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How long will it take you to adopt Windows Vista as your OS?

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Deozaan:
It's the difference between a real woman and a slattern, I'd much rather look at an attractive woman than be repelled by a skank.

--- End quote ---
I prefer women that are beatiful WITHOUT makeup, but are drop-dead gorgeous with. Vista is a case of "I can live with this skank when she has a couple of pounds of makeup on".
-f0dder (March 18, 2006, 11:31 PM)
--- End quote ---

Is it just me that finds these comments slightly offensive? Some of us may not be much to look at but we are human beings with the same emotions as everyone else (and perhaps a little more grey matter than women who spend 90% of the time in beauty parlours, in front of the mirror or having surgery).
-Carol Haynes (March 19, 2006, 05:04 AM)
--- End quote ---

You are not alone, Carol.

P.S. That's a lot of quotes.

allen:
It's the difference between a real woman and a slattern, I'd much rather look at an attractive woman than be repelled by a skank.

--- End quote ---
I prefer women that are beatiful WITHOUT makeup, but are drop-dead gorgeous with. Vista is a case of "I can live with this skank when she has a couple of pounds of makeup on".
-f0dder (March 18, 2006, 11:31 PM)
--- End quote ---

Is it just me that finds these comments slightly offensive? Some of us may not be much to look at but we are human beings with the same emotions as everyone else (and perhaps a little more grey matter than women who spend 90% of the time in beauty parlours, in front of the mirror or having surgery).
-Carol Haynes (March 19, 2006, 05:04 AM)
--- End quote ---

The difference here, if I may -- not everyone is expected to be drop dead gorgeous, by any means.  And anyone who says one can be measured by their beauty is a fool.  However, in this instance, the product is largely being sold on an aesthetic basis -- and, like the models in the magazines, if you're selling beauty--then we want beauty.  I don't expect my wife to look like a centerfold--and think no less of her if she doesn't--but, damnit, that centerfold sure better look like one -- that's what she's paid for!

Note: I'm probably the last person who should be drawing this analogy, I don't much care for makeup or centerfold types . . . I like my women like I like my operating system: plain and efficient/sufficient. :)

Cpilot:
Ok before everyone gets carried away with the "slattern" analogy I think a lookup on dictionary.com is in order. First of all it has nothing to do with makeup or beauty. The definition I was going for was the most common ie:

slat┬Ětern n.
An untidy, dirty woman.


--- End quote ---
You see under the conventional definition one has to go out of their way to be untidy and dirty.
The point being, like it or not, most people respond to things that are attractive. If an application or OS is pleasing to someone's eyes they have a tendency to look at it more, instead of flinch away. It's the primary reason there's windows. A lot of stuff can be just as easily done in console mode...but it ain't as purty.

If you care to narrowly define things to their absolute functionality then that's fine. But the truth is for most consumers, of anything, the eye has to be pleased first before they consider quality.
And if you notice for the most part, with almost all shareware offerings there is an attempt to make the application look attractive.
That's just good marketing.
Computers and the web are no longer the sole domain of geeks and techies, as the internet becomes more consumer driven aesthetics will become more important as more and more companies try to get the attention of more and more consumers.
personal feelings aside it's inevitable, and I would rather just try and keep up to date and enjoy whatever benefits the new technology brings. And learn the pitfalls sooner than later.


zridling:
Carol, from the several beta testers I've spoken with, they all love Office 12 once they got accustomed to the lack of a toolbar, which in their words did not take long at all. It does provide backward compatibility, and I spend most of my day between UltraEdit, Microsoft Word, and Excel. Office 2003 was a great bug fix of 2002, but little changed except for speed and stability.

I'll probably buy the premium version of Vista to take advantage of the interface improvements, and have Office 12 within a new OS would be cool. I just don't want to buy two versions, first a 32-bit, and then have to turn around in 2-3 years and buy a 64-bit version of Vista. That would bite, so I'm likely waiting until SP1 comes out.

KaysLover:
I would wait a couple of year at least until the majority of bugs are worked out.   :down:

How long has XP been out and how many fixs' have they released. I can understand that you need fixs' to enhance the product, but the thing that annoys me is the number of security threats that they seem to be plugin.

I seriously hope that they have learned from the security issues and at least visited them in the new version.

Additionally, by waiting a couple of years it will allow new programs to be availabe which will run on 64 bit and hopefully be time to upgrade to a better processor.

That my pennies worth.  8)

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