Home | Blog | Software | Reviews and Features | Forum | Help | Donate | About us
topbanner_forum
  *

avatar image

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
  • October 01, 2016, 12:17:13 PM
  • Proudly celebrating 10 years online.
  • Donate now to become a lifetime supporting member of the site and get a non-expiring license key for all of our programs.
  • donate

Last post Author Topic: XP to Windows 7 advice  (Read 9038 times)

AndyM

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 616
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
XP to Windows 7 advice
« on: March 02, 2014, 10:50:23 AM »
I'm thinking of upgrading my 6 year old Vostro 1700 XP pro laptop to Windows 7.

I need to replace Outlook Express (which I like), and I don't want to use web-based email like GMail.  Last time I thought about upgrading, I figured I'd use Mozilla Thunderbird.  I have Outlook 2002 but really dislike it.

I'm still using Word 2002 and Excel 2002.  I can't afford to upgrade these any time soon, and that will be a project I'm not looking forward to, seeing if all my VB code and any of my interface customization will still work.

So, my two questions if I upgrade from XP Pro to Windows 7:

1.  Will Mozilla Thunderbird easily replace Outlook Express?

2.  Will I be able to re-install and run Word and Excel 2002 easily? 

MilesAhead

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2009
  • **
  • Posts: 7,173
    • View Profile
    • Miles Ahead Software
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2014, 11:03:31 AM »
I don't know about the Office programs installing.  But I'd say if you have 2+ GB Ram you should run W7 fine.  Thunderbird should be no issue.  In fact I tried updating to the new TB awhile ago.  I saw no need for multi-tab interface.  I returned to the 2.x version as it was essentially the same without the tabbed interface.  TB should just import all your settings and mail folders.

The only annoying thing for me with W7 was the snap stuff.  If the mouse gets near a border while dragging it resizes etc..  But that can be disabled.  The progress bar in taskbar button stuff is great.  You don't have to worry about which window is on top if something is downloading etc..  I find it way more polished than W8.

AndyM

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 616
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2014, 11:06:11 AM »
Thanks!

I guess the smart thing to do would be to install Thunderbird under XP, migrate everything from Outlook Express and get that behind me.

40hz

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2007
  • **
  • Posts: 11,763
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2014, 02:05:46 PM »
Will I be able to re-install and run Word and Excel 2002 easily?

Word and Excel should run fine as long as the Microsoft Live add-in isn't installed. If it is, just remove it and all should be well.

4wd

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 4,410
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2014, 10:48:29 PM »
I just did a data migrate for someone whose computer had died, from XP to Windows 8 - they wanted their emails from OE6 migrated across as well as reinstall of Office 2010 Student Edition (no Outlook).

So I just installed Windows Live Mail (only) from Windows Live Essentials and imported the account and emails, painless.

Person was happy because it was like OE - I'd uninstalled the default Windows 8 email thing so they never had to look at it.

app103

  • That scary taskbar girl
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2006
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,650
    • View Profile
    • App's Apps
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2014, 02:57:51 AM »
I just set up a laptop with Win7 x64, as a first step in migrating away from XP.

There were very few apps I had trouble with, as long as I followed a few rules when installing them.

I created an additional folder for portable & other problem apps. If an app didn't work properly after installing them normally, I uninstalled and tried again by installing them into my extra programs folder. They usually worked well there. There were only a few exceptions, which were easily replaced. (Winzip 9's context menu integration didn't work, Panorama's installer wouldn't run, and latest installer for Opera threw a weird error about not being a valid 7zip archive, and a calculator that I will have to do some extra fussing with to get it to work) I was even able to get Delphi 6 and Paintshop Pro 7 installed and working, and those are 2 apps that have known Vista/Win7 issues.

If you are a bit nervous about Word and Excel 2002, then do the same and create your own extra folder for portable & problem programs, and install it there. My guess is that even the old Office 97 would work ok, if installed this way. (although I'd never do that, for security reasons)

And if you still can't get something to work, then just google the name of the app, version, and "win7" and you'll likely find a guide to installing it so it will work.

If you really like OE, I'd go with Windows Live Mail, as 4wd suggested. It is probably the easiest and most painless migration and will give you the successor to OE, with much less of a learning curve.

And if you like the classic theme in XP, you can have the same in Win7, except that the start menu will be different.

