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Author Topic: Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article  (Read 5750 times)

mouser

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Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article
« on: May 12, 2006, 11:10:24 PM »
Quote
Indie Game Devs: ‘Forget It’
Developers tell aspiring game makers the ugly truth.
May 10, 2006
A panel of independent developers delivered a sobering reality check to aspiring game creators at the E3 expo in Los Angeles on Wednesday, warning those who harbor dreams of producing a game with a small team and reaping hundreds of millions of dollars from a big deal with Electronic Arts.
“You have a zero percent chance of success,” said Warren Spector, a game industry veteran and the current president of Junction Point Studios, a company that develops games for consoles and PCs. “The barrier to entry in terms of cost, quality required, access to a market… forget it.”



from slashdot

Edvard

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Re: Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2006, 10:21:32 AM »
But... what about http://indiegamedev.tucows.com/
and the "Scratchware Manifesto" http://indiegamedev....005/1/14/243722.html

mouser

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Re: Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2006, 10:32:41 AM »
nice find, edvard - though it doesn't look like the site has been updated since october 2005.

Edvard

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Re: Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2006, 03:41:07 PM »
hehe- that would explain a few things...

Gothi[c]

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Re: Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2006, 03:52:41 PM »
The game industry is in a rather depressing state.
Companies like EA are buying up all the smaller (successful) ones, and games are much like the movie industry, where everything done for maximum marketing value and popularity with the masses.

EA: All your games are belong to us.

These larger companies can not afford to make unpopular games so there may be a small market there for indy developers who aren't aiming for the general public.

Most indy game developers stick to puzzle games or kids games.

Edvard

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Re: Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2006, 03:58:47 PM »
Indie game devs: somebody set up us the bomb!

JavaJones

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Re: Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2006, 11:14:47 PM »
Yeah the game industry is in an ugly state, no doubt. But I find Spector's comments a bit needlessly discouraging and depressing. Sure if the goal is "to make millions of dollars" then you're barking up the wrong tree. But you *can* be successful with frugal business practices, good management, and a genuinely good idea. Oh, and not having your expectations sky high! Start with "I'd like to make a living" and then work from there up to Ferrari. ;) It really does work, I've seen it happen, it's possible. Just don't expect to be bought by EA - hell, thank your lucky stars if you're not. EA is evil. :P

- Oshyan

mouser

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Re: Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2006, 11:23:47 PM »
wise advice javajones, and i agree.

JavaJones

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Re: Indie Game Devs: Forget It - article
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2006, 12:59:50 AM »
I find this kind of attitude permeates a lot of areas actually, especially in media. People are hanging on to old publishing models in particular. Music, books, games, even movies, all of them can be published and distributed by individuals these days for a reasonable cost (or even no money up-front - witness on-demand product customization like CafePress). It seems like people's outlandish goals and the stars in their eyes are often what stand most in their way. Musicians who are just hoping for that record contract that will surely propel them to stardom; authors who dream of being on the New York Times best seller's list; software and game developers who want to be the next Microsoft or EA, or at least get bought out by them. These are people who either A: have money on the brain and thus likely don't have the inherent love of what they do to really succeed in the long haul or B: do have that passion but have been conditioned to believe that traditional avenues of success are the only viable ones, or at least the only attractive ones.

What's really funny is, take celebrities as an example, a lot of them have serious problems! Musicians that make it big often seem to be worse-off emotionally than when they were small. You lose a lot in the transition from simple artist to super star, no matter what media you work in. A big part of that is the connection to your fans, users, clients, etc. And that connection can be one of the most powerful motivating and legitimizing forces possible. You can earn all the money in the world but if you're a real creator at heart it won't mean much unless you can really see that what you're doing is being legitimately appreciated and utilized. So you have to laugh - the success so many people seek can also be a very damaging and unhealthy thing.

Ok, I know all this sounds like an overly fluffy, impractical tirade. But people are out there every day proving that these alternative models work. Meanwhile every day you hear about a new hollywood meltdown/drug overdose/etc. Every week you can read a new story about how EA screwed over some up-and-coming dev house or one of their employees. Every month we see new pop superstars rise and fall. Having watched a favorite band climb that ladder to "success" and then fall slowly down it, I have seen how painful and damaging that can be. I can't help but think that if the climb hadn't been made in the first place, or if it had been made on more personal terms, things would be better off. I don't mean to suggest that the band would be better off had they not succeeded, I am talking more in terms of scale here. The lead singer has a 3 million dollar apartment in New York, but he's so depressed he hardly wants to leave his house. Whether his success contributed to that or not, it is at least obvious it didn't help! Plus their music was better before they went "big time". ;)

So to all the aspiring creatives out there, remember that it is what you create and people's appreciation of it that matters. Find your venues and outlets and nurture them, support them with your creations. Remember that money is just a means to an end, not an end in itself. Ask for the compensation you really need and if what you are doing is good, you just might get it, or at least start to. You will have to work hard, but it will be honest work, and it should be work that you love.

Ok, rant over. ;)

- Oshyan
« Last Edit: May 23, 2006, 01:03:05 AM by JavaJones »