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Last post Author Topic: Choosing a new PC package for a relative.. Post your recommendations  (Read 16130 times)

mouser

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Re: Choosing a new PC package for a relative.. Post your recommendations
« Reply #25 on: November 23, 2009, 08:59:31 AM »
I'm also thinking that a great thing to do for a relative when you set them up with a new pc, is install a virtual machine software for them (virtualbox, etc.) and install a copy of their OS in it (and maybe even linux if they want to experiment), and then instruct them on how to install new software programs on the virtual machine, and tell them that they should NEVER install anything onto their main pc that they aren't 100% sure they will want to keep using permanently.  Everything else they should install on the virtual machine.

JavaJones

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Re: Choosing a new PC package for a relative.. Post your recommendations
« Reply #26 on: November 23, 2009, 12:02:27 PM »
I'm also thinking that a great thing to do for a relative when you set them up with a new pc, is install a virtual machine software for them (virtualbox, etc.) and install a copy of their OS in it (and maybe even linux if they want to experiment), and then instruct them on how to install new software programs on the virtual machine, and tell them that they should NEVER install anything onto their main pc that they aren't 100% sure they will want to keep using permanently.  Everything else they should install on the virtual machine.

Interesting idea. Have you actually implemented this practically? I'd be curious to know whether people would actually take to the idea and keep it up.

- Oshyan

mouser

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Re: Choosing a new PC package for a relative.. Post your recommendations
« Reply #27 on: November 23, 2009, 12:13:48 PM »
yeah that's the question, whether they couldand would actually use it.. no i haven't yet but i may.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2009, 12:16:47 PM by mouser »

Cloq

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Re: Choosing a new PC package for a relative.. Post your recommendations
« Reply #28 on: November 23, 2009, 01:06:08 PM »
The Vostro line isn't too bad. Just make sure to get a 3+ year on-site warranty (adds another $120 I think).

Get the extended warranty and a battery backup system. My workplace is primarily a dell shop (over 7000+ dells) and let's just say we are thankful for the extra long warranty our dells come with (negotiated 5 year warranty for the price of 3).

I have a WIP theory that Dell engineers their products to require warranty servicing.. kinda like when your car reaches 3000 or 5000 miles,  the check engine/maintence light comes on

MilesAhead

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Re: Choosing a new PC package for a relative.. Post your recommendations
« Reply #29 on: November 23, 2009, 03:07:12 PM »
like when your car reaches 3000 or 5000 miles,  the check engine/maintence light comes on

Mine came on aamof.  I opened the hood.  Yup!! Engine was still there!



OldElmerFudd

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Re: Choosing a new PC package for a relative.. Post your recommendations
« Reply #30 on: December 09, 2009, 09:11:15 PM »
I'm afraid I'm like your Dad, Mouser. The four machines around me are all home-grown, and I'm putting the finishing touches on a Win 7 box based on a Gigabyte EP45-UDP3 MB, and 4gigs of PC2 8500 RAM. The only times recently I've bought anything pre-assembled was a Lenovo refurbed XPPro desktop and an ASUS 1008HA Seashell Netbook, both for a friend who's an absolute Luddite when it comes to hardware. I did strip all of the pre-installed crap out of those machines and customized the boxes for her use.
 :Thmbsup:
Always code as if the guy who ends up maintaining your code is a violent psychopath and knows where you live.

howardb

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Re: Choosing a new PC package for a relative: The XP transfer Problem
« Reply #31 on: December 11, 2009, 03:47:04 PM »
Although I have geeky tendencies, the hardware gains still far outpace my software needs. Others keep giving me PCs a few years old which have been: an IBM, an emachines, and a Compaq (HP version) with an Athlon 200+ processor. You would think the emachines would grind to a hault soon, but it still runs find and quiet after years of operation (cheap parts must have been good that year!). The IBM was a solid workhorse, and the Conpaq a disappointment compared to the reviews.

All and all, a real home try reveals many things a store demo does not. Most of the chain stores provide a few weeks return policy, if minimal good support afterwords.

My huge gripe with widows machines is the infamous activation, and registry. Would it be nice after years of customizing, to just plot your old hard drive into the new machine and have it pretty much work (or alternately clone the old software?
But no - you need new drivers, you can not easily merge the new and old registry without creating a mess, and you must deal with the drive-you-insane activation process, even if you have 2 valid versions of (say) windows xp, and you must remove the new crapware.

Ah - if someone would write something like winLite, for a smooth software transition from old to new machine, or - if Microsoft would sell compromise licenses -say one copy of windows good for 2 or 3 machines.