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Author Topic: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart  (Read 4082 times)

40hz

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$100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« on: February 24, 2009, 09:36:01 PM »
It was bound to happen sooner or later. Marvell Semiconductor will soon be releasing a complete Linux based computer with decent specs for only $100. This little critter is tiny, and could easily be mistaken for your usual AC "wall-wart" adapter.

marvell_sheevaplug1.jpg

Write-ups can be found all over the blogosphere, but one of the best is up on LinuxDevices.com

http://www.linuxdevi...34061300.html?kc=rss

Quote
Marvell Semiconductor is shipping a hardware/software development kit suitable for always-on home automation devices and service gateways. Resembling a "wall-wart" power adapter, the SheevaPlug draws 5 Watts, comes with Linux, and boasts completely open hardware and software designs, Marvell says.

In typical use, the SheevaPlug draws about as much power as a night-light. Yet, with 512MB each of RAM and Flash, and a 1.2GHz CPU, the unobtrusive device approaches the computing power found in the servers of only a decade ago.

Furthermore, the platform is available in single quantities, and is priced within reach of students, hobbyists, and tinkerers. Its hardware design is completely open -- everything from schematics to Gerber files will be available on a website, Marvell said. For those that do wish to build products on the platform, volume pricing could fall to $50, Marvell expects.

And also at Heise's h-online.com

http://www.h-online....puters--/news/112713

Quote
Marvell's Kirkwood processor looks to be one of Atom's competitors. Its ARM v5TE compatible Sheeva core operates at speeds of 800 MHz to 1.2 GHz and offers both a Memory Management Unit (MMU) and relatively large caches (L1: 16 KBytes each for data and instructions, L2: 256 KBytes/300 MHz). The memory controller can handle DDR2 SDRAM with a speed of up to 400 MHz via 16 data lines. Interfaces and controllers are particularly abundant. Depending on the version of Kirkwood, there are two integrated Gigabit Ethernet MACs (Media Access Controllers), one or two SATA II ports, a USB 2.0 host controller and an SDIO controller for memory cards, as well as a PCI Express x1 cards used for connecting components like a WLAN adapter. The SATA ports can reportedly handle more than two hard disks via port multipliers – which can also be obtained from Marvell.

Full functional specifications can be found on Marvell's website:

http://www.globalsca...evaplug-dev-kit.aspx

One example of how it can be used is as a web-enabled (NAS) network attached storage device.

A company called Pogoplug ( http://www.pogoplug.com ) is doing just that for $79:

Quote
The Pogoplug is a small device that plugs into your wall, and connects to your home router and to any external hard drive. After a very simple setup, you can share and access media and files from anywhere in or out of the home. All you need is an Internet connection!

The Pogoplug is the perfect accessory to your connected life. Imagine accessing all your files and media from any laptop or desktop computer, anywhere in the world. There's even an iPhone application so you can always "phone home" to get your files!

A similiar device called the CloudPlug will soon be available from Ctera

http://www.ctera.com...ctera-cloudplug.html

Quote
No More Servers

The CloudPlug delivers Network Attached Storage (NAS) services, without requiring a separate file server. It reduces hardware and maintenance costs with low energy consumption and a low carbon footprint.

No More Tapes

Backup tapes are a thing of the past. Slow, unreliable, and expensive, they require constant manual care, and unless taken off-site regularly, they are not a viable solution for disaster recovery. There is a better alternative.

The CloudPlug automatically backs up your files, using the CTERA online backup service. Your backup is encrypted using high-grade AES encryption and encoded to maximize bandwidth utilization.

No More Data Loss

Many backup solutions work well for backup, but not so well when it comes to recovery. The purpose of backup is to enable recovery of your data when you need it, yet many backup solutions make recovery unreliable and difficult.

The CloudPlug was designed to make recovery of lost data a breeze. By giving you instant access to previous versions of your files, the CloudPlug enables you to roll back any file – or entire folders – to the way they were just before disaster struck.

No More Frustration

You painstakingly copied the files from your home computer onto a USB thumb drive, only to realize when arriving at the office that you forgot to take the USB thumb drive with you. With CTERA's technology, users can access their files from anywhere. Moreover, CTERA's appliances also serve as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) gateways, so access is secure and tightly controlled, with no need for a additional VPN layers

Key Features

    * Turns any USB drive to a Network Attached Storage device for file sharing
    * Performs  automatic and secure online backup to the cloud
    * Easily restores data snapshots
    * Provides secure access to files from anywhere
    * No desktop software to install
    * USB 2.0, Gigabit Ethernet
    * Tiny form-factor, low-power consumption
    * Ideal for 1-5 users



Other companies are planning media servers and additional products based on this device.

Makes me wonder if this little gadget could turn out to be the real "Killer" app that Linux has been looking for.

 8)
« Last Edit: February 24, 2009, 09:46:10 PM by 40hz »

Deozaan

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Re: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2009, 01:19:45 AM »
Wow, that's neat!


f0dder

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Re: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2009, 01:50:05 AM »
Cute, but it looks kinda clunky :)
- carpe noctem

Deozaan

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Re: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2009, 02:14:45 AM »
Cute, but it looks kinda clunky :)

Then it fits the whole "Linux" thing perfectly! [/flamebait] :P


zridling

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Re: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2009, 05:46:03 AM »
Who needs OLPC?! Now slap an i7 chip in that sucker. Cool find.

f0dder

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Re: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2009, 05:52:46 AM »
Who needs OLPC?! Now slap an i7 chip in that sucker. Cool find.
Then you wouldn't get that form factor... nor price.
- carpe noctem

40hz

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Re: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2009, 09:24:49 AM »
Who needs OLPC?! Now slap an i7 chip in that sucker. Cool find.

Put an i7 in it and it wouldn't be cool at all. In fact, it would probably melt. ;D

Cute, but it looks kinda clunky :)

Then it fits the whole "Linux" thing perfectly! [/flamebait] :P


What's wrong with clunky?

When it comes to Linux, some people walk the walk - others waddle the waddle. ;)

opus_walk.gif

« Last Edit: February 25, 2009, 09:50:21 AM by 40hz »

f0dder

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Re: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2009, 09:29:33 AM »
Who needs OLPC?! Now slap an i7 chip in that sucker. Cool find.
Put an i7 in it and it wouldn't be cool at all. In fact, it would probably melt. ;D
Good one :D
- carpe noctem

Edvard

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Re: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2009, 11:22:35 AM »
What's wrong with clunky?

When it comes to Linux, some people walk the walk - others waddle the waddle. ;)

And still others have frickin' lasers strapped to their backs!
laserpenguin.png

 ;D
« Last Edit: February 26, 2009, 12:07:08 PM by Edvard »

40hz

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Re: $100 Linux computer that looks like a wall wart
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2009, 12:17:48 PM »

And still others have frickin' lasers strapped to their backs! (see attachment in previous post)
 ;D


Wooo! Kinky!!! ;D