Welcome Guest.   Make a donation to an author on the site October 30, 2014, 07:20:19 AM  *

Please login or register.
Or did you miss your validation email?


Login with username and password (forgot your password?)
Why not become a lifetime supporting member of the site with a one-time donation of any amount? Your donation entitles you to a ton of additional benefits, including access to exclusive discounts and downloads, the ability to enter monthly free software drawings, and a single non-expiring license key for all of our programs.


You must sign up here before you can post and access some areas of the site. Registration is totally free and confidential.
 
The N.A.N.Y. Challenge 2013! Download dozens of custom programs!
   
  Forum Home Thread Marks Chat! Downloads Search Login Register  
  Show Posts
      View this member's profile 
      donate to someone Donate to this member 
Pages: Prev 1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 [13] 14 15 16 17 18 ... 427 Next
301  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: silly humor - post 'em here! [warning some NSFW and adult content] on: August 03, 2014, 08:24:40 AM
^Brilliant! Grin
302  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Bleep… Bittorrent unveils serverless & encrypted chat client on: August 03, 2014, 07:59:13 AM
Dunno...Tor was supposed to be untraceable. Torrents were supposed to be anonymous. Certain crypto algorithms were supposed to be uncrackable. SSL was actually supposed to be secure. Random numbers were supposed to be random....

I think I'll give it a year or so to see if some security researcher doesn't figure out a way to compromise it.

And even if somebody doesn't find a way to crack it, there's always that little issue with the hardware we all use...

I suspect that if something like Bleep really does prove to be more than a nuisance to those it's pointed at, it will only be a matter of time before chip manufacturers are required to secretly incorporate mechanisms into their firmware and silicon to deal with it - assuming they're not in there already. And since fabricating a modern CPU is beyond the capabilities of even the best funded Kickstarter or Indigogo campaign, that should give the surveillance gnomes another fifteen or twenty years worth of unchallenged omniscience to wallow in...

Here's the real problem as I see it: we are running programs on machines engineered and built by the largest "in bed with the government" corporations in the world; 90% of which are running an operating system known to be compromised; on a network controlled by the governments of the world; over wired connections and radio waves monitored by the governments of the world (and their corporate allies).

Not to discourage people for trying (because it's important that they do) but seriously - who is kidding who?

It's not the governments and the corporations that are playing Whack-a-Mole when it comes to stuff like this.

We are.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note:

Again: This is not a technical problem. It is a people problem. People problems can't be fixed by simply applying some technology.

We need to stop trying to take the easy way out by hoping for a cheap technical fix. We need to sit down, address, and ultimately deal with the real problem here. That's the only way this is ever going to be resolved.

IMHO, things like Bleep mainly serve as a distraction to keep us from dealing with the real problem.

Y'know...if I were in power, I'd probably covertly be encouraging efforts like Bleep and Tor. And the more, the better. It defuses some of the geek outrage - and ties up some very smart and dedicated people (and money) who might otherwise be causing all kinds of problems for me. So let all these brainy types (most of whom will do anything to avoid dealing with an actual person) code to their heart's content. Because in this scenario, the only thing better than my opposition not having a good solution, is having them put their trust in a broken one...
 
303  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage. on: August 03, 2014, 07:27:30 AM
So, which strand of the spider's web is "Lawfare"? Are we being given an accurate prediction? Is this misdirection? Or perhaps just a regular contributor speculating off-the-cuff?

@Ren - You do have a predilection for dividing by zero do'n’t you? as Lewis Carrol might put it. huh

[attach]

Once you go down that rabbit hole of self-referential accusations and 'proofs' you might as well ask which strand of "the spider's web" 40hz represents for merely posting such a link? (Since there's every chance he didn't "merely" post it.)  tongue

FWIW, regardless of which side of the political spectrum somebody comes down on, most people don't talk about things without some sort of agenda (i.e. to get you to agree with them, believe them, do something, don't do something, like the person who's speaking, etc.). Wink
304  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Does anybody seriously think an e-book is still the better option most times? on: August 02, 2014, 05:31:58 PM
Not by coincidence, he had also spent about 3 years moving all his investment money away from the US (he's from New Zealand and currently lives in Denmark) because he saw the collapse coming.

