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Author Topic: Software for planning wood bookcases/cabinets/tables etc?  (Read 40946 times)
mouser
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« Reply #100 on: April 06, 2010, 09:49:43 AM »

 Grin

the other thing that's worth saying, in terms of how awkward it is to have to remove that upper cabinet above the new stove location.. is that the area above the stove's "old" location is going to be completely empty with no cabinets, and needs to remain that way for visual flow.. so it's a huge waste not to have the oven in it's original location..
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cranioscopical
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« Reply #101 on: April 06, 2010, 02:33:12 PM »

the area above the stove's "old" location is going to be completely empty with no cabinets, and needs to remain that way for visual flow.. so it's a huge waste not to have the oven in it's original location..
There are good arguments and counter-arguments( Wink) for either alternative. Given the right drill bits I still don't see that it would be a big problem to anchor to the floor.  The correct base would probably let you get away without fixing to the wall, though it shouldn't be hard to find out what's where behind the wall.
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Chris
mouser
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« Reply #102 on: April 06, 2010, 05:22:09 PM »

people are going to inevitably end up leaning on it as they lean into the kitchen. anything less than it feeling rock solid stable is going to be noticeable and disconcerting, and get worse over time.

it's a cement floor underneath, with tile on one side and hardwood on the other.  i will have to use masonry nails or screws to hammer through the base of the cabinet into the floor.  if i try to put the base on top of the tile and secure tightly, i am getting i will crack the kitchen tiles its halfway on.  then i will have to screw/nail THROUGH the hardwood tiles (or remove them).. and trying to get an ultra stable attachment with the differences in heights between tile and hardwood might not work, and shims might not work for something that has to be secured so tightly to floor. i could try to remove the hardwood and tile under it but i don't know how well that would go and what kind of permanent commitment that is.

i mean this was the original plan, i'm just getting really cold feet about the things that can go wrong, and the fact that it will be almost impossible to turn back once i embark on trying to permanently attach that half wall to the floor..



another set of alternate images with oven moved, and cabinets above removed:


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cranioscopical
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« Reply #103 on: April 06, 2010, 06:22:33 PM »

I guess it depends what's under the cement under the tiles. If it were me, and I wanted to leave the existing floor as intact as possible, I'd make a solid base whose external dimensions were the same as the internal dimensions of your cabinet. I'd secure that to the floor with sufficient, suitable screws, first having shimmed it level. That would give you a robust start. I might even mount some L-brackets on that base in order to give added rigidity to the back of the cabinet. I'd then drop the cabinet over the base and secure it, probably with horizontal screws. Now your cabinet is attached to a virtually immovable platform, and possibly even reinforced with L-brackets. You'd cover the horizontal screws with the kick-plate trim on the base of the cabinet. It's not that big a job to drill clearance holes through the tile and/or hardwood and then insert suitable screw anchors into the cement (if that's sufficiently thick/durable). An additional benefit is that using a solid base should spread the force of the screws and prevent tiles from cracking. Your local hardware store will advise you about the right fixings.

That said, you just can't beat a one-piece top (as in your latest image Cabinets removed) as a way to give the cabinet maximum rigidity.

Looks as if you'll have to give up something and moving the stove puts it into a much better position.  So, losing the cabinet puts the stove in a better place and removes your anxieties about stability and inadvertent demolition Grin

Of course, you could leave things as they are. Just because you've had an idea, that doesn't make it the best course to adopt, upon mature reflection.

Or, have you considered moving? Grin Grin
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Chris
mouser
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« Reply #104 on: April 06, 2010, 06:35:00 PM »

thanks for all of the thoughts chris smiley

the point about having a very secure base would be my plan, similar to yours.. however i think it may not be as straightforward to secure the base to the floor as you say.. using shims is of course the normal thing, but for a base that has to be rock solid attached to the floor, i just dont know how problematic that would -- i have plastic shim material that wont change size much but still.. and having the base on top of the tile and then trying to really put that base in tight.. i think the chance of cracking those tiles that the base is half-way on is high (and they are big 12"x12" tiles).  i could however cheat a little and make the island BASE a little narrower and avoid resting it on any tiles.

it definitely IS possible to do, and has been my plan until i started thinking about how much nicer it would be if i didn't have to muck with anchoring to the floor.

now i'm unsure.

and yes, i'm very much considering whether this is worth it.. modeling it almost satisfies me enough to not have to do it in real life.
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mouser
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« Reply #105 on: April 06, 2010, 06:36:24 PM »

Quote
losing the cabinet puts the stove in a better place

i'm not sure -- it's better in that it's recessed and closer to sink.. its worse in that the whole point of this change is to open up the two rooms and now it would be harder to talk with dining room people from the new stove position compared to old.  at least a little.
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cranioscopical
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« Reply #106 on: April 06, 2010, 06:47:10 PM »

its worse in that the whole point of this change is to open up the two rooms and now it would be harder to talk with dining room people from the new stove position compared to old.
Yebbut, you have to consider your guests! They might prefer you to shut the heck up and get on with the cooking!  Wink

