have a project that builds using both ant and maven.
And when working with VS2010, I crave for the autocomplete and javadoc features of Eclipse. The only good feature there is the search feature during intellisense but I expect the next release of Eclipse to have that too.
Logged

ewemoa
Honorary Member
**
Posts: 2,228



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2013, 07:22:52 PM »

So no IntelliJ users?

Looking for an excuse to try it smiley
Logged
f0dder
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 8,774



[Well, THAT escalated quickly!]

see users location on a map View Profile WWW Read user's biography. Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2013, 07:26:42 PM »

So no IntelliJ users?

Looking for an excuse to try it smiley
<duck-and-cover>
Well, it's commercial software, so it's bound to be better than both Eclipse and NetBeans - isn't that excuse enough? ;P
</duck-and-cover>
Logged

- carpe noctem
Ath
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 2,131



see users location on a map View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2013, 02:02:00 AM »

So no IntelliJ users?

Looking for an excuse to try it smiley
Tried it a few months ago, but I was so totally baffled on how to use it, even after being 'nurtured' by NetBeans, I un-installed it 5 minutes after first try. embarassed
Logged

ewemoa
Honorary Member
**
Posts: 2,228



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2013, 04:52:28 AM »

Thanks for the comments.



Recently I've been using Eclipse to follow some Android tutorials.  I haven't had that much difficulty with it (except for a strange incident when it stopped recognizing the ADT plugin) but I noticed the author of RoboGuice spoke highly of IntelliJ in a talk so I started looking for comparisons between that and Eclipse.

A brief search seemed to indicate that Eclipse has more (and more up-to-date) plugins and tends to be supported earlier than IntelliJ (if the latter gets support at all).  Core-functionality-wise I got the impression that they aren't all that different from each other with more comments about IntelliJ being less confusing to use than Eclipse (may be it's just a matter of what one is used to...).



On a non-Java note, I'm looking into Scala and noticed that IntelliJ has some kind of support and there's this plugin(?) for Eclipse: http://scala-ide.org/ -- has any one had experience and opinions on the latter?
Logged
f0dder
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 8,774



[Well, THAT escalated quickly!]

see users location on a map View Profile WWW Read user's biography. Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2013, 08:53:24 AM »

A brief search seemed to indicate that Eclipse has more (and more up-to-date) plugins and tends to be supported earlier than IntelliJ (if the latter gets support at all).
How many plugins do you need - what kind of plugin quality do you need? smiley

Core-functionality-wise I got the impression that they aren't all that different from each other with more comments about IntelliJ being less confusing to use than Eclipse (may be it's just a matter of what one is used to...).
What I hear from the coworkers that praise IntelliJ is that it's "more powerful" - stuff like better refactoring support, and tooling for various frameworks (the latter probably mostly important if you work on larger/commercial projects). Also, (at the expense of somewhat slow startup time?) it's supposedly a fair bit faster than Eclipse at doing refactorings, project-wide searches (not just full-text search but semantic searches), et cetera.

On a non-Java note, I'm looking into Scala and noticed that IntelliJ has some kind of support and there's this plugin(?) for Eclipse: http://scala-ide.org/ -- has any one had experience and opinions on the latter?
My general impression is that Scala tooling is still pretty rought around the edges in general. I took the Coursera Functional Programming Principles in Scala course, using Eclipse. It was a major PITA to get the right plugin versions set up - nightly vs. semistable channels, and different versions (for different versions of Scala) added to that mix. Also, I had some weird fluke-outs where Eclipse wouldn't recognize scala files, or would throw very weird errors, or where the Scala Worksheet would mess up and be wonky.

The Scala Worksheet is very cool though, it's like a REPL on steroids. Useful while learning, and beyond that too.