JOOC - which collapse are you referring to? huh

Real Estate and Banking, I'd assume... though it was more of a bubble bursting than a wholesale collapse.

My thought too, although I wasn't sure. A genuine market collapse is such a major event that it's impossible to not feel it. Even when you're as semi-conscious as I usually am. In any financial market periodic corrections, as they're called, are not an automatic cause for panic. Unless you yourself were playing the odds and banking on the bubble.
 Cool
305  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage. on: August 02, 2014, 04:09:38 PM
Interesting article posted on Lawfare regarding Snowden and some reasoned speculation on how the Russian game strategy appears to be changing...

[attach]

Quote
Is Putin Selling Out Edward Snowden?

By Benjamin Wittes
Thursday, July 31, 2014 at 5:24 PM


This is rank, arguably irresponsible, speculation. I have had no—that is to say zero—conversations with anyone who knows anything about Snowden’s status in Russia. I can thus offer no particularly good reason to believe that Vladimir Putin is getting ready to rid himself of Edward Snowden.

But would you take four bad reasons? When you put them all together, I think there’s enough there to make you wonder what’s going on behind the scenes.
...

Are we heading for the endgame?

Read the full article here.

306  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Does anybody seriously think an e-book is still the better option most times? on: August 02, 2014, 03:52:39 PM
Not by coincidence, he had also spent about 3 years moving all his investment money away from the US (he's from New Zealand and currently lives in Denmark) because he saw the collapse coming.

JOOC - which collapse are you referring to? huh
307  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Does anybody seriously think an e-book is still the better option most times? on: August 01, 2014, 08:31:13 PM
^ True, but not a legitimate reason for me to compromise my morals - no matter how satisfying that might feel.

The only problem with that is that there's a legion of abusers of trust and decency who are counting on the rest of us "to not be like that" or "be better than that." Truth is, their continued existence absolutely depends on it.  undecided

But whatever works best for each of us. Morals are a very personal thing. At the end of the day you still have to be able to look at yourself in the mirror. And there's no putting a price tag on a good night's sleep.

(FWIW I myself sleep like a baby! Wink Grin )
308  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Does anybody seriously think an e-book is still the better option most times? on: August 01, 2014, 05:17:16 PM
I'm not saying it's reasonable, but that doesn't mean it wouldn't be fair.

Since when does being reasonable enter into the formula when you're dealing with two-faced slimeball companies? Especially the ones that sre supposedly in business "For OUR children!!!" <*evil grin*>
309  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: "Russia enacts 'draconian' law for bloggers" on: August 01, 2014, 03:05:06 PM
Communist Party or no Communist Party - Russia is Russia. It's "business as usual."

And that "business" never changes. No matter which 'legal' framework it operates under. undecided

[attach]

(Being of Russian descent, I can say that. tongue)
310  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Does anybody seriously think an e-book is still the better option most times? on: August 01, 2014, 02:56:22 PM
[attach]


Read all about it over at Techdirt. Article here.

Quote
DRM Performs Another Miracle, Turns Purchased Childrens Books Into Nothing At All
from the the-magic-of-technology,-in-Biblical-terms dept


An anonymous Techdirt reader sends in the now-unsurprising news that another publisher and its DRM are declaring customers' purchased e-goods null and void. This time it's Scholastic, publisher of many youth and teen titles, as well as the long-running host of numerous parental wallet-emptying book fairs.

According to Scholastic's 2012 press release, Storia (the DRMed ebook collection currently affected) allowed students and teachers to purchase ebooks and share them with up to 10 family members/students via its proprietary app. (The app is the DRM. Scholastic purchases don't work outside of it. To quote its now-vanished FAQs page: "Storia eBooks are designed with unique learning features and enrichments that make them readable only while using the Storia eReading app.") It also included enhanced content to encourage readers to dig deeper into unfamiliar subjects and allow teachers to connect with downloaded books via Smartboards and other computers. All in all, not a terrible product and one that comes from a particularly trusted name in academic publishing.