Explorer will take a bit of getting used to, though. No way to have that looking/acting like the one in XP.  :(

Oh, and an extra warning related to installing Win7 on a laptop (mine is a Dell Studio). If you have trouble getting it to boot up, unplug all USB devices until after you have installed all updates, even if you have boot from usb disabled, like I did. I started having troubles after installing SP1 and had to unplug my mouse to get it to finish booting, and one of the later updates that was not included in SP1 resolved it. No more issues.  :)

 
« Last Edit: March 03, 2014, 03:03:40 AM by app103 »

Carol Haynes

  • Waffles for England (patent pending)
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2005
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,985
    • View Profile
    • Dales Computer Services
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2014, 03:53:16 AM »
Windows Live Mail is an easy upgrade from Outlook Express (copy the whole Outlook storage folder and import it) - don't forget the export your address book from OE to a WAB file.

Re. Office apps - the official line is that Office 2003 is the oldest supported version from Windows 7 onwards.

I have seen a couple of Windows 7 systems in a right mess with Office 2000 and Office 97 installed and I would really recommend following MS advice on this. Even Office 2003 has a few minor issues in Windows 7.

If you can't afford an upgrade why not go with free LibreOffice ?

x16wda

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2007
  • **
  • Posts: 671
  • what am I doing in this handbasket?
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2014, 05:27:01 AM »
If you can't afford an upgrade why not go with free LibreOffice ?
+1 for that, and LibreOffice generally does a fine job with the Office 2002 file formats.
vi vi vi - editor of the beast

Stoic Joker

  • Honorary Member
  • Joined in 2008
  • **
  • Posts: 6,266
    • View Profile
    • www.StoicJoker.com
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2014, 07:15:49 AM »
Oh, and an extra warning related to installing Win7 on a laptop (mine is a Dell Studio). If you have trouble getting it to boot up, unplug all USB devices until after you have installed all updates, even if you have boot from usb disabled, like I did. I started having troubles after installing SP1 and had to unplug my mouse to get it to finish booting, and one of the later updates that was not included in SP1 resolved it. No more issues.

I ran into something like that on a (2008 R2) server awhile back. The RDX removable cartridge backup drive was identified as an internally connected USB device, and it would stall/fail the boot if the server was restarted when a cartridge was inserted - eject the cartridge and it booted just fine. This issue had plagued the (then new) client for years. Disable boot from USB was disabled as you mentioned but it would still fail. What I found was that the seemingly completely unrelated Legacy USB Support was the actual culprit, as disabling it resolved the issue.

Steven Avery

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • default avatar
  • Posts: 807
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2014, 07:35:55 AM »
Hi,

Is the concern here the (April?) withdrawal of XP support by Microsoft?  Is that really a problem for a well-layered security system, if you are not some sort of sensitive business enterprise that has to follow auditing directives?

When my Windows 7 had 2 Gb it was slow, it really needed 4. XP does fine on 2 (with a slight preference for the 4 max, not all usable). It seems like a lot of effort to get a new OS and expand the hardware just to maintain the same level of speed.  Would it make more sense to try to get a newer or refurbed Windows 7 (still available?) or 8.  A friend just got a Gateway 8 with 6 GB at some Walmart special in the $200s.  How much is the Windows 7, the memory upgrade (I say its probably necessary) and the time and effort to convert a 6-year old box. Maybe the older box can be converted to a good Linux box instead?

Just some thoughts, since I face a similar situation, my older XP box is a Dell Precision, which is slowly just now decreasing so that the Windows 7 PowerSpec can increase.  The XP box is even tight on space with about 100Gb disk.

Steven

40hz

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2007
  • **
  • Posts: 11,763
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2014, 08:37:05 AM »
If you can't afford an upgrade why not go with free LibreOffice ?
+1 for that, and LibreOffice generally does a fine job with the Office 2002 file formats.

I'll +1 that as well.

And if Libre doesn't fit the bill, there are several other (free or inexpensive) so-called "light" wordprocessors that will work equally well for 90% of all MS Word users. Most have the classic menu (i.e. no ribbon) interface many of us prefer.

app103

  • That scary taskbar girl
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2006
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,650
    • View Profile
    • App's Apps
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2014, 09:02:04 AM »
If you can't afford an upgrade why not go with free LibreOffice ?
+1 for that, and LibreOffice generally does a fine job with the Office 2002 file formats.

I'll +1 that as well.

And if Libre doesn't fit the bill, there are several other (free or inexpensive) so-called "light" wordprocessors that will work equally well for 90% of all MS Word users. Most have the classic menu (i.e. no ribbon) interface many of us prefer.

I would have suggested the same, but ...

and that will be a project I'm not looking forward to, seeing if all my VB code and any of my interface customization will still work.

