ATTENTION: You are viewing a page formatted for mobile devices; to view the full web page, click HERE.

Main Area and Open Discussion > Living Room

Interesting "stuff"

<< < (231/399) > >>

Arizona Hot:


Passive Wi-Fi - YouTube

'Passive Wi-Fi' researchers promise to cut Wi-Fi power by 10,000x  Macworld

But is it passive-aggressive?

Interesting "stuff"

Microsoft’s Xamarin acquisition opens door to truly universal Windows apps

It can't be truly universal until it runs in your brain. How would you like to have Microsoft in your head?  If it was truly universal, you could blame Microsoft for the weather.

Arizona Hot:
Interesting "stuff"

Remix OS beta Install Android variant on any PC and Mac  ZDNet

A Google researcher has been reporting severe vulnerabilities in security suites from Kaspersky, Trend Micro, MalwareBytes, FireEye, AVG, ESET and now Comodo.
--- End quote ---

Research shows antivirus products vulnerable to attack  ZDNet

Arizona Hot:


Super Heavy Tanks Drifting and Shooting in Snow M1A1 Abrams and Leopard 2 Tanks in Action - YouTube

Interesting "stuff"

3 other hacks FBI could use on killer's iPhone besides an Apple key

Arizona Hot:
Interesting "stuff"

Apple releases fix for '1970-bricked' iPhones with new beta update

Interesting "stuff"

​Why Microsoft's Xamarin purchase is a blunder

Arizona Hot:
For increased security, some banks, such as Bank of America and Chase even offer dual factor authentication by which when you enter your user name and password to access your account, a random password is sent to your smartphone that must be used to gain access your account.  This seems like it would be foolproof, but never underestimate the power of a fool.

Scammers are now calling their victim’s mobile service providers posing as their victim and telling the provider that their victim’s phone has been damaged, lost or replaced and that they need to reactivate their mobile number to a new SIM card in a phone controlled by the criminal.

A SIM card is an integrated circuit that stores information used to authenticate subscribers on smartphones.  Once the SIM cards have been swapped, when the criminal uses the already stolen user name and password to begin the access to the victim’s account, when the bank sends the one time password to access the account, it is sent to the new SIM card in the phone of the criminal.  Better use of security questions before service providers will change SIM cards can help to reduce this risk.

Online banking on your computer or smartphone can be safe if you take the right precautions.  As with so many things, the best place to find a helping hand is at the end of your own arm.
--- End quote ---

E-banking tip: Mom's maiden name? Say 'grapefruit'

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version