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Author Topic: The limits of attention  (Read 3011 times)

KenR

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The limits of attention
« on: March 05, 2007, 03:49:11 PM »
Here's an interesting article that discusses the impact of increasing amounts of information on attention.

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It is no secret that we live in an information overload age. The explosion of new types of information online is a double-edged sword. We both enjoy and drown in news, blogs, podcasts, photos, videos and cool MySpace pages. And the problem is only going to get worse, as more and more people discover the new web. Consider the two charts below, illustrating the growth of the Blogosphere at large...

Kenneth P. Reeder, Ph.D.
Clinical Psychologist
Jacksonville, North Carolina  28546

tinjaw

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Re: The limits of attention
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2007, 07:15:19 PM »
Nice find Ken. Read/WriteWeb often has some juicy morsels. At the risk of opening old wounds  :-\ I a-gri that one's attention is a valuable resource that is not to be wasted or taken lightly. I am a big advocate of the attention economy being very important in more ways then people tend to grasp at first hand. As someone with ADD I have seen many of the problems of Continuous Partial Attention from a young age. It has always been a problem for knowledge thirsty ADDers, but it is even becoming more widespread with the post-MTV generation and the Internet.