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How long do hard drives actually live for?

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Stoic Joker:
Gotta stop dwelling in the past I do.-40hz (November 13, 2013, 09:58 AM)
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Na... It's fun! Besides I think you're just screwing with me to make sure I'm awake... :D ...Which I wasn't...which I guess is why we just had a conversation about basically mythical 5300rpm drives. Instead of the 5400 rpm variety which are actually manufactured. (Tehehe - Oops!)

40hz:
Gotta stop dwelling in the past I do.-40hz (November 13, 2013, 09:58 AM)
--- End quote ---

Na... It's fun! Besides I think you're just screwing with me to make sure I'm awake... :D ...Which I wasn't...which I guess is why we just had a conversation about basically mythical 5300rpm drives. Instead of the 5400 rpm variety which are actually manufactured. (Tehehe - Oops!)
-Stoic Joker (November 13, 2013, 11:40 AM)
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Guess who's had two hours sleep in the last 24...c'mon guess!

Besides, what's another 100rpm give or take once you clear 5000 anyway.

(Boy do I ever need 6 straight hours of sleep!) ;D

IainB:
Oops. Sorry. I just noticed that in my comment to @Edvard (above) I had erroneously given the disk rotation speed as:  5700rpm.
Corrected now to what it should have been: 7200rpm.

tomos:
The harddrive rotation speed plot thickens....

IainB:
I did a DuckGo search for "normal operating temperature for hard drives" and came up with lots of useful results. For example, this one from Seagate:
(Copied below sans embedded hyperlinks/images, with some of my emphasis.)
What is the normal operating temperature for Seagate disk drives?

Discusses the normal parameters for operating temperatures for Seagate drives.

The drive should never exceed the temperature ranges below. If the drives ever exceed these temperature ranges then the drive is considered "overheated" or is not getting adequate air flow from your current case environment.

With our newer model drives the maximum temperature is now at 60 degrees Celsius.

The operating temperature range for most Seagate hard drives is 5 to 50 degrees Celsius. A normal PC case should provide adequate cooling.

However, if your enclosure is unable to maintain this range, we suggest that you contact your system manufacturer for information on cooling and ventilation hardware that is compatible with your specific configuration.

The answer to this question depends on your case environment. If you have adequate cooling, it is probably not necessary. If you feel that you need additional cooling, use your favorite internet search engine and enter the keywords "drive bay cooling kit".

REFERENCE TO THIRD PARTIES AND THIRD PARTY WEB SITES. Seagate references third parties and third party products as an informational service only, it is not an endorsement or recommendation - implied or otherwise - of any of the listed companies. Seagate makes no warranty - implied or otherwise - regarding the performance or reliability of these companies or products. Each company listed is independent from Seagate and is not under the control of Seagate; therefore, Seagate accepts no responsibility for and disclaims any liability from the actions or products of the listed companies. You should make your own independent evaluation before conducting business with any company. To obtain product specifications and warranty information, please contact the respective vendor directly. There are links in this document that will permit you to connect to third-party web sites over which Seagate has no control. These links are provided for your convenience only and your use of them is at your own risk. Seagate makes no representations whatsoever about the content of any of these web sites. Seagate does not endorse or accept any responsibility for the content, or use, of any such web sites.

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This rather makes sense, and in the case of the 7200rpm 500Gb 2½" hard drive in my HP ENVY 14 laptop, it corresponds with snapshots of the daily temps, as below. These are reports from Hard Disk Sentinel PRO:

Daily average temps.:
How long do hard drives actually live for?

Daily max temps.:
How long do hard drives actually live for?

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