Quote
At least Scholastic is being upfront about what's happening to people's purchases.

    The switch to streaming means that eBooks you've previously purchased may soon no longer be accessible.

Quote
But Scholastic is at least trying to mitigate the damage. Some purchases will stay active in users' accounts if customers follow this one simple trick. (Sorry.)

    You may be able to continue using your eBooks by making sure to open them on a bookshelf at least once by October 15.

Unfortunately, there's that troublesome word "may" stuck right in the middle of the damage control. Scholastic's site offers no odds on which books will still work and which purchased items will simply vanish. This is likely due to further licensing agreements behind the scenes -- those between Scholastic and authors/other publishers. (Scholastic handles book fair distribution for high-powered franchises like Harry Potter and Goosebumps.) Chances are, the bigger the title, the greater the likelihood of this maneuver not working. Just as Netflix streaming is 90% stuff no one wants to watch, a switch to an unlimited access streaming service will likely result in a.) the disappearance of titles whose upstream publishers are asking for increased licensing fees or b.) the increased upstream licensing fees pricing Scholastic out of many schools/parents' budgets.

But Scholastic is going further than most companies in the same position would, and doing it proactively (rather than waiting for the angry wisdom of the crowd to shame them into acting like they care).

    Upon your request, we will refund the cost of all Storia eBooks you've purchased. Call Customer Service at 1-855-STORIA1 by August 1, 2015.

I'm sorry, the e-book publishing model, as it currently works, simply sucks thumb down.
311  DonationCoder.com Software / Post New Requests Here / Re: IDEA: Create a modern version of Lotus Agenda on: August 01, 2014, 01:59:17 PM
I used to use Agenda when it first came out. But I soon switched over to GrandView, and then (reluctantly) Ecco when GrandView was discontinued.

To this day, I still prefer a single-panel outline paradigm. And nothing ever worked quite so well for me (YMMV) as GrandView did. Closest ever was MaxThink - although that, by itself, had nowhere near the capabilities that GrandView offered.

Forget Agenda. Bring back GrandView! The 700+ page User Guide can be found here. Give it a skim and you'll see what I mean.

 Cool
312  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: My cat needs your thoughts | RIP Saffron my dearest cat on: July 31, 2014, 05:34:07 PM
Sending the most positive Zen thoughts I possibly can.

[attach]
313  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Interesting "stuff" on: July 31, 2014, 04:20:49 PM


From this article over at Quanta Magazine's website:

Quote
Hints of Life’s Start Found in a Giant Virus



At more than 1.5 micrometers long, pithovirus is the largest virus ever discovered — larger even than some bacteria. Many of its 500 genes are unrelated to any other genes on this planet.


By: Carrie Arnold   


July 10, 2014


Chantal Abergel and Jean-Michel Claverie were used to finding strange viruses. The married virologists at Aix-Marseille University had made a career of it. But pithovirus, which they discovered in 2013 in a sample of Siberian dirt that had been frozen for more than 30,000 years, was more bizarre than the pair had ever imagined a virus could be.

In the world of microbes, viruses are small — notoriously small. Pithovirus is not. The largest virus ever discovered, pithovirus is more massive than even some bacteria. Most viruses copy themselves by hijacking their host’s molecular machinery. But pithovirus is much more independent, possessing some replication machinery of its own. Pithovirus’s relatively large number of genes also differentiated it from other viruses, which are often genetically simple — the smallest have a mere four genes. Pithovirus has around 500 genes, and some are used for complex tasks such as making proteins and repairing and replicating DNA. “It was so different from what we were taught about viruses,” Abergel said.

The stunning find, first revealed in March, isn’t just expanding scientists’ notions of what a virus can be. It is reframing the debate over the origins of life...

