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Author Topic: CISPA is the New SOPA/PIPA/OPEN/ACTA/etc. etc. etc.  (Read 9558 times)
Renegade
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« Reply #25 on: April 18, 2012, 07:28:47 AM »

Looks like Brin may have felt he was misquoted or quoted out of context, or something. See the clarification on his G+ here.

Quote
But regardless of how you feel about digital ecosystems or about Google, please do not take the free and open internet for granted from government intervention. To the extent that free flow of information threatens the powerful, those in power will seek to suppress it.

+1 for Sergey Brin there! Totally on board there. Just not sure if he's on the level there... But that doesn't mean he's not right. cheesy
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IainB
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« Reply #26 on: April 18, 2012, 08:39:19 AM »

I started a thread with a link where people can sign a petition against CISPA here. Wink Hint hint. Wink
Thanks! Signed.
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IainB
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« Reply #27 on: April 18, 2012, 08:41:36 AM »

+1 for Sergey Brin there! Totally on board there....
+1 Yes, me too. I thought it was very heartening to read that.
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Renegade
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« Reply #28 on: April 18, 2012, 09:38:33 AM »

I started a thread with a link where people can sign a petition against CISPA here. Wink Hint hint. Wink
Thanks! Signed.

Awesome~! cheesy

(Hint hint... everyone else, you'll be awesome too if you support not being spied on and not being censored. Wink That was so totally shameless... I should be ashamed... tongue But I'm not~! cheesy )
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TaoPhoenix
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« Reply #29 on: April 26, 2012, 06:02:26 PM »

More CISPA news.

http://hothardware.com/Ne...heck-of-Privacy-Invasion/

"One of the bill's key passages is a provision that gives private companies the right to share cybersecurity data with each other and with the government "notwithstanding any other provision of law."

Edit: US House passes CISPA.
http://www.wired.com/thre...12/04/house-passes-cispa/

The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, or CISPA, sponsored by Reps. Mike Rogers (R-Michigan) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Maryland), passed on a vote of 248 to 168.

Lovely. That means it's "Bi-Partisan", so there's no escape in the upcoming election.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2012, 07:41:05 PM by TaoPhoenix » Logged
Renegade
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« Reply #30 on: April 27, 2012, 12:32:44 AM »

Interesting how they sneak in a few last minute changes, then quickly pass it...

The Tech Dirt take on it:

http://www.techdirt.com/a...-passed-rushed-vote.shtml

Quote
Basically this means CISPA can no longer be called a cybersecurity bill at all. The government would be able to search information it collects under CISPA for the purposes of investigating American citizens with complete immunity from all privacy protections as long as they can claim someone committed a "cybersecurity crime". Basically it says the 4th Amendment does not apply online, at all. Moreover, the government could do whatever it wants with the data as long as it can claim that someone was in danger of bodily harm, or that children were somehow threatened—again, notwithstanding absolutely any other law that would normally limit the government's power.

Somehow, incredibly, this was described as limiting CISPA, but it accomplishes the exact opposite. This is very, very bad.

The Police States of America is in high gear... Sad
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Stoic Joker
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« Reply #31 on: April 27, 2012, 06:58:04 AM »

The Police States of America is in high gear... Sad

...Welcome to the Darth Vader School of Child Care (your will subjected to force).
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Renegade
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« Reply #32 on: April 28, 2012, 02:34:33 AM »

The Police States of America is in high gear... Sad

...Welcome to the Darth Vader School of Child Care (your will subjected to force).

Would that make Richard Stallman kind of like Chewbacca? tongue Grin

http://rt.com/news/stallm...a-human-rights-abuse-174/

Quote
Controversial online security bill CISPA is two steps away from becoming a law. Software freedom activist Richard Stallman says Internet users should beware, as the government is a much bigger threat than any individual hacker.

“What CISPA says as passed by the House of Representatives is any ISP, any website, any company that has some of your data in it can voluntarily hand it over to the government for a wide range of reasons,” and it's up to the government to interpret it however they see fit, the father of the free software philosophy explained.

“So if they see the slightest bit that they think is odd in your email, they can hand it over to the government. And if the government says it has something to do with national security – it is very easy to say that, whether it’s true or not – then the government can study it for any purpose. This nearly abolishes people’s right not to be unreasonably searched.”

And the hilarious part that will have you pissing your pants laughing~! Grin

Quote

When asked if Obama will go through with his promise to veto the bill, Stallman said that it's “unusual for Obama to stand for human rights,” but that he would be glad if the president does in fact veto the bill.


Bwahahahaha~!

But hey, if the shoe fits!
« Last Edit: April 28, 2012, 02:43:09 AM by Renegade » Logged

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IainB
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« Reply #33 on: April 28, 2012, 04:36:50 AM »

The Police States of America is in high gear... Sad
It looks like an easy checkmate to me - "All your base are belong to us."
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Renegade
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« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2012, 05:48:59 AM »

The Police States of America is in high gear... Sad
It looks like an easy checkmate to me - "All your base are belong to us."

Hhahaha~! smiley

Actually, the part where the PSA says, "All your base are belong to us" is more like "all your everything are belong to us":

http://www.infowars.com/n...or-military-preparedness/
http://www.whitehouse.gov...se-resources-preparedness
http://rt.com/usa/news/ob...utive-order-national-929/

But it's a different piece of legislation.

The long and short of it is truly is, "all your everything are belong to us."

