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Author Topic: Digg Revolt  (Read 2493 times)

Cpilot

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Digg Revolt
« on: May 02, 2007, 04:47:32 PM »
Instead of repeating the whole thing again here, here's a quote and a link.

Quote
It seems that Digg, the user powered community, has found themselves on the back end of a user revolt.
A user submitted the HD-DVD AACS Processing Key number,which can be used to unlock the copy protection for Hi-Def movies, to the site.
Apparently Digg decided that it exposed them to some liability and then deleted the post.
Well the original poster then reposted it and then reportedly went to bed only to find his post deleted and his account at Digg suspended.
Well throughout the night and the next morning it created quite a fuss, and as the article relates it became the top Digg, and then suddenly it all disappeared.
Most blogs and articles, when writing about what happened next, label the reaction a "user revolt" with other users by the thousands posting the same encryption code over and over.
So many in fact that it became apparent that Diggs editors couldn't possibly keep up with or remove all the posts and posters.


What has Digg dug for themselves?


*edited to add a little more info*
« Last Edit: May 02, 2007, 06:15:01 PM by Cpilot »

tinjaw

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Re: Digg Revolt
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2007, 05:09:14 PM »
Thanks for bringing this to our attention. I stopped reading digg a long time ago, so I didn't see this first hand. However, I am very interested to see how this plays out.

Cpilot

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Re: Digg Revolt
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2007, 05:36:40 PM »
I'm curious as well, there are several issues at play with this that can have some real consequences as far as what is allowed on these sites and what is not.
It could also stifle the concept that Digg and other websites are based on.

Just the litigation potential itself could change a lot of things.

Cpilot

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Re: Digg Revolt
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2007, 06:17:38 PM »
Oh oh
Left out some important info in the original post.
The reason it became a revolt was the overwhelming number of posters who reposted the original encryption key.