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Author Topic: The Internet Archive presents ....  (Read 8303 times)

4wd

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The Internet Archive presents ....
« on: December 27, 2013, 10:56:38 PM »
Next time Steam suffers a meltdown in the midst of a Flash Sale ... The Console Living Room

Quote
The Internet Archive Console Living Room harkens back to the revolution of the change in the hearth of the home, when the fireplace and later television were transformed by gaming consoles into a center of videogame entertainment. Connected via strange adapters and relying on the television's speaker to put out beeps and boops, these games were resplendent with simple graphics and simpler rules.

The home console market is credited with slowly shifting attention from the arcade craze of the early 1980s and causing arcades to shrink in popularity, leaving a small percentage of what once were many.

Through use of the JSMESS emulator system, which allows direct access to these programs in your browser with no additional plugins or settings, these games can be enjoyed again. Simply click on the screenshot or "Emulate This" button for each individual cartridge, and on modern browsers the games will just start to run. As nostalgia, a teaching tool, or just plain fun, you'll find hundreds of the games that started a billion-dollar industry.

These games are best enjoyed in an up to date version of a modern browser. Currently, there is no sound in the games, although that feature will be added soon. Please read carefully regarding key mappings of the games and programs, to use them in your browser.

app103

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Re: The Internet Archive presents ....
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2013, 12:48:37 PM »
OMG, you have killed my productivity for the day!  >:(

There are some gems in here that you would never have had the chance to play back in the day. For example, Halo 2600, which didn't exist back then!  :o

Tip for anyone trying to play any of the Atari games that originally required a paddle controller. You are not going to be able to do it, since the emulator seems to only have functionality for joystick emulation.  :(

Some of these games I have played so much that I can still hear the sounds in my head while playing them in the emulator.  :D

A few personal favorites:

2600 version of Dark Chambers was a great puzzle game. While the 7800 version had better graphics, the fact you had a more bird's eye view of the layout made it easier to play. You were less likely to get lost in the maze, less likely to end up going in circles, and much easier to figure out where all the items are. That made it much less challenging than the original. I still regret trading my copy of the original for baby sitting services, before having had the chance to really play the 7800 version and find this all out.  :(

Tip: There was a bug, I believe on Level S, that was a game stopper. There was one of the dead ends that you entered but couldn't exit if you had full energy, due to an energy bottle being placed in the doorway, after you entered. Really sucked to make it all the way to that level, get stuck in that room with no monsters to take any of your energy, and not being able to get back out. It meant starting all over again.  :(

Galaga - The whole reason why I bought a 7800. It was just so I could play this game.  :-*

7800 version of Ms Pacman, complete with intermissions.

Tip: Make it past the arrival of Jr, and the layout of board stops changing and just keeps repeating the final layout. Play it enough and you'll figure out the pattern needed to easily clear every board. I stopped playing this when I succeeded in figuring out all the boards.

Midnight Magic - This was so much better than the original Video Pinball. This one actually looked and acted a lot more like a real pinball machine. It was one of my husband's favorites, but he took the game a bit too seriously (broke 2 controllers and a table in fits of rage over losing balls, and was the primary motivator against ever letting him play any sort of pinball game on any of my PCs, out of fear of what kind of abuse my PC and desk might be subjected to). In the emulator, it's actually easier to play with the arrow keys than it was with a joystick. To play it with a joystick and have the same sort of control of the flippers that one would have on a real pinball machine, one had to hold the controller with both thumbs crossed and hooked around the stick, so that when you moved the left thumb against the stick, it controlled the left flipper, and the right thumb for the right flipper. Merely holding the joystick the way one normally would, using one hand to control the direction, really didn't work out very well.

Crystal Castles was always a favorite of mine, but I wouldn't attempt to play it on a PC. It's one of those games best played with an expensive deluxe 8 direction joystick, which 4 arrow keys on a keyboard really can not emulate.  :( The review says the controls were sluggish, even when using a trackball. I never tried it with my trackball, but found that with the 8 direction joystick, it wasn't sluggish at all.  ;)

Stoic Joker

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Re: The Internet Archive presents ....
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2013, 03:02:28 PM »
Okay, I'm going to put this here not so much because it's on this topic per se, but because you got me started on it with this topic.

I came up a generation or two from the original consoles to the Sega Genesis emulator and scared up a copy of the Sonic the Hedgehog ROM ... Which is stuck in demo mode. How the hell do I get the thing to start the game?!? I've been basically palming the keyboard for the last half an hour.

4wd

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Re: The Internet Archive presents ....
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2013, 08:15:45 PM »
OMG, you have killed my productivity for the day!  >:(

Glad I could help  ;D

TaoPhoenix

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Re: The Internet Archive presents ....
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2013, 10:15:59 PM »
Okay, I'm going to put this here not so much because it's on this topic per se, but because you got me started on it with this topic.

I came up a generation or two from the original consoles to the Sega Genesis emulator and scared up a copy of the Sonic the Hedgehog ROM ... Which is stuck in demo mode. How the hell do I get the thing to start the game?!? I've been basically palming the keyboard for the last half an hour.