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxwkaAxg6MM" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxwkaAxg6MM</a>
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TaoPhoenix
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« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2012, 08:12:01 AM »


Then again, even without CISPA and friends (sounds like a kiddy show!) our favorite .gov folks have this:

"The FBI Workaround For Private Companies To Share Information With Law Enforcement Without CISPA"
"What has been left out of the debate thus far, though, is the model that CISPA appears in many ways to be based upon. The FBI has been information-sharing with private industry for over a decade without a bill like CISPA in place.

In 1997, long-time FBI agent Dan Larkin helped set up a non-profit based in Pittsburgh that “functions as a conduit between private industry and law enforcement.” Its industry members, which include banks, ISPs, telcos, credit card companies, pharmaceutical companies, and others can hand over cyberthreat information to the non-profit, called the National Cyber Forensics and Training Alliance (NCFTA), which has a legal agreement with the government that allows it to then hand over info to the FBI. Conveniently, the FBI has a unit, the Cyber Initiative and Resource Fusion Unit, stationed in the NCFTA’s office. Companies can share information with the 501(c)6 non-profit that they would be wary of (or prohibited from) sharing directly with the FBI."

http://www.ncfta.net/become-ncft-partner
National Cyber-Forensics & Training Alliance
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Josh
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« Reply #36 on: April 28, 2012, 08:30:47 AM »

Microsoft backs away from CISPA
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Strength in Knowledge
TaoPhoenix
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« Reply #37 on: April 28, 2012, 08:44:48 AM »

Microsoft seems to have tried to sorta stay out of the tracking headlights. I'm not sure what to make of them on these topics.
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IainB
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« Reply #38 on: April 28, 2012, 09:09:11 AM »

Microsoft seems to have tried to sorta stay out of the tracking headlights. I'm not sure what to make of them on these topics.
Well, they probably would back away - wouldn't they? They probably just want to get on with the business of making a mountain of money, by continuing to be the market's de facto monopoly, producing some pretty good software, and without risking unnecessary alienation of their market.
Heck, some people might say - not me you understand - that for all we know, M$ may have even written the initial CISPA draft, but I couldn't possibly comment.
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TaoPhoenix
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« Reply #39 on: April 28, 2012, 09:49:27 AM »

Microsoft seems to have tried to sorta stay out of the tracking headlights. I'm not sure what to make of them on these topics.
Well, they probably would back away - wouldn't they? They probably just want to get on with the business of making a mountain of money, by continuing to be the market's de facto monopoly, producing some pretty good software, and without risking unnecessary alienation of their market.

Ooh, you have an interesting theme: Free versions abuse your privacy, and then Microsoft/someone markets "privacy protecting" paid versions. I know all about MS's anti-competitiveness tricks and lock-in, but if they stuck with a classical stance on protecting user privacy we could be watching a nice clash of concepts.
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IainB
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« Reply #40 on: April 28, 2012, 11:43:42 AM »

Good dose of healthy cynicism there, @TaoPhoenix...     Thmbsup
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TaoPhoenix
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« Reply #41 on: April 28, 2012, 11:55:57 AM »

I can just see it like a Best Buy upsell plan too!
"Would you like to pay us not to sell your data?"

Edit: It's on a sliding scale! "How many days at a dime-a-day would you like to buy before we sell your data anyway?"

Damn, cynicism used to be social commentary. Now it's actual prophecy.
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Renegade
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« Reply #42 on: April 30, 2012, 07:54:12 AM »

Just saw this:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdGirq4b0Z4" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdGirq4b0Z4</a>

Rather humorous.
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Renegade
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« Reply #43 on: September 25, 2013, 10:32:22 PM »

NECROTHREAD... ARISE!

By the dark powers of all that is unholy,
By the ball-hair of Lucifer and his retarded cousin Molly,

In the name of the blackest blood flowing through cursed veins,
In the name of our darkest princess, Dianne Feinstein...




Yep. You knew it. The psychos would be back with CISPA at some point.

http://www.techdirt.com/a...ime-to-revive-cispa.shtml

Quote
Tone Deaf Dianne Feinstein Thinks Now Is A Good Time To Revive CISPA

from the what-is-she-smoking? dept

We had believed, along with a number of others, that the Snowden leaks showing how the NSA was spying on pretty much everyone would likely kill CISPA dead. After all, the key component to CISPA was basically a method for encouraging companies to have total immunity from sharing information with the NSA. And while CISPA supporters pretended this was to help protect those companies and others from online attacks, the Snowden leaks have reinforced the idea (that many of us had been pointing out from the beginning) that it was really about making it easier for the NSA to rope in companies to help them spy on people.

More at the link.
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IainB
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« Reply #44 on: September 26, 2013, 12:13:24 AM »

Well, maybe it is merely a politically pragmatic and stealth approach to securing the legal sanction of NSA spying legitimisation whilst avoiding the risk of any more blowback from the Snowden/NSA revelations.
I mean, it could make sense to use CISPA (or some SOPA**/CISPA** permutation/derivative) to legislate implicit sanction for indirect NSA access, and as a lever to gain agreement from senators who might otherwise be reluctant to publicly approve any new, direct access NSA spying legislation.
Those senators might need to save face that way.
From what I have read it's all pretty much a foregone conclusion. It's gone too far, and there's too much at stake, commercially and politically, for government to allow retraction on this matter.
From the evidence - i.e., what we have seen so far - you are arguably up against the usual remorseless totalitarianism/fascism, and if you don't like it then you will have to lump it. Chances of change and survival AS-IS are probably equivalent to the proverbial chances of an ice cube in Hell.
You will get that legislation passed, one way or another, regardless. So, "forgetaboutit" - quote from Donnie Brasco, which context was also American gangsterism.
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