Home | Blog | Software | Reviews and Features | Forum | Help | Donate | About us
topbanner_forum
  *

avatar image

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
  • September 05, 2015, 05:20:29 AM
  • Proudly celebrating 10 years online.
  • Donate now to become a lifetime supporting member of the site and get a non-expiring license key for all of our programs.
  • donate

Author Topic: When good tech ideas go bad  (Read 1150 times)

zridling

  • Friend of the Site
  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 3,292
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
When good tech ideas go bad
« on: September 20, 2011, 08:56:29 AM »
solyndrafactory16.jpg
http://gigaom.com/cl...tech-ideas-gone-bad/

Katie Fehrenbacher has an excellent article on GigaOM today, When good tech ideas go bad:

Sometimes tech trends end up disrupting huge industries, like when the idea of Skype and free web calls, collided with the phone companies. However, sometimes tech ideas have all the makings of these kind of disruptions — complete with collective billions of dollars of venture capital funding, dozens of startup competitors, and enthusiastic analyst predictions — but ultimately end up flaming out because of things like timing, macroeconomic conditions, or fatal business model flaws.

40hz

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2007
  • **
  • Posts: 11,530
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: When good tech ideas go bad
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2011, 09:11:59 AM »
Thanks Z! Good article. More please?

----

Read the business history of Commodore Computer for one textbook example after another of shooting yourself in the foot.

This is a company that "had it all" in their hands at least three separate times. And each time rampant egos and corporate hubris, combined with garden variety stupidity (and market change) sank them.

If Commodore played it's cards right, Apple would have been just another footnote in the history of personal computing. And an emaciated and crazed-looking Steve Jobs (affectionately known as The Madman of Cupertino) would likely still be seen wandering the streets of Silicon Valley looking for somebody else's "genius invention" to hitch a ride on and promulgate as his own...

So RIP Commodore. Vaya con Dios...

On second thought, considering how badly they handled nearly everything, it probably served 'em right. :-\
« Last Edit: September 20, 2011, 09:24:47 AM by 40hz »

zridling

  • Friend of the Site
  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 3,292
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: When good tech ideas go bad
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2011, 12:17:25 PM »
The YouTube videos of Amiga were my introduction to Commodore a few years ago. Had a couple of buddies who were still using and programming their Amiga systems through 1995!
http://www.youtube.c...&feature=related

app103

  • That scary taskbar girl
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2006
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,563
    • View Profile
    • App's Apps
    • Donate to Member
Re: When good tech ideas go bad
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2011, 09:48:45 AM »
If you really want a treat, archive.org has an old episode of Computer Chronicles, showcasing the Amiga 500 & 2000.

http://www.archive.org/details/amiga_2

While watching this, consider the capabilities and cost of what else was available at the time...a PC with MS-DOS 4 or Windows 386/2.1 ($5,000) or a Mac with OS2 ($4,869). The Amiga was under $1000. It was so much more affordable than just about anything else in current use, that the entertainment industry embraced it and used it for things like the early episodes of Babylon 5. The entire first season's special effects (and about half of the 2nd) were done exclusively on a network of Amigas.

40hz

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2007
  • **
  • Posts: 11,530
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: When good tech ideas go bad
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2011, 11:21:58 AM »
Truly great landmarks in personal desktop computing:

  • 1983 - IBM PC + Lotus 1-2-3
  • 1986 - Apple Macintosh & LaserWriter + Aldus Pagemaker
  • 1990 - Commodore Amiga + Video Toaster/Lightwave 3D
                         Atari ST + Cubase 2.0  (1990 was a very good year!)


 8)
« Last Edit: September 21, 2011, 11:37:13 AM by 40hz »