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I'm thinking of going primitive, with discursion into zettelkasten

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JavaJones:
But I can't think of a way to get convenient, reliable transclude atomicity in a set of every changing plaintext files without a paying a price re (2). Seems like something has to give. Bet: transclusion will prove so useful that Markdown syntax will be extended for it. Hopefully in a standardized way. NetCommonMark (Net as in networked notes) on the horizon? Once standardized other note apps would have similar transclude views so there would be less of an lock-in effect to the Obsidian editor.
-Nod5 (August 14, 2020, 02:58 AM)
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I can't think of one either. IF you allow arbitrary programs to access *and* edit the data, then all bets are off, period. Unless, of course, those programs all support the same standards. And then it's questionable what value using different programs would have.

Atomicity and transclusion is completely compatible with file-based systems though, as far as I can see. It may have a performance overhead, but there is nothing stopping a tool like Obsidian from having a "working database" or sidecar XML files or whatever it needs to support those raw text files to have extra features like block references and transclusions, etc. There is a repeated distinction made here between "database" and "file based" in relation to things like references, network views, and other things, and I just don't see them being that related. Having everything in a DB may make it easier or faster to do certain things like transclusion (since in theory all text is dynamically generated from the DB in all cases). But as far as I can see a reasonable version of similar functionality can be created using offline, text-based systems with augmentation. If I'm wrong someone please explain it to me. :D

- Oshyan

Nod5:
Unless, of course, those programs all support the same standards. And then it's questionable what value using different programs would have.
-JavaJones (August 14, 2020, 06:14 PM)
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We could then use one specialized tool (Obsidian) most of the time, with all kinds of bells and whistles (graphs, complex search/filtering designed for the specific file format, ...) but now and then use some other tool (VS Code, AutoHotkey, ...) to access some files and do other operations or formatting on them.

There is a repeated distinction made here between "database" and "file based" ... But as far as I can see a reasonable version of similar functionality can be created using offline, text-based systems with augmentation.
-JavaJones (August 14, 2020, 06:14 PM)
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True

wraith808:
Obsidian can't export to markdown because it doesn't contain the notes in the first place. The files have an independent existence and can be edited using any program at any time.
-Dormouse (August 13, 2020, 07:44 PM)
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I don't understand the point of that distinction. They don't need to be exported because they're *already* markdown, aren't they?

- Oshyan

-JavaJones (August 14, 2020, 06:10 PM)
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I think the distinction is that there is no need to export.  With Roam, you're at their mercy if something happens to the service, which iss one of the reasons that I prefer to work on local plain text files.

panzer:
How I use Obsidian to manage my goals, tasks, notes, and software development knowledge base:
https://joshwin.imprint.to/post/how-i-use-obsidian-to-manage-my-goals-tasks-notes-and-software-development-knowledge-base

panzer:
How To Take Notes So Good They Become Your Second Brain:
https://hackernoon.com/how-to-take-notes-so-good-they-become-your-second-brain-yl4r3uhm

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