What I found particularly fascinating was this paragraph:

Quote
...Abergel and Claverie, however, believe that viruses emerged from cells. While Forterre and collaborators contend that the unique genes found in giant viruses are a sign that they evolved before modern cells, Abergel and Claverie have a different explanation: Giant viruses may have evolved from a line of cells that is now extinct. According to this theory, the ancestor of giant viruses lost its ability to replicate as an independent life form and was forced to rely on other cells to copy its DNA. Pieces of these ancient cells’ genes survive in modern mimivirus, pandoravirus, and pithovirus, which would explain the unique genes found in this group. “Life didn’t have one single ancestor,” Claverie said. “There were a lot of cell-like organisms that were all competing, and there was one winner, which formed the basis for life as we know it today.”

Read the full article (and see the photos) here.
 Cool
314  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Interesting "stuff" on: July 31, 2014, 04:06:15 PM


From this article over at Quanta Magazine's website:

Quote
Hints of Life’s Start Found in a Giant Virus



At more than 1.5 micrometers long, pithovirus is the largest virus ever discovered — larger even than some bacteria. Many of its 500 genes are unrelated to any other genes on this planet.


By: Carrie Arnold   


July 10, 2014


Chantal Abergel and Jean-Michel Claverie were used to finding strange viruses. The married virologists at Aix-Marseille University had made a career of it. But pithovirus, which they discovered in 2013 in a sample of Siberian dirt that had been frozen for more than 30,000 years, was more bizarre than the pair had ever imagined a virus could be.

In the world of microbes, viruses are small — notoriously small. Pithovirus is not. The largest virus ever discovered, pithovirus is more massive than even some bacteria. Most viruses copy themselves by hijacking their host’s molecular machinery. But pithovirus is much more independent, possessing some replication machinery of its own. Pithovirus’s relatively large number of genes also differentiated it from other viruses, which are often genetically simple — the smallest have a mere four genes. Pithovirus has around 500 genes, and some are used for complex tasks such as making proteins and repairing and replicating DNA. “It was so different from what we were taught about viruses,” Abergel said.

The stunning find, first revealed in March, isn’t just expanding scientists’ notions of what a virus can be. It is reframing the debate over the origins of life...

What I found particularly fascinating was this paragraph:

Quote
...Abergel and Claverie, however, believe that viruses emerged from cells. While Forterre and collaborators contend that the unique genes found in giant viruses are a sign that they evolved before modern cells, Abergel and Claverie have a different explanation: Giant viruses may have evolved from a line of cells that is now extinct. According to this theory, the ancestor of giant viruses lost its ability to replicate as an independent life form and was forced to rely on other cells to copy its DNA. Pieces of these ancient cells’ genes survive in modern mimivirus, pandoravirus, and pithovirus, which would explain the unique genes found in this group. “Life didn’t have one single ancestor,” Claverie said. “There were a lot of cell-like organisms that were all competing, and there was one winner, which formed the basis for life as we know it today.”

Read the full article (and see the photos) here.
 Cool
315  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Celluloid vs digital: what are the REAL differences? on: July 31, 2014, 02:21:18 PM
In other words if Q.T. has to switch to digital will his standard bag of tricks no longer work without laboriously relearning how to get the effects?  I'm just speculating.

There's that too. Certain effects and looks are easier (or possible) to achieve with silver vs digital - and vice versa.

I'd guess it's somewhat similar to coding. Experienced professionals have their bag of tricks they're loathe to abandon when shifting from one type of media to another.


316  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Celluloid vs digital: what are the REAL differences? on: July 31, 2014, 12:37:53 PM
There's a tongue-in-cheek heavy metal rant that hits on much of the problem with digital - it's too tempting to abandon discipline and education and just let the technology drive the art form. With the result that a lot of "projects" make it to the screen which have technically advanced production values - but are very poor movies nonetheless.

