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Last post Author Topic: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal  (Read 1988 times)

anandcoral

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #25 on: June 06, 2018, 09:45 AM »
I don't understand how business works
I agree with Mouser.

Even after so many discussion, I too do not understand MS intention. Only am afraid, as I was for FoxPro, which came true.

Regards,

Anand

Deozaan

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #26 on: June 06, 2018, 11:30 AM »
Just read an article about why GitHub is worth that kind of money to Microsoft here:

https://www.bloomber...-billion-undo-button

Eh... If you count this throw-away line as explaining why it is worth that much money:

Enter GitHub in 2008. GitHub makes it easier for large, loosely coordinated groups of programmers—in corporations, for instance—to use git. It has a well-designed web interface. If you don’t think that’s worth $7.5 billion, you’ve never read the git manual.

Personally, I'm not satisfied with that answer. But then again, I've never read the git manual.

Dormouse

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #27 on: June 06, 2018, 01:55 PM »
I don't understand how business works

Simples.
MS think GitHub is worth more than $7.5bn if they control it.
GitHub owners think it is worth less.
Neither share their ideas about valuation, but both think their lot is improved by the sale.

Whether either has any sense is another matter. And who is right can only be known in the fullness of time.

I've not seen a single comment anywhere giving a calculated value, so I doubt if anyone knows.

wraith808

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #28 on: June 06, 2018, 06:09 PM »
Gitlab runs on Microsoft Azure.
https://twitter.com/.../1004087778760646656


Thanks for that.  Gave me a laugh on a day when I needed one...

Deozaan

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f0dder

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #30 on: July 15, 2018, 04:20 PM »
(Although I wonder why most people ignore the fact that they are mad about their preferred "DVCS" hoster being bought... Git's target audience does not seem to be the brightest of all.)
Are you implying they're silly because "it's DVCS, they can just move elsewhere"?

In that case, please keep in mind that the repository hosting is the smallest part of what GitHub offers - it's all the stuff built on top and around that makes it worthwhile.

Also, many projects and even programming languages (talking to you, Go!) natively integrate GitHub as their package repository. That means that not only the official source would be gone for a while - large parts of the software world wouldn't even compile anymore. That's a bad sign.
Same goes for the JVM world and the main maven repository, the node.js hipsters and npm, et cetera.

Is there any language/ecosystem that has a nice package repository without a single point of failure?
- carpe noctem

Tuxman

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #31 on: July 15, 2018, 04:33 PM »
Are you implying they're silly because "it's DVCS, they can just move elsewhere"?

I am implying that the hostname of the upstream DVCS repository does not matter to anyone who even remotely understands his shiny plaything.

In that case, please keep in mind that the repository hosting is the smallest part of what GitHub offers - it's all the stuff built on top and around that makes it worthwhile.

Like what? The issue tracker? Indeed, it is a rather dumb idea to sacrifice yourself to voluntary vendor lock-in - but that's not Microsoft's fault at all. As if Microsoft would endanger your precious bug reports...

Same goes for the JVM world and the main maven repository, the node.js hipsters and npm, et cetera.

Agree.

Is there any language/ecosystem that has a nice package repository without a single point of failure?

Every centralized repository is a single point of failure. IMO, the sanest approach is C's: You'll just get your headers/libs from your OS vendor.

f0dder

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #32 on: July 15, 2018, 04:56 PM »
I am implying that the hostname of the upstream DVCS repository does not matter to anyone who even remotely understands his shiny plaything.
Yes, this detail doesn't matter that much - there's an inconvenience in getting all the references fixed, and that's it. That you're suggesting this is the issue is silly, though, since it's really about #2.

Like what? The issue tracker? Indeed, it is a rather dumb idea to sacrifice yourself to voluntary vendor lock-in - but that's not Microsoft's fault at all. As if Microsoft would endanger your precious bug reports...
Issue tracker, pull requests, wiki, github pages, discoverability, the social aspect. The integrated two-factor auth stuff... teams... stats... the commercial support... access control... vulnerability scanning... GitHub is a really well-working and polished product. It gives you loads of features you don't get with a bare "just a file storage bucket" repository.

