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SuperboyAC's DC blog #3 (My Unique Data Backup Solution)

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Liquidmantis:
Great post.  I'll comment on the RAID not being a backup.  The main point for most home users is that you can't recover accidently deleted or corrupted files from RAID (luck with undelete/recovery utilities notwithstanding).

For us in-shop, RAID became too problematic as you multiply your failure points.  Typical motherboard on-board RAID controllers might be good for joining a couple of disks and giving some illusions of performance gain, but for actual RAID member recovery they are really weak.  Even high-end commercial RAID enclosures have issues as they get older.  We've had a few that have dropped another member drive while restoring a newly added replacement drive and ended up losing arrays.  Restoration is really taxing on drives.  Now we only use RAID for performance and large data volume.  It's not even a consideration in our backup regime other than the fact that setting it up for parity and hotspares might save us from downtime.

superboyac:
how do we order the record!!
-mouser (May 10, 2007, 02:09 AM)
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No record yet.  But when we do, it's yours, compliments of the house.  You can download the track off of the site anyway.

SuperboyAC, Can you recommend some CDs of jazz organ trios as well?
-urlwolf (May 10, 2007, 07:24 AM)
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There are so many.  Just about anything from Jimmy Smith would be pretty good (assuming you don't get any of his weird stuff).  Our band is named after his album titled "Root Down".

Tony Monaco has excellent albums, two of my favorites being "Fiery Blues" and "East to West".

If you like tenor sax with the the organ trio, check out Hank Crawford and Jimmy McGriff in "Right Turn on Blue".  And of course there's the legendary Houston Person, who I had the great pleasure of becoming friends with recently.  He has a couple of nice organ sessions with a budding, 19-year-old Joey DeFrancesco on "The Party!" and "Why Not".

superboyac:
Great post.  I'll comment on the RAID not being a backup.  The main point for most home users is that you can't recover accidently deleted or corrupted files from RAID (luck with undelete/recovery utilities notwithstanding).

For us in-shop, RAID became too problematic as you multiply your failure points.  Typical motherboard on-board RAID controllers might be good for joining a couple of disks and giving some illusions of performance gain, but for actual RAID member recovery they are really weak.  Even high-end commercial RAID enclosures have issues as they get older.  We've had a few that have dropped another member drive while restoring a newly added replacement drive and ended up losing arrays.  Restoration is really taxing on drives.  Now we only use RAID for performance and large data volume.  It's not even a consideration in our backup regime other than the fact that setting it up for parity and hotspares might save us from downtime.
-Liquidmantis (May 10, 2007, 09:25 AM)
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Thanks, I think that helps explain it. 

Tekzel:

Thanks, I think that helps explain it. 
-superboyac (May 10, 2007, 11:59 AM)
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Here, let me take a stab at it too.  While a raid MIRROR can be used as a backup RAID configurations of any flavor can only help you versus one type of failure: physical.  It can't save you from data corruption or your own error.  Any corruption or user modifications will be propagated to the mirror or other drives in the array.

My backup is just an external USB2 drive and Acronis TrueImage 10.  I have a folder on the drive set up as a backup location with 1 full image and 4 incrementals in a set, then it repeats with a full image again.  I have it set to keep 10 total backups, so it keeps 2 sets (weekdays only).  That gives me the ability to recover from a full hard drive failure or recover up to two weeks back  from my own stupidity (something deleted I shouldn't have, or screwed up by me) or through something else going wrong to the file system, etc.  RAID can't help you if you accidently delete a file and don't catch it for a few days (so undelete is unlikely), but a backup rotation can.

mouser:
That gives me the ability to recover from a full hard drive failure or recover up to two weeks back  from my own stupidity (something deleted I shouldn't have, or screwed up by me)
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This is a really important point and it's why i stress so much the need for a versioning update system as i dicussed in my old power-user backup article: http://www.donationcoder.com/Reviews/Archive/BackUpGuide/index.html

The thing to remember is that if all you are ever doing is making a full backup of your system, and you only keep one copy, then you can become your own worst enemy, because the more frequently you re-backup, the more frequently you are permanently making unrecoverable any older file you accidentally deleted or corrupted without realizing it.

You need to have some backup regime that allows you to say "oops! i just realized i overwrote my novel with a shopping list last week", and then be able to get the week (or month) old copy back.  That's why i favor both a full-image backup procedure, AND an independent backup system which makes versioned preserved backups of my key working documents.

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