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Last post Author Topic: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.  (Read 146270 times)

40hz

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #500 on: January 18, 2014, 02:52:22 AM »
I read in the US news media in my feed-reader today that Obama has made announcements as to how the NSA problem is going to be fixed.
Phew! That's a relief.    :Thmbsup:

Unfortunately, nothing short of an "American Spring" is gonna accomplish that.  :-\

Renegade

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #501 on: January 18, 2014, 05:08:25 AM »
I read in the US news media in my feed-reader today that Obama has made announcements as to how the NSA problem is going to be fixed.
Phew! That's a relief.    :Thmbsup:

Unfortunately, nothing short of an "American Spring" is gonna accomplish that.  :-\

Sure you didn't mean to say "American Fall"? :P
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Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

IainB

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #502 on: January 18, 2014, 07:35:24 AM »
Some people (not me, you understand) might suggest that the correct term could probably be "Nuclear Winter", but I couldn't possibly comment.

wraith808

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #503 on: January 18, 2014, 04:35:48 PM »
Bad Form.  Especially considering how bad things are right now on those fronts, and how much people tend to ignore that fact.

Bad form.

tomos

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #504 on: January 18, 2014, 04:46:11 PM »
... meanwhile in the EU, the backlash seems to have subsided to a token lip service.
Tom

40hz

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #505 on: January 18, 2014, 05:36:54 PM »
... meanwhile in the EU, the backlash seems to have subsided to a token lip service.

Despite all the high-minded talk, the EU is just as guilty of being seduced by this technology as the United States was.

As Gandalf said to the Council of Elrond in The Fellowship of the Ring:

sarumantir.jpg

“It is perilous to study too deeply the arts of the Enemy, for good or for ill.”


wraith808

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IainB

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wraith808

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #509 on: January 30, 2014, 10:22:25 AM »
There's no post... only the video that you've embedded when I go to that first link.

Stoic Joker

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #510 on: January 30, 2014, 12:44:37 PM »
I think he meant the Big-Brother section the video was from. *Shrug*


HOLY WTF!!!!!!!
Authorities Want Remote Access To Californians’ Home CCTV Footage ‘For The Greater Good’

I shouldn't be reading this stuff ... I'm going to end up with health issues.

40hz

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #511 on: January 30, 2014, 01:05:54 PM »
I think he meant the Big-Brother section the video was from. *Shrug*


HOLY WTF!!!!!!!
Authorities Want Remote Access To Californians’ Home CCTV Footage ‘For The Greater Good’

I shouldn't be reading this stuff ... I'm going to end up with health issues.

The New Miranda

"You have the right to know you no longer have any rights. Any technology you install and pay for will be used against you in a court of law. Or anywhere else it can cause humiliation, pain and grief for you if somebody in government is having a particularly bad day...or just didn't like 'your attitude.'"
 :-\

Stoic Joker

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #512 on: January 31, 2014, 06:52:58 AM »
...And it still doesn't make you as an individual any safer - response times are what response times are - it just makes the cops investigation shorter because they already got to watch you get murdered on "live" TV.

IainB

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #513 on: January 31, 2014, 07:39:50 AM »
There's no post... only the video that you've embedded when I go to that first link.
That's odd. I suppose I could be mistaken, but I was sure there was some text - I couldn't be bothered copying it. Maybe the post text has been removed, or maybe it's now been put behind the paywall?

IainB

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #514 on: February 04, 2014, 04:23:52 AM »
A relevant quote from an environmentalist:
“Freedom begins between the ears.” — Edward Abbey.

IainB

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #515 on: February 07, 2014, 12:45:29 AM »
The Turkish parliament is reported as having just passed a fairly oppressive set of new Internet online censorship laws and penalties.
I have been interested in the developments over the years as Turkey seemed to start a reversion/return to its old ways and religio-political non-secular (Islamic) ideology and corresponding restrictions of freedom, which probably won't help its already not inconsiderable efforts to gain accession to the EU as a full member state.