It ain't all about document formats. There are other compatibility issues, when you are speaking of changing to another app. And some of them may be painful to resolve, especially if you have written a lot of VB code. Which one of the alternatives can you import that to, without having to rewrite it all? Do any of the alternatives support VB?

AndyM

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 616
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2014, 11:05:06 AM »
Wow, I knew this was the right place to ask, thanks everyone!!

Re LibreOffice, App103 expressed my concern, that all the VBA code I've written won't work, or won't work well.  Plus the groups I work with are all standardized on Office.

Sooner or later if I keep working, I'll have to upgrade Excel and Word, but I'm not in a hurry and might have access to a later version of Office in the not too distant future so I'll be able to see for myself.

Windows Live Mail is web-based, no?  I really like having all my email on my machine.  Plus I don't want to get any further tied into the Microsoftverse than I already am.  So I'll probably still check out Thunderbird.

Vurbal

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2012
  • **
  • Posts: 633
  • Mostly harmless
    • View Profile
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2014, 11:17:00 AM »
Windows Live Mail is web-based, no?  I really like having all my email on my machine.  Plus I don't want to get any further tied into the Microsoftverse than I already am.  So I'll probably still check out Thunderbird.

No it's actually part of an add-on pack called Windows Live Essentials which primarily provides software which was available in previous versions but no longer included on the Windows install discs. I don't remember everything that's on it but in addition to the mail client it also includes a photo organizer and Windows Movie Maker.

I don't have the mail client installed but I do use the other 2. Actually I don't really use the photo organizer so much as the improved import wizard it adds.
I learned to say the pledge of allegiance
Before they beat me bloody down at the station
They haven't got a word out of me since
I got a billion years probation
- The MC5

Follow the path of the unsafe, independent thinker. Expose your ideas to the danger of controversy. Speak your mind and fear less the label of ''crackpot'' than the stigma of conformity.
- Thomas J. Watson, Sr

It's not rocket surgery.
- Me


I recommend reading through my Bio before responding to any of my posts. It could save both of us a lot of time and frustration.

app103

  • That scary taskbar girl
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2006
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,650
    • View Profile
    • App's Apps
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #14 on: March 03, 2014, 11:37:31 AM »
Re LibreOffice, App103 expressed my concern, that all the VBA code I've written won't work, or won't work well.  Plus the groups I work with are all standardized on Office.

I am lucky. Most of the people I work with are Mac users and all on Open Office.

4wd

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 4,410
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2014, 05:54:49 PM »
Windows Live Mail is web-based, no?  I really like having all my email on my machine.

As Vurbal said above, Live Mail, (from the Live Essentials pack), is a standalone program as was Outlook Express, you use it the same way, eg. download your emails via POP3 to be stored locally.  It's just a largely updated version of OE.

From Wikipediaw:
Quote
Windows Live Mail (formerly named Windows Live Mail Desktop, code-named Elroy) is a freeware email client from Microsoft. It is the successor to Outlook Express on Windows XP and Windows Mail on Windows Vista. The application is available for download via the Windows Essentials suite.

Windows Live Essentials:
Quote
Programs include Windows Live Messenger, Mail, Writer, Photo Gallery, Family Safety, Toolbar, and Movie Maker, plus Outlook Connector, Office Live Add-in, and Microsoft Silverlight.

Download the web installer and then just select Live Mail, it'll be downloaded and installed.  It'll prompt you to create a Microsoft Live email account when first run, (IIRC), if it doesn't find a program to import from but you can safely cancel those requesters and just import your old emails, accounts, and contacts from wherever you've exported them from OE.

If you used and liked OE, you'll have no problems with Live Mail.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2014, 06:00:10 PM by 4wd »

AndyM

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 616
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #16 on: March 03, 2014, 06:46:49 PM »
Thanks for the clarification re Windows Live Mail.  The question now is whether or not I'd like it better than Thunderbird.  Otherwise I don't want to create any kind of Microsoft account if I don't have to (don't twitter, use facebook, gmail, etc either because I don't have to.)

I like and use Firefox, so I figure I'd probably be ok with Thunderbird.  Are there things about Windows Live Mail that are better?

40hz

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2007
  • **
  • Posts: 11,763
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2014, 07:37:17 PM »
Re LibreOffice, App103 expressed my concern, that all the VBA code I've written won't work, or won't work well.  Plus the groups I work with are all standardized on Office.


Whoops...missed the VBA part. :-[

The answer is: No, VBA code won't work with anything other than MS Office. Sorry for not seeing that earlier. Looks like you're stuck with Microsoft. Not that that's a bad thing. Office is a very capable productivity suite even if it is bloated beyond necessity IMHO.

