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Last post Author Topic: What's a good memorization software?  (Read 30974 times)

Armando

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Re: What's a good memorization software?
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2008, 09:14:43 PM »
Along the same lines as Mnemosyne, Anki http://ichi2.net/anki/  I think one is based on the other, not sure which way.  Anki has a few more ways to display content (pictures, sound files, etc).  I tried both, they both work well.

Kevin

Thanks Kevin!
Looks nice.  :up:
Will install it next weekend...

john_hammond

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Re: What's a good memorization software?
« Reply #26 on: October 23, 2008, 03:48:15 AM »
For Mac I use MindBurn and now I see that there is something similar for Windows too. BetterMemo (http://www.bettermemo.com) seems to be a blend between SuperMemo and MindBurn. It does not have all the bells & whistles of SM, but I find the interface very easy to use. Mnemosyne is fair choice too, but I find it's deck organizing capabilities inferior to those of BetterMemo.

bigfuture

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Re: What's a good memorization software?
« Reply #27 on: October 20, 2009, 12:51:59 PM »
I my opinion, Anki is the best:
- the friendly interface;
- the media options (recording speech, Ctrl+C images, videos support etc.);
- the algorithm Anki used is the same of Supermemo 2 (but if Anki, in future, use a neural network, with seven memory classifications, like Fullrecall, it would be better, I think), probably because that Supermemo patent has expired;
- It seems that the program are always being improved, there are plugins etc.;
- Anki is available for G1/Android Google smartphone (http://ichi2.net/anki/wiki/AndroidAnki)
- Anki is entirely free (there is no "premium" version).
- There are the options of "cloud computing" (online) and desktop (that I use) computing.

Fullrecall is good, it uses a neural network, it is simpler than Supermemo (with this you spend more time learning about the program then studding your study object), but the interface is poor (like softwares of 10 years ago) there are less resources than Anki. Maybe the premium version be better, but I prefer use Anki and make known this software (and support it with a donation, of course, for stimulating its improvement).

Supermemo: a software that Piotr Wozniak has created for himself (and other computer scientists...).

(forgiven my English, I'm Brazilian, native Portuguese speaker) 

superboyac

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Re: What's a good memorization software?
« Reply #28 on: October 20, 2009, 01:49:35 PM »
Supermemo: a software that Piotr Wozniak has created for himself (and other computer scientists...).
;D It's funny...because it's so true!

superboyac

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Re: What's a good memorization software?
« Reply #29 on: October 20, 2009, 01:56:57 PM »
Fullrecall, it would be better, I think), probably because that Supermemo patent has expired;
- It seems that the program are always being improved, there are plugins etc.;
- Anki is available for G1/Android Google smartphone (http://ichi2.net/anki/wiki/AndroidAnki)
- Anki is entirely free (there is no "premium" version).
- There are the options of "cloud computing" (online) and desktop (that I use) computing.

Fullrecall is good, it uses a neural network, it is simpler than Supermemo (with this you spend more time learning about the program then studding your study object), but the interface is poor (like softwares of 10 years ago) there are less resources than Anki. Maybe the premium version be better, but I prefer use Anki and make known this software (and support it with a donation, of course, for stimulating its improvement).
I wouldn't say Full Recall's interface is poor, like it's a negative thing.  It's very effective.  It may be more accurate to say it lacks certain fancy html features in the card contents.  I love Full Recall, I think it is a very effective and well designed application.

fikio

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Re: What's a good memorization software?
« Reply #30 on: July 29, 2011, 02:49:46 PM »
Came across this website while looking for information on spaced repetition programs, and not only is this a very interesting site but this the most interesting discussion of these types of software that I have found.

Has anyone continued to use FullRecall over the past couple years? There is a lot of data on Supermemo as well as learning statistics of long-term users that show that it is extremely effective, but I'm not sure if anything exists for Fullrecall, and although it uses neural networks and this is a task that might be quite amenable to this technique, it has not panned out in other fields.

I don't think anything is wrong with the Supermemo interface. There is definitely a learning curve but since I am past that it doesn't bother me anymore and there are a number of sophisticated things that Supermemo can do that probably cannot be done by any other software.

Anki and Mnemosyne are both based on an old Supermemo algorithm so I imagine that the new SMs must be dramatically superior although the author of Anki disagrees and has written on his website why the older SM algorithm might actually be superior.