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What books are you reading?

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Josh:
Has anyone read any Christopher Moore or Tom Holt novels? Looking for a good place to start. I am thinking "A Dirty Job" by Christopher Moore.

f0dder:
As a long time C++ coder, I'm still skeptical of the benefits to releasing new versions of C++, but it's a good book, and one of those books where you learn interesting things about language design.  Note: Not suitable for learning C++ only for those with lots of C++ coding experience.-mouser (July 22, 2016, 07:37 PM)
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There's been a lot of important development in C++, especially C++11 - threading and memory model, auto, lambdas.

But there were several times while reading EMC++ where I twitched or frowned. "With all these years of expertise, how could they make this part of the library so convoluted?" and such. Can't remember the specifics, but iirc I frowned at stuff related to time, async/tasks, as well as some of the details about move semantics.

I kinda wish for a "Modern C++" language - something that does away with all the undefined behaviour, bad historic decisions (e.g. most of the standard library), but still retains the good things (super performance, multiparadigm programming, deterministic constructors/destructors)...

mouser:
I kinda wish for
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Exactly.  The coders that have been working to create the new versions of C++ are doing some extremely cool work in an area of language design that is mostly ignored in these days of interpreted code -- given the coder the ability to have true control over creating high performance compiled code.  But they are operating under the excruciating burden of having to be backwards compatible with a lot of gunk, and the need to work around the syntax/keywords of a very old language.  The result is often ugly and unpleasant.

What we need is a new language, inspired by C++ and taking the lessons learned from these new C++ versions, but free from the historical burdens.

MilesAhead:
What we need is a new language, inspired by C++ and taking the lessons learned from these new C++ versions, but free from the historical burdens.

-mouser (July 25, 2016, 02:59 PM)
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Hmmm, awkward to type but it sounds like ++C--.  New C++ with the obsolete stuff amputated.  :)

mouser:
Well, the D programming language was done in this spirit.  There is a good book or two on it.  I never thought it would survive but it has.  Still didn't feel "perfect" to me.

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