However, post SnowdenGate revelations (of US NSA and UK GCHQ wholesale surveillance, coupled with the NZ DCSB role in this and the Dotcom fiasco), I did wonder whether the so-called "Western" nations hadn't effectively been demonstrating themselves as being amongst the most de facto fascistic, oppressive and least free countries on the planet. Similar thoughts would seem to be implied in this interesting take by Techdirt on Turkey's Internet clampdown.
(Copied below sans embedded hyperlinks/images.)
Quote
Turkey Passes New Net Censorship And Surveillance Laws; West No Longer In A Position To Criticize
from the awkward dept

Last week we discussed the Turkish government's bizarre campaign about the supposed "problems" of online freedom. Maybe this was an attempt to blunt criticism of its new online censorship law, which has just been passed by the Turkish parliament, as the Wall Street Journal reports:

   The law, which must be approved by President Abdullah Gul to take effect, will allow the Presidency of Telecommunication and Communication, or TIB, to block access to Internet sites within four hours of receiving complaints about privacy violations. Turkey's web hosts will also have to store all traffic information for up to two years, according to the measure adopted as part of a legislative package.

That is, not only does it bring in harsh and swift online censorship, but requires online surveillance too. As the Guardian points out, this makes a bad situation worse:

   Censorship and a very tight control of the internet are already a reality in Turkey. According to Engelliweb.com, around 40,500 websites were blocked in Turkey by the beginning of February -- 10,000 more than in April last year. The latest Freedom of the Net report published by Freedom House describes the Turkish internet as "partially free".

Despite that, Turkey's deputy prime minister, Bülent Ar?nç, is quoted as saying:

   "We are freer and have more press freedom than many other countries in the world," he said.

The sad thing is, he may be right. Now that Western countries have lost the moral high ground when it comes to censoring Web sites and carrying out blanket surveillance, others plainly feel they have a free hand to bring in even more repressive laws clamping down on Internet freedom. Turkey's move is just the latest in a growing series.

IainB

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #516 on: February 07, 2014, 01:10:57 AM »
And as if to substantiate the point...
(Copied below sans embedded hyperlinks/images.)
Quote
How The Copyright Industry Made Your Computer Less Safe
from the welcome-to-the-world-of-drm dept
I've already written one piece about Cory Doctorow's incredible column at the Guardian concerning digital rights management and anti-circumvention, in which I focused on how the combination of DRM and anti-circumvention laws allows companies to make up their own copyright laws in a way that removes the rights of the public. Those rights are fairly important, and the reason we have them encoded within our copyright laws is to make sure that copyright isn't abused to stifle speech. But, anti-circumvention laws combined with DRM allow the industry to route around that entirely.

But there's a second important point in Doctorow's piece that is equally worth highlighting, and it's that the combination of DRM and anti-circumvention laws make all of our computers less safe. For this to make sense, you need to understand that DRM is really a form of security software.

  • The entertainment industry calls DRM "security" software, because it makes them secure from their customers. Security is not a matter of abstract absolutes, it requires a context. You can't be "secure," generally -- you can only be secure from some risk. For example, having food makes you secure from hunger, but puts you at risk from obesity-related illness.

  • DRM is designed on the presumption that users don't want it, and if they could turn it off, they would. You only need DRM to stop users from doing things they're trying to do and want to do. If the thing the DRM restricts is something no one wants to do anyway, you don't need the DRM. You don't need a lock on a door that no one ever wants to open.

  • DRM assumes that the computer's owner is its adversary.


But, to understand security, you have to recognize that it's an ever-evolving situation. Doctorow quotes Bruce Schneier in pointing out that security is a process, not a product. Another way of thinking about it is that you're only secure until you're not -- and that point is going to come eventually. As Doctorow notes, every security system relies on people probing it and finding and reporting new vulnerabilities. That allows the process of security to keep moving forward. As vulnerabilities are found and understood, new defenses can be built and the security gets better. But anti-circumvention laws make that almost impossible with DRM, meaning that the process of making security better stops -- while the process of breaking it doesn't.

  • Here is where DRM and your security work at cross-purposes. The DMCA's injunction against publishing weaknesses in DRM means that its vulnerabilities remain unpatched for longer than in comparable systems that are not covered by the DMCA. That means that any system with DRM will on average be more dangerous for its users than one without DRM.


And that leads to very real vulnerabilities. The most famous, of course, is the case of the Sony rootkit. As Doctorow notes, multiple security companies were aware of the nefarious nature of that rootkit, which not only hid itself on your computer and was difficult to delete, but also opened up a massive vulnerability for malware to piggyback on -- something malware writers took advantage of. And yet, the security companies did nothing, because explaining how to remove the rootkit would violate the DMCA.

Given the post-Snowden world we live in today, people are suddenly taking computer security and privacy more seriously than they have in the past -- and that, as Doctorow notes, represents another opportunity to start rethinking the ridiculousness of anti-circumvention laws combined with DRM. Unfortunately, politicians who are way behind on this stuff still don't get it. Recent trade agreements like the TPP and ACTA continue to push anti-circumvention clauses, and require them around the globe, thereby weakening computer security.