Mainly, though, moving the stove is the only way I can see that obviates your anxieties about both stability and construction, by providing a top surface that is also an anchor.  Unless... you take another tack and make the cabinet both free-standing and mobile.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2010, 06:49:54 PM by cranioscopical » Logged

Chris
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« Reply #107 on: April 06, 2010, 06:53:25 PM »

If i had an extra $3,000 i could use a separate cooktop and wall oven like so:


in many ways that seems to be the best of all worlds, albeit the most expensive one by a wide margin.
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cranioscopical
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« Reply #108 on: April 06, 2010, 10:01:21 PM »

If i had an extra $3,000 i could use a separate cooktop and wall oven like so: (see attachment in previous post)
in many ways that seems to be the best of all worlds, albeit the most expensive one by a wide margin.
In my ever so humble opinion, one of the best investments you can make is in improving the quality of life. If you plan on staying where you are for a while it might be well worth the extra cost. Solves your wall cupboard issue, the 'island' stability issue, and warms those chilly feet of yours.
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Chris
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« Reply #109 on: April 06, 2010, 10:18:57 PM »

Would you be haning a range hood/extractor fan over the cooktop? Just wondering...
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mouser
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« Reply #110 on: April 07, 2010, 02:02:29 AM »

darwin, regarding vent -- i have no hood now, and there is no outside vent for it.. if i do end up moving the oven i may get a recirculating (ductless) vent.. though i have no idea if those actually "do" anything useful.
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Darwin
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« Reply #111 on: April 07, 2010, 06:30:08 AM »

Heh, heh - we have a recirculating hood and it's not much use at all... (though, to be fair, it IS better than no hood at all.
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cranioscopical
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« Reply #112 on: April 07, 2010, 06:29:40 PM »

Quote from: mouser
i have no hood now, and there is no outside vent for it..
Aha! Another opportunity to live dangerously!
You'll need a cold chisel, club hammer and a few other odds and ends.
Don't worry too much about breaking through into the neighboring apartment…
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Chris
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« Reply #113 on: April 07, 2010, 08:09:45 PM »

darwin, regarding vent -- i have no hood now, and there is no outside vent for it.. if i do end up moving the oven i may get a recirculating (ductless) vent.. though i have no idea if those actually "do" anything useful.

They make a lot of noise, which I suppose is intended to give the impression that they are actually doing something, though that doesn't stand up too well when your kitchens full of steam (or smoke embarassed)

and despite the amount of noise they make, it still isn't enough to drown out the damn smoke detectors... 
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mouser
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« Reply #114 on: October 04, 2010, 10:03:59 AM »

latest mini bookcase projects:



note that there is no good reason for me to be building these things.. i need to stop trying to fill up space.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2010, 10:06:53 AM by mouser » Logged
mouser
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« Reply #115 on: October 16, 2010, 08:55:34 AM »

I spent yesterday building and adding these upper doors to a hallway built-in:
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Darwin
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« Reply #116 on: October 16, 2010, 09:16:41 AM »

Wow! Mouser - you're inspiring! My entire house needs to be done - paint, mouldings, flooring - it's been over four years and I haven't done a thing. Looking at your beautiful cabinetry and shelving makes me want to get on with it  Thmbsup

Anyway, that was a round-about way of saying AWESOME!
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mouser
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« Reply #117 on: October 16, 2010, 09:20:15 AM »

it is surprising how much pleasure one gets out of walking past something that you've built smiley
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cranioscopical
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« Reply #118 on: October 16, 2010, 10:38:34 AM »

it is surprising how much pleasure one gets out of walking past something that you've built smiley
Instead of having to stop and work more on it.  Wink

I hope you do realize that, soon, either you'll have to move or you'll have to begin building smaller cupboards inside the larger ones.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2010, 10:41:25 AM by cranioscopical » Logged

Chris
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« Reply #119 on: October 22, 2010, 01:50:06 PM »

Mouser, when will you build your first house? tongue
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- carpe noctem
mouser
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« Reply #120 on: October 22, 2010, 05:19:57 PM »

good question.. surely now that i've learned how to make bookcases i know all i need to know in order to build a complete house, right?
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f0dder
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« Reply #121 on: October 22, 2010, 05:37:18 PM »

exactly! tongue
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cranioscopical
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« Reply #122 on: October 22, 2010, 05:53:46 PM »

good question.. surely now that i've learned how to make bookcases i know all i need to know in order to build a complete house, right?
Tip: with a house, it feels better to have a roof over your bed.
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Chris
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« Reply #123 on: December 21, 2011, 08:50:47 PM »

Another little cabinet at the back entrance (the one on the left is the new one):
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Josh
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« Reply #124 on: December 21, 2011, 08:58:49 PM »

Are you getting your contractors license anytime soon smiley
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