ATTENTION: You are viewing a page formatted for mobile devices; to view the full web page, click HERE.

Special User Sections > N.A.N.Y. 2010

NANY 2010 Final Release: Startup Bully

<< < (2/3) > >>

app103:
This is strictly for removing shortcuts from the startup folder and it wouldn't work with shortcuts added to the quicklaunch.

I probably could make an app to do that, but I don't have a copy of outlook to test it with, nor do I have any applications that have that same behavior that you are experiencing with outlook.

Give me a few more days to finish recovering from the flu and I'll give it a shot.

Cavalcader:
Give me a few more days to finish recovering from the flu and I'll give it a shot.
--- End quote ---
Hope you're feeling better. Having the flu is miserable. :)

What would you think about broadening its horizons a bit? For example, Adobe Reader's so egotistical that it insists on putting shortcuts on the desktop AND in the root of the Start Menu -- the latter every single time you install one of their endless security updates. (At least it leaves the Quick Launch menu alone for now.) Maybe there could be a way to watch specified areas for particular shortcuts, or to even prompt for permission to leave a new shortcut in the Start Menu or on the desktop. That would return control to the end user, instead of letting commercial developers leave droppings all over the place without asking. 8)

A one-stop utility would be ideal, where it could watch the HKLM and HKCU startup keys as well!

app103:
Maybe there could be a way to watch specified areas for particular shortcuts, or to even prompt for permission to leave a new shortcut in the Start Menu or on the desktop. That would return control to the end user, instead of letting commercial developers leave droppings all over the place without asking. 8)

A one-stop utility would be ideal, where it could watch the HKLM and HKCU startup keys as well!
-Cavalcader (March 21, 2010, 03:34 PM)
--- End quote ---

This application doesn't watch for anything.

If you identify the behavior as happening every time you run an application, you would use Startup Bully as an alternative launcher that does a 2 step process of launching the offending app, waiting a bit for it to make the shortcut, then it deletes the shortcut you identified by name (as a command line parameter)...then it exits. It does not stay running in the background to do anything, after it has done its specified job.

It has a very simple design.

If I wanted it to do more than what it does, I'd have to start from scratch and write a whole new app to do it and it would be much more complicated than it currently is.

Furthermore, there already exist utilities that can remove from startup those items that write to the registry to do it. My app was created because there wasn't one to handle the Startup folder shortcut issue, which is an unwanted file being created.

When I ran into the situation with an application, I had a whole bunch of people offer suggestions and various tools to try and none of them worked for the particular case, since it wasn't registry based.

I made a tool to handle that particular case with that particular application.

Startup Bully is a more generic application for use with any application that exhibits the same behavior, not just the one application I came across.

Cavalcader:
This application doesn't watch for anything.-app103 (March 22, 2010, 12:12 AM)
--- End quote ---
Of course -- it was imprecise terminology I used. Scan then. I'd already seen your description of its method to act as a launcher, and that seems like a great approach.

If I wanted it to do more than what it does, I'd have to start from scratch and write a whole new app to do it and it would be much more complicated than it currently is.

Furthermore, there already exist utilities that can remove from startup those items that write to the registry to do it.

--- End quote ---
Sure, I follow you. I'm not trying to make work for you, just suggest that if you feel motivated someday I've never seen an app that lets you monitor for shortcut (*.LNK) creation either by comparing with a previous scan, running in real time, or evaluating timestamps (and I've seen a lot of apps -- maybe more than most).

Then it occurred to me that since your app addresses the Windows startup folder, it might save having to run a variety of tools if one thing covered all those bases described previously and did it well. That's all. Sorry to disturb you -- sometimes people appreciate feedback.

app103:
No, I appreciate the feedback, but the truth is that my app has no idea what is in your startup folder and only looks for the shortcut you specify. It doesn't scan for anything . If it finds the shortcut you specified, it deletes it. If it doesn't, it just exits without doing anything other than launching the app you told it to. It doesn't even know if the app you want it to launch exists. All this info has to be precisely passed to the app as command line parameters.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version