You can't avoid vendor lock-in unless you go for an on-premise solution. It's been a while since I checked out GitLab (but they do both cloud and on-prem, right?) - but I've worked a fair bit with Atlassians Stash/BitBucket. It can run on-prem, but it's not open-source, and while it's a good product, it's lagging quite a bit behind what GitHub offers.

And sure, Git is a DVCS. But in and by itself it's not super effective for collaboration, especially when you're outside a single team or company... you need an additional layer on top of the raw DVCS. If everybody runs different systems, collaboration gets harder.

Every centralized repository is a single point of failure. IMO, the sanest approach is C's: You'll just get your headers/libs from your OS vendor.
You've got to be joking.

There's so much wrong with this idea that I don't even know where to start - that'll be for tomorrow :)
- carpe noctem

Tuxman

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #33 on: July 15, 2018, 04:58 PM »
If you absolutely don't want to self-host your stuff, you will be surprised how evil all companies are when it comes to making money ...  :D
Atlassian makes absolutely awesome software IMO.

And no - I'm never joking!

Shades

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #34 on: July 15, 2018, 10:17 PM »
It's been a while since I checked out GitLab (but they do both cloud and on-prem, right?)

@f0dder:
Yes in both cases. Last Friday I started running a docker image of GitLab (Community Edition) on a test server in my own network, just to see for myself what the fuss is about. So far it leaves a good impression, but you can expect to lose quite some time configuring it. The enterprise edition has more features, so that will be even more "fun".

Although it is more work, I would recommend to do a GitLab installation from the ground up. The Docker solution (or similar software) is decent, but I barely see how Docker is helping me for my particular use-cases.

In any case, GitLab does work on-premise. Documentation is handled well. As far as I have seen it at least. But don't expect it to run on a Windows server any time soon, if at all. It looks like it will be a Linux and MacOS only product. On my Ubuntu Server 18.04 LTS computer it works fine. The Docker website indicates that there is a 'Docker for Windows' application available (which doesn't work on Windows Server 2012 R2), but that it not officially supported. And if you do have 'Docker for Windows' running on your system, the GitLab website says that they will not support GitLab with that software anyway. In short, if you want to run GitLab on Windows, you are on your own.
 

f0dder

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Re: Microsoft to buy GitHub in $7.5B all-stock deal
« Reply #35 on: July 16, 2018, 12:07 PM »
Although it is more work, I would recommend to do a GitLab installation from the ground up. The Docker solution (or similar software) is decent, but I barely see how Docker is helping me for my particular use-cases.
Docker is pretty great, even if you don't plan to use it for scaling out. All setup and configuration is codified, so you don't miss a point in an install step, and getting an instance up and running is fast. The isolation it offers is pretty good as well - not as good as a full-blown VM, of course, but because of how lightweight it is, you can afford to containerize pretty much all the services you have running on a single machine.

And there's lots of other nice uses for it. Like, being able to create a Linux filesystem image (think custom RaspBerry Pi or custom device firmware) from a Windows or macOS machine, without booting up a VM and transferring files in and out of that. Or making sure everybody on the team has a similar runtime dev env for testing, regardless of host OS. Or being able to build <whatever_language>*<whatever_version> binaries without drowning in dependency hell on a single host OS.

While Docker for Windows is great for development work, I wouldn't run production stuff on it - it's simply not ready for that kind of prime-time yet. There's performance issues as well as bugs... we have a customer who insists on running stuff on Windows servers (because that's what their hosting company knows, and they use that hosting company because the CEOs are buddy-bros) - we have to restart the stuff because the current stable version has a bad leak in vpnkit. Ouch.
- carpe noctem