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Windows 10 Announced

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Arizona Hot:
Windows 10 Announced

The latest blue smoke from Microsoft.

IainB:
A very dear friend of mine died prematurely of cancer a while back, and left me his two laptops for my children to use:

* Compaq Presario CQ61 (32-bit) with Windows 7 Home Premium with 1x2Gb RAM
* HP Mini 110-3500 (Intel Atom CPU, 32-bit) small netbook-type laptop with Windows 7 Starter with 1x1Gb RAM
I beefed up the 1x2Gb RAM in the Compaq by the addition an extra 1x1Gb RAM in the 2nd (empty) RAM slot. That made it 3Gb in total and it ran much better. I shall eventually replace that with 1x2Gb RAM, making 4Gb in total.
I beefed up the RAM in the HP Mini by replacing the 1x1Gb RAM with 1x2Gb RAM (it only has the one RAM slot). It ran incredibly slowly before the RAM upgrade, and reasonably well after the upgrade. It's OK, but a bit slow.

I then ran all the updates for the Win7 OS on each laptop. They had not been updated for about a year, so it took a while.
Eventually The Win10 update adverts started on the Compaq, but not on the HP Mini, so I guess the latter can't support Win10, so it's stuck with Win7 Starter.

Before I allow the Win10 update to install on the Compaq, I thought I'd ask members on this forum of their experiences with making that change.
Was it worth making the change from Win7 to Win10?
As it stands, the Compaq runs very nicely under Win7 HP, even before the last extra 1Gb RAM has been added.

Ath:
Before I allow the Win10 update to install on the Compaq, I thought I'd ask members on this forum of their experiences with making that change.
...
As it stands, the Compaq runs very nicely under Win7 HP, even before the last extra 1Gb RAM has been added.
-IainB (March 10, 2016, 03:45 AM)
--- End quote ---
I'd suggest to take the plunge, and see how performance holds up after the upgrade. If it's too poor, you can always revert within the first 30 days.
Do make a proper disk-image backup before starting ofc. but you knew that already :up:

cranioscopical:
PieceI thought I'd ask members on this forum of their experiences with making that change.
-IainB (March 10, 2016, 03:45 AM)
--- End quote ---
Assuming you're okay with allowing or thwarting the Google-y phone-home stuff…

Mine were all in-place "upgrades" because I'm lazy and didn't want to mess around with a slew of Adobe CS and other licenses.
All of the machines run Pro versions of Windows.

Piece of cake on a relatively simple x32 (but x64 capable machine that stayed x32 for the time being). It was running 7, then 8.1, now 10.
The main requirement was that it look and behave like XP, which it does after a minimum of tweaking.
The machine has only 2GB RAM and seems to run slightly better than under 8.1.

Mild aggravation on a x64 machine with a ton of software. Nothing that couldn't be overcome by knocking out some security stuff and a couple of other pieces. W10 completely screwed up the reversion process. I tried that only to see what it could do. I have adequate backups, so I didn't much care. This one certainly runs okay but I don't think it runs better than it did with 8.1.

Serious aggravation on my own machine, to the point where I figured that only a clean installation would suffice.
Just before going to a clean installation I had one more go at an in-place upgrade. First, I uninstalled or disabled quite a bit of additional stuff.
That one worked but, by the time I got round to it, I was using a later release than I had been previously.
That machine runs perfectly well under W10 even after my bringing back all of the stuff that I had 'turned off'.

My main purpose in upgrading two of the three machines was to save myself the bother of remembering the ins and outs of different O/S versions. All in all I'd say that making the change was worth it to me for the small increments in security and, in one case, performance.

If you hope to exceed the display options provided by Microsoft, do make sure that you first collect video drivers that will work with your machines under W10. It sounds as if that won't be a problem with the machines that you described. With the computers you mentioned I believe that updates will be forced down your throat. I wouldn't consider allowing that unless there were scrupulously maintained backups. Several of those updates have caused me some grief (probably due to lingering issues deriving from in-place upgrades).
 







Deozaan:
Windows 10 isn't perfect, but all-in-all, I generally find it to be a nice upgrade from Windows 7. (I skipped Windows 8 completely.)

That said, Windows 7 is a nice OS. Stick with it if you're happy with it.

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