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Author Topic: US General Speaks at Black Hat 2013 - Heckled  (Read 510 times)

Renegade

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US General Speaks at Black Hat 2013 - Heckled
« on: August 01, 2013, 08:02:49 PM »
I guess my only surprise at this story is that it's so tame:

http://news.cnet.com...stitution/?ttag=fbwp

Quote
Hackers to NSA chief: Read the Constitution

The head of the NSA faces a tough audience as he appeals to hackers and security professionals at Black Hat 2013 to help the U.S. government build better spying tools.

And despite trying to avoid the obvious by organizing prepared questions:

Quote
Alexander returned repeatedly to the question of how to balance security vs. civil liberties and privacy. But when it came time for the question-and-answer session, he faced more heckling and skepticism.

The questions had been prepared in advance via a questionnaire organized by Black Hat's new general manager, Trey Ford, who read the questions from the stage. But first, an audience member shouted out a question to the general.

"Why do so many countries want to attack us?" the person asked.
The general replied that America stands in the way of them reaching their objective, which is to force everybody to comply with sharia law.

"They want to attack us because we're bombing them!" shouted another person, to much chuckling from the audience.

But, it sounds like the general did a decent job of damage control. Well, as reported by CNET anyways.
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