I see that the most recent version of IntelliJ has support for the Play 2 framework. The Eclipse support for Views was basically non-existing, at least as of a couple of months ago.
Logged

- carpe noctem
ewemoa
Honorary Member
**
Posts: 2,228



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2013, 07:38:55 AM »

Thanks for the detailed comments smiley

That course looks interesting -- it looks like it's taught by the creator of Scala.  The Worksheet does sound neat -- thanks for mentioning it.



I ended up installing IntelliJ on a *nix and am slowly trying it out -- so far it doesn't seem too confusing.  What I'm after at the moment is writing tests for Android apps using RoboSpecs (Specs2 + Robolectric).
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 08:49:46 PM by ewemoa » Logged
f0dder
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 8,774



[Well, THAT escalated quickly!]

see users location on a map View Profile WWW Read user's biography. Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2013, 08:54:37 AM »

That course looks interesting -- it looks like it's taught by the creator of Scala.
Yup, Martin Odersky himself doing the videos. Iirc he had some other people make the assignments (or help him come up with ideas), and there's a lot of work behind the automated testing/grading platform.

Was a pretty decent course - but it's way more focused on FP than on Scala, definitely not a "learn scala" course :-)
Logged

- carpe noctem
gmB2k1
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 7

see users location on a map View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2013, 01:20:24 PM »

I'm using Eclipse - it's free.
Because I'm still learning and doing miniscule taks my needs are very basic.
Actually a text editor with syntax highlighting would be sufficient if I could do debugging with it.

But when you go to eclipse.org the leanest bundle they offer for download are Eclipse Classic and Eclipse IDE for Java developers.
So I downloaded and started the program.
The first thing that greeted me was a dialog that said EGit couldn't find the Git installation.
And I was like double-u tee eff.
I don't need a DVCS to follow my tutorials and exercises and I certainly don't want it.
And it comes with a lot of other stuff, of which I'm not even sure what it is.
I checked the installed plugins and there were like a brazillion entries.

So I googled a bit and found this very helpful tip:

Go to the Platform Project's download area. You want the "Platform Runtime Binary" (49.5 MB) and the "JDT Runtime Binary" (24MB).
Extract and run the platform, go to Help -> Install New Software. Click "Add..." -> "Archive" -> choose the JDT zip you downloaded. Uncheck "Group Items by category", then select the "Eclipse Java Development Tools". Click next to install and restart eclipse when prompted.


I did this and now I have a pretty lean installation of eclipse. Just what I wanted.
Maybe this tip is helpful to someone else.


Logged
rdgrimes
Participant
*
Posts: 1

View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2013, 11:33:43 AM »

I have been using Genuitec's MyEclipse IDE (obviously based on Eclipse) for the last 7 years. Yes, it costs --- a whole $63 per year for the Pro edition, but I find it has some productivity features that makes it worth it.
Logged
Ath
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 2,131



see users location on a map View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2013, 11:49:56 AM »

I have been using Genuitec's MyEclipse IDE (obviously based on Eclipse) for the last 7 years. Yes, it costs --- a whole $63 per year for the Pro edition, but I find it has some productivity features that makes it worth it.
We had a professional subscription for several years up until about 3 years ago, but it never gave us much improvement over plain Eclipse, in case of features that we made actual use of. The last 2 years the updates came really slow, and really incompatible with newly updated plugins we used, so we switched to standard Eclipse, and bundled it with the most common plugins for our company-usage, and everybody is happy again (maybe except Genuitec Wink)
And a few teams also use or switched to NetBeans.
Logged

ewemoa
Honorary Member
**
Posts: 2,228



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2013, 05:52:18 PM »

On a related note, was watching the "What's New in Android Developer Tools" Google IO 2013 session, and noticed that it looks like there's a fair bit of energy going into Android support for IntelliJ.  FWIW, there was an intro to IntelliJ functionality starting at around 03:27.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Reply  |  New Topic  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
   Forum Home   Thread Marks Chat! Downloads Search Login Register  

DonationCoder.com | About Us
DonationCoder.com Forum | Powered by SMF
[ Page time: 0.044s | Server load: 0.08 ]