This isn't just an issue for the "usual copyright people." This is about actually making sure the computers we use are as secure and safe as they can be. Yet, in a world with anti-circumvention provisions, that's just not possible. It's time to fix that.

Some people (not me you understand), might say that through **AA-driven DRM, SOPA/PIPA and NSA surveillance, the US Corporatist-led government has been and still is deliberately facilitating a prolonged and hugely successful pincer move on Internet freedom and privacy, making a hypocritical travesty of the American Constitution in the process, but I couldn't possibly comment.

IainB

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The Internet and the defenestration of the gatekeepers
« Reply #517 on: February 09, 2014, 05:25:04 PM »
Very thought-provoking post from Quotulatiousness.ca:
(Copied below sans embedded hyperlinks/images.)
Quote
The Internet and the defenestration of the gatekeepers
February 5, 2014
Filed under: Government, Liberty, Technology — Tags: EdwardSnowden, Internet, Propaganda — Nicholas Russon @ 08:51

In the latest Libertarian Enterprise, L. Neil Smith talks about the recent movie The Fifth Estate, prominent whistleblowers, and how the Internet upset so many top-down information models:

    The top three “whistle-blowers”, of course, in no particular order, are Assange himself, Bradley/Chelsea Manning, and Edward Snowden. I’m interested in these individuals for a number of reasons, not the least of which, is that I wrote about them (actually, I anticipated them) long before most people in the world ever knew they existed.

    Including me.

    Eleven years ago, in a speech I delivered to the Libertarian Party of New Mexico entitled “Empire of Lies“, I asserted that every human being on Earth is swimming — drowning — in an ocean of lies, mostly told by governments of one variety or another. I pointed out that lies of that kind — for example, the Gulf of Tonkin “incident” that never happened, and yet cost the lives of 60,000 Americans and 2,000,000 Vietnamese — are deadly. I proposed, therefore, that any politician, bureaucrat, or policeman caught telling a lie to any member of the public for any reason — a well as any among their ilk keeping secrets — ought to be subject to capital punishment, preferably by public hanging.

    On network television.

    Some time later, I stumbled on what I think is the true historical significance of the Internet. For as long as human beings have been communicating with one another, except among family and friends (and even then, sometimes) communications have been vertical and one-way, from the top down. Just to take it back to the Middle Ages, you can’t talk back to, or argue with a church bell. You either do what you are trained to do when it rings — wake, pray, eat, go to bed — or you do not, and suffer whatever consequences society has arranged for you to suffer.

    This sorry situation was not improved materially by later “great” inventions like the printing press, movies, radio, or television. Such innovations only made it easier and more convenient to issue orders. The elite laid down the law to the peons (that’s us) and there was no way of contradicting them. Letters to the Editor are limited to 400 words.

    But the Internet, and all of the technical, political, and social phenomena associated with it, turned this communications hierarchy sideways. Almost overnight, it was now possible for anybody on the planet to talk to anybody else, and to speak privately with a single individual, or to millions, without obtaining anyone’s permission, judged not by their power or authority, but by the cogency of their arguments.

    Atlas didn’t shrug, Authority wigged.

    Traditional Big Media, newspaper, magazine, and book publishers, movie studios, radio and television network executives, held onto their monopoly gatekeeper position, inherited from a more primitive era, desperately and at any cost. Only they were fit to judge what word could be sent by mere individuals to the Great Unwashed (that’s us, again). What it cost them is their very existence. They were incapable of divining that the Age of Authority, including theirs, was over.

    For governments all over the world, subsisting as they all do on lies, intimidation, and violence, it was a nightmare. They have tried to fight back, but they will lose. The tide of history is against them. The idea of “peer-to-peer” communication is out there, and — short of the mass slaughter some of them seem to be preparing against us: a measure of their utter despair — it can never be called back or contained.

40hz

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #518 on: February 09, 2014, 07:38:25 PM »
Awesome! :Thmbsup: (both for the argument and use of the word 'defenestration') 8)

I think the analysis is spot on even if I'm not sufficiently sanguine as to agree about the inevitability of his conclusion.

IainB

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #519 on: February 09, 2014, 09:28:02 PM »
Awesome! :Thmbsup: (both for the argument and use of the word 'defenestration') 8)
I think the analysis is spot on even if I'm not sufficiently sanguine as to agree about the inevitability of his conclusion.
Some people (not me, you understand) might say that defenestration would be too good for some of these "gatekeepers" and their ilk, and that being put on the rack and then being hung, drawn and quartered would be more fitting for their oppressive crimes, but I couldn't possibly comment.

