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What books are you reading?

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Josh:
I recently got into audiobooks and I am now hooked. I listen to them on the way to work, while on the treadmill, while ruck marching, whenever I can. So far, I have completed 5 books and am on a short story right now.

My first book was one recommended by a co-worker and it is related to the IT/DevOPS culture in any organization. If you've ever worked in an IT or DEV business, check out The Phoenix Project. Almost every character in the story is one I can point out at work. Bottom line, make sure you protect Brent.



The next book was Dark Territory which is a deep history on the start of cyber warfare, ending with the Snowden revelations. This is a great introduction into cyber war and gives some insight into the underground threat market.



The next book was "Countdown to Zero Day". This was a very in-depth history of the Stuxnet worm and I recommend it to anyone who has any interest in cyber war being used for physical destruction.



The next book on my list was an in-depth history of ID Software (Creators of Doom) and the troubles that plagued them (and continue to do so to this day after being purchased by Bethesda and previously with the split-up of the two Johns). Masters of Doom told that tale and showed a couple of developers whose A-Type personalities got the best of both of them (I imagine Jesse being similar to Carmack).



The last book I listened to was "The Martian" by Andy Weir. I listened to this one after watching the movie at least 30 times (it is now my favorite scientific/space movie) and still find new things to like about it each time I watch it. The book was far better than the movie and I recommend it to anyone who watched the film.



Finally, I am listening to what I view as the single most novel idea for a short story. This is an interesting take on the concept of hell and tells one man's journey through this temporary plane of existence. "A short stay in hell", even 30 minutes into it, is well worth it just for the opening chapters.

rjbull:
This is an interesting take on the concept of hell and tells one man's journey through this temporary plane of existence.-Josh (July 16, 2016, 03:04 PM)
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If you like weird stuff, you might like Flann O'Brien's The Third Policeman.

kunkel321:
Just got done reading the uncut version of The Stand (Stephen King).  That's a whole lotta' book--especially for a slow reader like me.

phitsc:
Looks interesting. Which one of these is the first saga?-phitsc (July 15, 2016, 08:21 AM)
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Who are you addressing?

If it's me for the two books by Pernille Rygg, then original publication dates (don't know whether these are original Norwegian, or more likely English translation) are:

The Butterfly Effect (1997)
The Golden Section (2003)
-rjbull (July 15, 2016, 05:09 PM)
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It was related to a book series for which I can't see the post anymore. Either I was addressing a post which has been removed, or I had a digital hallucination.

MilesAhead:
Looks interesting. Which one of these is the first saga?-phitsc (July 15, 2016, 08:21 AM)
--- End quote ---
Who are you addressing?

If it's me for the two books by Pernille Rygg, then original publication dates (don't know whether these are original Norwegian, or more likely English translation) are:

The Butterfly Effect (1997)
The Golden Section (2003)
-rjbull (July 15, 2016, 05:09 PM)
--- End quote ---
It was related to a book series for which I can't see the post anymore. Either I was addressing a post which has been removed, or I had a digital hallucination.
-phitsc (July 18, 2016, 07:36 AM)
--- End quote ---

I prefer my hallucinations analog.  At least then there is some correspondence to reality.  :)

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