Here's the rant I mentioned previously. It's about music, and metal, and it's over the top both in both the pronouncements made - and the language used to make them. (NSFW! You have been warned.) But it's spot on once you see the joke and read between the lines to get to what's really being said. I think it applies equally to movie making...or most other art forms.

Check it out:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bT9LUiWXkyo" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bT9LUiWXkyo</a>
317  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: To Hell with Net Neutrality: Sprint to charge extra for Facebook access on: July 31, 2014, 07:28:53 AM
It strikes me more as what they see as a way to put a partial "unlimited" data plan in place.

AFAIK, Sprint doesn't offer new subscribers across the board unlimited data plans any more. I'm grandfathered in on one with AT&T. Which unfortunately makes getting a discounted new phone - or changing any of my existing services a lot of fun since I have to walk through a minefield of fine print and customer 'service' doubletalk to avoid 'accidentally' relinquishing my unlimited data plan when I do. (They almost got me last time.)
 undecided
318  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Movies or films you've seen lately on: July 31, 2014, 06:41:06 AM
@Ren:

[attach]

 Wink Grin
319  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Director wants his film on The Pirate Bay, pirates deliver… on: July 30, 2014, 01:10:39 PM
@Shades - as long as the Netherlands keep producing the likes of Sylvia Kristel, Carice van Houten, Halina Reijn, and Famke Janssen, I'm all for whatever film and breeding program the Dutch have embarked on.  Wink Thmbsup
320  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Cyberfox Anyone? on: July 30, 2014, 01:00:54 PM
For those who like Firefox forks on Linux, there's a native Pale Moon around. smiley

+1! Good recommendation! It's my default choice when I need a full-featured browser running under Linux. Works like a charm for me with Debian-based distros. YMMV. Cool

--------------------

@M - I definitely want to try that portable version of Cyberfox under Windows. I keep hoping I can eventually cram and run all the Windows things I need off a USB key for those increasingly infrequent occasions when I need to be in Windows. If all goes well, my old Windows PC will eventually be relegated to serving as a gaming platform. smiley

321  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Movies or films you've seen lately on: July 30, 2014, 12:54:13 PM
[attach]


The Conspiracy

Clever little faux(???) documentary that transitions rather nicely from the usual "found footage" to a pretty decent thriller. I found it really entertaining throughout - and even thought-provoking at times - despite how little is "new" in this picture.

The premise is simple. Two documentary filmmakers (a couple of semi-hipsters by the names of Aaron and Jim) are researching conspiracy advocates -  not with an interest in finding what truths may lie behind the theories themselves - but rather to gain insight into the minds and backgrounds of the people who do believe in such things.

[attachthumb=#]   [attachthumb=#]   [attachthumb=#]

Things go smoothly until their single best subject, a man by the name of Terrance, suddenly goes missing...

Despite this all being nothing new, the way the film handles what follows makes it a very enjoyable experience. With maybe one or two original surprises along the way?

Quiet Earth's review made a good point about this sort of picture:

Quote
...The "found footage" movie that pretty much jump-started the whole trend that continues to this day is obviously "The Blair Witch Project", and a large part of that film's initial success was the cleverness of a promotional campaign that made it unclear whether or not "Blair Witch" was, in fact, an actual documentary. These days, audiences are way too familiar with this approach, and even the claim in a movie's titles of "Inspired by a true story" doesn't carry the weight it once did. But now, with "The Conspiracy", we get a very different and very welcome riff on the formula. We're obviously watching something that is basically fiction, but that's not the point. The real burning question under everything isn't "Did this really happen?", but rather "Could this, in some form, already be happening?", and director Christopher MacBride uses our uncertainty to weave a fairly disturbing tapestry. The decision to pepper Aaron's and Jim's fictional journey with a veritable onslaught of persistent cultural conspiracy artifacts is not only brilliant but genuinely unnerving, so much so that by the end you may want to immediately head to the books to try and separate the concocted from the documented.