Something you may want to consider...if you don't mind subscribing versus buying once (until you upgrade), you could look at the Office 365 offering from Microsoft. A $150/yr subscription to Office 365 Small Business Premium or Office 365 Small Business Premium will get you the whole shebang plus a lot more. And the business version will do monthly billing although it will cost $15 per month ($180/yr) instead of $12.50 ($150/yr) if you go that route. Not a bad trade-off if cash flow is tight.

There are some considerations and caveats with Office 365. So be sure to read through what it's about to see if it will work for you.
Microsoft will also give you a free trial (no credit card required) which I strongly suggest you take advantage of before subscribing if you do think it's something you'd be interested in.

Office 365 is not for everybody. But even I have to (reluctantly) admit it makes sense for many people and businesses.

 8)

rgdot

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2009
  • **
  • Posts: 1,859
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2014, 07:53:58 PM »
^ Thanks. Learn something new everyday:

Quote
the five Office 2013 installations you're allowed with your 365 subscription are each fully functioning local installations and they work just fine online or offline

40hz

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2007
  • **
  • Posts: 11,763
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2014, 08:27:03 PM »
^Yup. And IIRC, Office 2013 Home & Business Edition only allows installation on one PC at a time. That was another change that came in with the 2013 editions. Funny how Microsoft didn't feel the need to highlight that little change in their licensing huh? :mrgreen:

4wd

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 4,410
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2014, 12:07:05 AM »
Otherwise I don't want to create any kind of Microsoft account if I don't have to (don't twitter, use facebook, gmail, etc either because I don't have to.)

You don't, you can use any account you like.

Quote
I like and use Firefox, so I figure I'd probably be ok with Thunderbird.  Are there things about Windows Live Mail that are better?

I can't tell you, I use Thunderbird v10 :)

Carol Haynes

  • Waffles for England (patent pending)
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2005
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,985
    • View Profile
    • Dales Computer Services
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2014, 05:11:47 AM »
FWIW Windows Live Mail is easier to deal with if you ever want to change to a different mail client.

Really annoys me that developers write programs that lock you in with no way to export data.

WLM isn't perfect by any means but it has better export functions than most of the others I have tried.

Re. Office I would suggest picking up a copy of MS Office 2003, 2007 or 2010 ASAP. I have Office 2013 on my laptop and it seems to add nothing to 2010 (which I use all the time) except annoyances and product entrapment - most notably their cloud offering (whatever it is called today!!!)

Having said that there is no guarantee that your VBA script will work unmodified in any other version of Office, you may even find that your VBScript in Office 2002 doesn't work properly without modification (assuming you can even get O2002 to run properly on Windows 8 in the first place - which is debatable). Most likely to work with O2003 which does work on Windows 8 - really be surprised if it works with 2007, 2010, 2013 unmodified given that there are major changes in Office products after 2003.

If you do go for a copy of Office 2003 from somewhere note when you activate you need to run at Administrator level (ie. avoid UAC) otherwise the activation gets requested everytime you run the program. Simplest way is post install at the start screen type WINWORD and then right click and run as administrator on the icon.

AndyM

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 616
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2014, 05:24:02 AM »
I could live with Office 2003, I know all my stuff works and there's no ribbon.  I should be able to get a legal copy cheap enough when the time comes.

I'm 99% sure I'll be able to copy my normal.dot and personal.xls from 2002 to 2003.


Quote from: Carol
Haynes link=topic=37413.msg350485#msg350485 date=1393931507
...at the start screen type WINWORD and then right click and run as administrator on the icon.

I'm hoping this sort of thing can be automated.

AndyM

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Posts: 616
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2014, 05:39:22 AM »
Thanks for straightening me out re Windows Live Mail.  It would definitely serve my purpose.

I may get an email address in a system using Office365, which uses Exchange.

Does the info below, from an article somewhere, make this an easy decision, just move to Live Mail so I can more easily manage this email address?

Quote
The main competition to Thunderbird are Microsoft's two email clients, Windows Live Mail and Microsoft Outlook. If you use Exchange, you'll probably need one of these. Windows Live Mail is actually a pretty good client, and has a lot of the same features as Thunderbird, like conversation views, as well as some nice Windows integration. It doesn't have the awesome add-on support that Thunderbird does, however...


Carol Haynes

  • Waffles for England (patent pending)
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2005
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,985
    • View Profile
    • Dales Computer Services
    • Donate to Member
Re: XP to Windows 7 advice
« Reply #24 on: March 04, 2014, 05:40:16 AM »
You only have to do it once to activate the product after that it works fine.