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Speaking Of: Torrent Sites

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RedPillow:
Might it work for companies, which need to transfer different files and stuff all the day?
Please note, that this doesn`t happend only inside the company, so network-drives wont work.
If we leave out Ftp-servers, how would it work with torrents then?
-RedPillow (March 09, 2010, 03:44 PM)
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Companies that use BitTorrent? You may want to ask Blizzard. They've got a little side-project going right now that uses BitTorrent to deliver updates. It's called World Of Warcraft. Don't know if everyone's heard of that program yet, though.  :D
-Innuendo (March 10, 2010, 09:42 AM)
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 :up: :up:

What an interesting fact, I have never thought that! :O

How about those japanese mmorpg-copies?

Stephen66515:
Might it work for companies, which need to transfer different files and stuff all the day?
Please note, that this doesn`t happend only inside the company, so network-drives wont work.
If we leave out Ftp-servers, how would it work with torrents then?
-RedPillow (March 09, 2010, 03:44 PM)
--- End quote ---

Companies that use BitTorrent? You may want to ask Blizzard. They've got a little side-project going right now that uses BitTorrent to deliver updates. It's called World Of Warcraft. Don't know if everyone's heard of that program yet, though.  :D
-Innuendo (March 10, 2010, 09:42 AM)
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 :up: :up:

What an interesting fact, I have never thought that! :O

How about those japanese mmorpg-copies?
-RedPillow (March 10, 2010, 09:48 AM)
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I know of at least 12 different games companies, who offer their download via BT, and also offer every update to be downloaded in BT format.

Asides from this, there are also multiple audio and software vendors who choose to do the same thing.  Bandwidth is saved, money is saved, and this reflects (sometimes) on the end price of a product, because the community is gathering together to provide the vendor, its downloads.

CWuestefeld:
Bandwidth is saved, money is saved, and this reflects (sometimes) on the end price of a product
-Stephen66515 (March 10, 2010, 11:40 AM)
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I don't think that's true in the big picture. All that's saved is the bandwidth expense for the publisher. But at least as much bandwidth is used overall. The difference is that you are paying for the bandwidth. Of course, since the custom at least in the USA is to purchase unlimited data transfer within the bandwidth, you don't see the difference. But everyone's Internet connection will be slightly higher because of it, offsetting the cheaper price for the software product.

And actually, I bet that it's a net loss overall. FTP is a very efficient protocol, with its sliding windows based on transmission accuracy. But I don't think BT does that, and moreover it must be using additional bandwidth in discovering additional peers.

f0dder:
And actually, I bet that it's a net loss overall. FTP is a very efficient protocol, with its sliding windows based on transmission accuracy. But I don't think BT does that, and moreover it must be using additional bandwidth in discovering additional peers.-CWuestefeld (March 10, 2010, 11:55 AM)
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FTP doesn't have any sliding-windows stuff built in, that's part of TCP, which is also the transfer protocol used by bittorent.

Yes, FTP is very efficient in that it simply streams data at you... but the protocol is borderline retarded, and there's no error-checking or error-recovery built in. Typically the best you can do is check against a .md5 after grabbing the entire file... if that md5 mismatches, go re-grab the entire file again. BitTorrent has per-chunk hashing, meaning you'll only need to re-download failed chunks.

CWuestefeld:
FTP doesn't have any sliding-windows stuff built in, that's part of TCP
-f0dder (March 10, 2010, 12:01 PM)
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You're right of course. I think I was assuming that on a single monolithic FTP transfer, the window size will grow to a large value and stay there for the rest of the transfer. But BT transfers are typically lots of short-lived connections that open and close. In these cases it would start with a small window, and maybe disconnect before it even gets to the max size (I don't know how long that takes). So with BT, a larger portion of the file will be transferred through smaller-sized windows.

In any case, the point that BT simply externalizes the bandwidth costs so that it's borne by other parties (consumers or ISPs) is true regardless.

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