MacBride does a really good job of ramping up a steady crescendo of tension, and in terms of pacing is clearly drawing inspiration from "JFK" and "All the President's Men" (which is referenced directly in one scene). One thing that struck me is that neither Aaron or Jim is particularly charismatic at the film's outset; both have a vaguely smug hipster bent, but by the end I'd done a complete turnaround, and this is to the filmmakers' credit. The fear of the ominous "They" certainly does bring us together and put aside our petty differences, at least for an hour and a half. And what the viewer does with the unease he or she takes from the theater is his or her own business, of course, so I won't try and turn a review into a forum for my own beliefs or theories.

But, "The Conspiracy" is guaranteed to provoke talk, at least in some circles, and regardless of whether or not it's a conscientious whistle-blower or a cynical, cash-in prank (for the record, I'm not sure either way) it's always good to keep this particular discourse alive. After all, the worst case scenario might not be true, and the world's awfulness is just relatively random. But what if it's not? Where "The Conspiracy" excels is in how it compels us to consider if any of us would actually want to know the truth, no matter the cost.

Good flick! Recommended. Thmbsup


322  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Guess how useful virus scanners are? on: July 29, 2014, 04:12:00 PM
I meant "give away" as in, let the enemy know my defenses.

Ah! I see...

Well, I'd like to see any non-pro break through mine even if they did know my setup.

And I'd be very (albeit pleasantly) surprised if (even not knowing anything about my setup) a real professional cyber-baddie couldn't get through.

 Grin
323  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: jv16 PowerTools - using Indiegogo to 'fund'' open-sourcing it on: July 29, 2014, 04:06:30 PM
I had the feeling that this would be the end of this story.  And another blow is dealt to the idea of crowdfunding in the minds of the masses.

Yup.

BTW...is it just me...or do about half the comments posted on the campaign site read like astroturf? undecided
324  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Guess how useful virus scanners are? on: July 29, 2014, 03:08:42 PM
he trouble with arguing against AV on forums, other than that the interest on the other side is vested, is that to make your point you have to give away your disaster avoidance/recovery strategies.

Except for here! Most (all?) of us here freely provide the very same advice and assistance we'll charge our clients to get.

Gotta love DoCo. Kiss Thmbsup
325  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Is Antivirus Software a Waste of Money? on: July 29, 2014, 01:39:21 PM
Given the popularity of the technology, and ease of blending in...those things can be a real bitch to spot. And as a card carrying BOFH, it truly pains me to say it ... But it's damn hard to blame the user for missing one of these.

Agree. This particular client isn't a fool. I've worked with her for about 10 years now. She's actually one of those responsible types who made sure she was tech-saavy above and beyond the requirements of her job. And she was devastated when this thing hit. Especially once she realized just how serious it was. Being a remote-located employee made her especially vulnerable. And being a non-dork, the very first thing she did was assume she herself had done something stupid. (She didn't btw.)

To make it even more interesting, the odds are pretty good that if it actually did come in via an infected attachment (as I suspect it did), the person who sent it to her didn't know it was loaded. Her company passes a lot of attachments back and forth for follow-up work, processing, client contact, etc. Some of it originates in-house. But the rest (60-70%) is generated by their clients. So it could have come from anywhere.

What's disturbing is that their e-mail provider's security didn't twig on it either. Can hardly blame the desktop when it's not showing a blip on the server's scanners, right? Her only warnings were that (a) her machine seemed ever so slightly slower starting up roughly three mornings before everything went south (she manually reboots each morning just to make sure it's "tidy" as she puts it) - and (b) that her scheduled Windows Update check (running daily at midnight and 6:00am) failed to complete two times in a row the day it happened.

This ain't script-kiddie stuff she got hit with. This is definitely the work of pros.

Scary! And just the tip of the iceberg I'm afraid. tellme

Pages: Prev 1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 [13] 14 15 16 17 18 ... 427 Next
DonationCoder.com | About Us
DonationCoder.com Forum | Powered by SMF
[ Page time: 0.061s | Server load: 0.07 ]