For me on the "Gens" emulator, try doing stuff with the Enter key. I know, sounds simple, but it seems to be working for the moment. But I almost remember it not working ... so then try the way I found it first, Control-Enter!

Stoic Joker

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Re: The Internet Archive presents ....
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2013, 10:32:59 AM »
Okay, I'm going to put this here not so much because it's on this topic per se, but because you got me started on it with this topic.

I came up a generation or two from the original consoles to the Sega Genesis emulator and scared up a copy of the Sonic the Hedgehog ROM ... Which is stuck in demo mode. How the hell do I get the thing to start the game?!? I've been basically palming the keyboard for the last half an hour.

For me on the "Gens" emulator, try doing stuff with the Enter key. I know, sounds simple, but it seems to be working for the moment. But I almost remember it not working ... so then try the way I found it first, Control-Enter!

Now wouldn't you just know I tried everything else first... Thanks man!

Apparently the catch was that you have to hit it while the Sega logo is still being displayed. So it's sort of a slow double tap if the demo has already started.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2013, 10:50:02 AM by Stoic Joker »

IainB

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The Internet Archive presents ... The Internet Arcade!
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2014, 02:42:58 PM »
I was just browsing The Internet Arcade. Impressive. Well worth a look.
Also see Internet Archive offers 900 classic arcade games for browser-based play | Ars Technica
The below quote (relevant) is from DCF "silly humour" section:
I just saw the news story that the Internet Archive and some other people just released a browser based "Internet Arcade" of old classic games.  Leaving aside the copyright licensing / abandonware stuff,
...

But that's the big question here.  HOW did they get license to so many of these?  I mean, it doesn't just play in the browser, you can download the ROM!  Last I checked, it was *ahem* technically illegal to own a ROM except under certain conditions.  I mean, are they just throwing it up there in hopes that MOST of them stick?  Or is this a short-lived experiment in "let's take bets as to how long it'll take before the first DMCA takedown notice gets delivered"?

Either way: So... many... games...

Well, trying not to cut myself shaving with Occam's razor, here's a collation a few of the theories floating from the Slashdot thread mixed with my own:

1. It's hosted by the Internet Archive, and not just any ol' Pop & Son outfit who can be scared with a couple of nasty letters. So let's say a big X % of these games are not under license, but through a few corporate layers, there's enough money behind archive.org that other revenue they generate more than outweighs "abuses" like this. For part of this theory, someone pointed out that computer games are much different than most other forms of copyrighted works - classic songs and TV and movies can retain their basic value for a very long time. But with the march of time, nostalgia aside, no one would play these games except for novelty value.

2. Another idea is some kind of "copyright insurance" - suppose they get a silent insurer to switch the burden of copyright chain onto the final record holders rather than themselves. Think of it as a kind of big poker bluff: "Okay, let's just grant the silly notion that a copyrighted work is $300,000 each. But think of the insane prices lawyers charge. Do you *really* want to try to figure out whatever became of Tago Electronics to win your settlement for the game Anteater? After you get done cheering at happy hour, what have you accomplished? Fine. Take one down, pass it around, 899 games left on the wall."

 3. Maybe they somehow used their big money to do some kind of massive bulk purchase saying, "Okay, with a clause that covers subsequent rights owners and flow through, most of these games came from the same twelve companies. So, here's a big chunk of money, because our petty cash numbers in six figures. So can we have these games now?"

The unifying theme is that unlike a Pop & Son team hoping to skate under the radar, archive.org shouldn't be able to just announce a colossal sonic cannon shot like this, looking like it risks copyright armageddon, without some kind of awesome hidden cards in their hand. I just don't know what those are.

TaoPhoenix

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Re: The Internet Archive presents ....
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2014, 05:11:41 PM »
Super quick playability notes:

1. I have some strange problems between PaleMoon and Firefox. Basically, stuff seems to load in Firefox and not (my copy of) PaleMoon. It's unknown what version control and add-ons have to do with any of that.

2. In Firefox, the few programs I tried seem to mostly behave at regular speeds. I haven't tried changing screen sizes much yet.

3. My machine was decent for its time, but a lot of these programs do def begin to max out my cpu.

4. Sound barely works on any of these games for me for reasons unknown.

5. Ataxx doesn't seem to be available! : ((   
(But I do have the MAME version. I still play it once every five years.)

More rights musings:

I'm not sure how deep the connection was/is between Internet Archive and MAME. I used to believe MAME was "just a bunch of people doing that", and they always had medium stern warnings about the roms (which of course we took liberally!)

This time around, they have a thundering quote on their webpage that says "we're exercising our right to forget" and the mysterious phrase "The site's new arcade offerings are the work of curator Jason Scott, who has previously archived thousands of classic console and PC games as part of the Internet Archive's software collection." from the Ars Technica article.

That last phrase is one that leads me to my earlier musings, and that both might be right - that it did used to "just be people" say back in 2004, but that something changed behind the scenes that's now different.


« Last Edit: November 05, 2014, 05:16:44 PM by TaoPhoenix »