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Author Topic: SuperMoon Pictures - Post Them Here :)  (Read 3499 times)
Stephen66515
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« on: May 05, 2012, 10:23:19 AM »

For those of you who are lucky enough to take some photos of tonights SuperMoon, could I request you to post them here, simply because it gives them a home thats easy to find cheesy

For those unfamiliar with what I am talking about, check out this video:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkl_k4X63-Y" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkl_k4X63-Y</a>
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x16wda
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« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2012, 01:35:19 PM »

Oh- phew!  I thought this was another thread about Google Street View...

Hiberno-mooner stalks Google Street View
Ireland gives Google traditional pogue mahone greeting

 Wink
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Deozaan
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« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2012, 06:09:55 PM »

I think it's silly that they talk about the effect that SuperMoons have on the tide. From that video, I understand a SuperMoon to be a full moon when the moon is at the perigee of its orbit. That only happens about once a year.

However, the moon is at the perigee of its orbit about once a month*. This would affect the tide in the same way, whether it appears to be a "full moon" (SuperMoon) or not.



*The word "month" is based on "moon," because the moon orbits the Earth approximately once per month.
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SeraphimLabs
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« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2012, 07:53:51 PM »

The difference is the supermoons are abnormally close due to orbital variation, or are exactly opposite the earth from the sun- producing a combined tidal force.

It's rising bright and clear where I live, but I lack any usable cameras to photograph it with.
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Renegade
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« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2012, 12:08:33 AM »

I tried to take pictures of the last one, but failed miserably. Need to learn a bit more about how to take pictures properly...
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tomos
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« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2012, 03:32:01 AM »

I didnt notice it being bigger or anything - I think that often has more to do with the atmosphere.

Here's one. 10x zoom, pocket camera.
Settings (manual): F13; 1/125sec; ISO 80  (exif data is included)
You need to rest the camera on something or use a tripod.

All I did after taking the picture is crop - it's a bit dark really...



here's it a bit brighter



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Tom
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« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2012, 05:22:55 AM »


However, the moon is at the perigee of its orbit about once a month*. This would affect the tide in the same way, whether it appears to be a "full moon" (SuperMoon) or not.


Not quite correct deozaan : "The scientific term for the phenomenon is "perigee moon." Full Moons vary in size because of the oval shape of the Moon's orbit. The Moon follows an elliptical path around Earth with one side ("perigee") about 50,000 km closer than the other ("apogee").  Full Moons that occur on the perigee side of the Moon's orbit seem extra big and bright."

So it happens about once a year.
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hamradio
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« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2012, 11:11:48 PM »

Heres one of mine at 18x zoom cropped out...




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Carroll - HamRadioUSA
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« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2012, 04:58:22 AM »

From our backyard.  I actually sprung my wife from the nursing home for this 'Supermoon'.

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J-Mac
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« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2012, 02:47:04 PM »

Well, I was all set but cloud cover made the Supermoon just barely a glow in the eastern sky here.   Sad

Jim
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Deozaan
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« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2012, 09:39:30 PM »

However, the moon is at the perigee of its orbit about once a month*. This would affect the tide in the same way, whether it appears to be a "full moon" (SuperMoon) or not.
Not quite correct deozaan : "The scientific term for the phenomenon is "perigee moon." Full Moons vary in size because of the oval shape of the Moon's orbit. The Moon follows an elliptical path around Earth with one side ("perigee") about 50,000 km closer than the other ("apogee").  Full Moons that occur on the perigee side of the Moon's orbit seem extra big and bright."

So it happens about once a year.

Huh? huh I know that a Super Moon happens about once a year. What I was saying is that the moon is at its perigee about once a month. My point was that the tidal forces created by the moon's gravity at its perigee shouldn't be any different whether the moon appeared to be "full" or not.

However, I failed to take into consideration whether or not the sun affects tides. I'd never heard of such a thing but it appears that SeraphimLabs is suggesting that it does.
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Carol Haynes
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« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2012, 05:44:54 AM »

Spring and Neap tides are caused by the gravitational reinforcement of the Moon and the Sun.

When the Sun, Earth and Moon line up you get the maximum tidal effect. (Spring Tides)

When the Moon is at right angles to the line between the Earth and the Sun you get minimal tides (Neap Tides).

See http://en.wikipedia.org/w...iation:_springs_and_neaps

Perigee should have a little influence on increased tides because the moon is a bit closer to the Earth at perigee. It doesn't matter whether the moon is full or not (full moon has nothing to do with perigee which simply means the closest point in the orbit of one body to another). The super moon phenomenon is just a factor of the relative positions of the Sun, Moon and Earth at the Moon's perigee.

If you wonder if the Sun has any effect on tides look at some of the moons of Jupiter - the tidal forces of the attraction of Jupiter and the Sun (and other moons) cause some of the moons to physically deform and contract to such an extent that they cause the moon to heat up. See, for example, Io (http://www.planetaryexplo...ter/io/tidal_heating.html) where tidal interactions of the Sun, other moons and Jupiter combine to keep Io hot enough to be volcanic. Without those tidal forces Io would be a dead lump of rock.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 05:49:58 AM by Carol Haynes » Logged

Deozaan
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« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2012, 06:53:30 AM »

To get back to the topic, here's a gallery of SuperMoon photos/videos:

http://www.theblaze.com/s...-pics-from-blaze-readers/
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Nuckelsboy
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« Reply #13 on: May 10, 2012, 07:20:30 AM »

not made by me obviously but i love this one :
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phitsc
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« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2012, 10:45:58 AM »

I took this one!  Thmbsup

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