I'm none too sanguine about the outcome either.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2014, 07:03:45 PM by IainB, Reason: Minor correction. »

IainB

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #520 on: February 12, 2014, 04:58:23 AM »
Just read this post at easydns.org. I don't know if it is alarmist, but it seems pretty serious.
(Copied below sans embedded hyperlinks/images.)
Quote
YOU have a moral obligation to use crypto.
Written by Mark Jeftovic on February 11, 2014 — 5 Comments

Image: we_want_you_to_use_crypto

Today is The Day We Fight Back, a global initiative to send a message to our overlords that we're not thrilled about being spied on, subject to mass surveillance and basically living in an Orwellian nightmare.

Ordinarily we're not big "joiners" or "petition pushers", we think taking action has more efficacy. However, this is in it's own way doing just that. It is simply unfathomable to me how low on people's radar this issue is.

When the first revelations began surfacing that the NSA had basically implemented a surveillance state, I commented privately "just wait, eventually it will come out that Canada is doing the same thing".

Sure enough, reports started to surface about CSEC's activities, first engaging in industrial espionage against trading partners and then more recently, setting up wifi honeypots in Canadian airports to track Canadian citizens.

What surprised me was the lack of reaction from the populace here about this latest revelation. Trust me: this isn't just about an experiment in an airport tracking metadata, it's just the tip of the iceberg.

A lot of people like using us because we're not in the USA, and some of the rationalizations behind that perceived benefit still hold true: somewhat saner copyright laws (at least for the moment), not being wimps when it comes to idiotic takedown requests, et al.

But the idea that we are somehow "out of reach of the NSA" is definitely not one of them. Sure, we're not actively collaborating with them, as many US businesses are, but as we've said before: we just assume the pipes going into and out of our major network exchange points are being vacuumed en masse.

That's why we recently rolled out GPG encrypted email forwarding and will soon make it available on easyMail where it can encrypt your IMAP mailboxes. It's why we're going to spin out a personal privacy appliance fairly soon.

Because signing petitions is all well and good,  the anarcho-libertarian in me (not speaking for the entire company, or then again maybe I am) suspects that the political system we live under here in the "the Globalized World Order" is more or less bankrupt, corrupt and has lost all legitimacy to rule. It doesn't matter if next election one political party says "we're going to conduct a review of our intelligence agencies" and the other one says "we'll have a full public inquiry!". That's not a choice. There hasn't been real choice in the political menu in decades. So citizens can scream as loud as they want that "this is wrong!", it isn't going to sway our overlords from the current path.

That's why it's up to all of us to do it ourselves: start using crypto, take a look at things like bitcoin. Become hard to surveil, not because you're "doing nothing wrong", but because the government is.
________________________

I don't know that "Today is The Day We Fight Back" though. It looks rather like it was a non-event.
Maybe there's little appetite left to fight the Monster State.

IainB

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #521 on: February 27, 2014, 04:44:28 AM »
Guido Fawkes puts it in an amusing wrapper, as usual, but this seems quite serious. I hadn't realised that GCHQ/NSA were apparently so amazingly up to their armpits in deliberately fomenting revolution/war in targetted nations using so many tech + psych. skills.
Secret GCHQ Plan to Annoy Guido

tomos

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #522 on: February 27, 2014, 05:11:12 AM »
I hadn't realised that GCHQ/NSA were apparently so amazingly up to their armpits in deliberately fomenting revolution/war [...]

this is not directly related to the linked presentation (? - it may be implied, but not clearly - although I would have been happier if the images were bigger, i.e. I may have missed something).

And I'm not saying they're not - and you may even have posted before here about it - but if you're going to throw out a statement that bald, it needs/deserves a reference/link.
Tom

TaoPhoenix

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #523 on: February 27, 2014, 06:44:36 AM »
...

I don't know that "Today is The Day We Fight Back" though. It looks rather like it was a non-event.
Maybe there's little appetite left to fight the Monster State.

Yep. Some random day two weeks ago.


Stoic Joker

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Re: Knight to queen's bishop 3 - Snowden charged with espionage.
« Reply #524 on: February 27, 2014, 06:46:33 AM »
although I would have been happier if the images were bigger

Bottom right button of player makes it full screen - I couldn't see them before that either. ;)