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Last post Author Topic: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread  (Read 15686 times)

mouser

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #50 on: April 11, 2014, 04:20:38 AM »
I posted my blue cheese ranch dressing recipe earlier.
Now I'm going to tell you about the salad i've been making and eating lately, which i use the dressing on:

First, I make large batches of the basic salad and store in zip lock bags which i eat over the course of a week:
  • 1 part Iceberg lettuce
  • 2 part red romaine or red leaf lettuce
  • 1 part spinach
  • some red cabbage
  • lots of shredded radishes
  • a little shredded carrot
  • lots of chickpeas (garbanzo beans; canned)
  • Red and orange peppers, diced

Now here's the part you may think sounds disgusting, but is delicious:
  • Fill a smallish (cereal bowl size?) bowl with cubed/pressed tofu and sliced mushrooms
  • Coat tofu and mushrooms lightly in soy sauce
  • Add a big handfull of grated cheddar cheese
  • Stir to mix.
  • Microwave for 5 minutes until cheese melts
  • Mix the tofu/mushroom/cheese into the salad.

Delicious!

Renegade

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #51 on: April 13, 2014, 09:20:42 AM »
Renegade's KICK ASS COFFEE!!! (and hangover cure)

  • Have trouble waking up?
  • Lacking energy during the day?
  • Need a serious pick-me-up?
  • Want to blast your mental powers beyond psychic into Akira-land?
  • Want to feel like Superman on steroid?

THIS is your Huckleberry! :D

INGREDIENTS:

  • Espresso coffee - turkish ground (super fine ground)
  • Malt extract
  • Milk/cream

1) Make your coffee
2) Use 1 large swirled spoon of malt extract as your sweetener instead of sugar (artificial sweeteners are toxic)
3) Add milk to taste

The malt extract will give you a super-boost. Seriously. It's mind-blowing just how wild it is. It does have a flavour (a very nice one at that!), but you can decide to love it and the uber-rush you get (it lasts - it's not a short buzz - it's lasting, real energy provided by vitamins & nutrients).

Also... the malt extract will seriously help destroy/mitigate any hangover you have.

Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

Renegade

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #52 on: July 10, 2014, 10:50:55 PM »
Hmm... Not many people sharing recipes lately... Guess I'll need to kickstart this thread again... with BOOZE~!

Renegade's Alcoholic Ginger Ale!

Brewing booze at home is dirt simple. Here's a recipe for alcoholic ginger ale that you can experiment with, and that uses no special ingredients or equipment beyond what you probably already have at home.

Ingredients:

  • Ginger - 50 g per litre of water for a strong flavour - reduce to about 15 g per litre of water for a mild ginger flavour
  • Flip-top bottles - e.g. Grolsch bottles, or in a pinch you can use regular plastic soda bottles
  • Yeast - you can use plain old baker's yeast, though specialised yeasts like champagne yeast will work better
  • Sugar - Lots. 50~100 g per litre of water to start. More later... Try to use caster sugar (icing sugar) if you can, but this isn't crucial.
  • Lemon juice - 1 lemon per 5 L is fine
  • Cheesecloth - you can use a regular J-cloth as well if you don't have any cheesecloth or muslin, though it's probably a good idea to boil that first
  • Filtered water - However much end product you want to have, use that much water

Step 1 - Ginger slurry (or chop)

Put your ginger into a food processor and liquify it. Add in some water to help. This will depend on your food processor.

If you don't have a food processor, just chop it up finely.

The finer the ginger, the stronger the flavour. So, you can use less ginger and create a slurry, or use more ginger and just chop it. Given the high prices of ginger here, I create a slurry. Again, adjust the amount of ginger for your own tastes. 50 g per litre of water in a slurry is extremely strong.

Step 2 - Syrup

Put your ginger slurry into a pot & add the lemon juice, some water and sugar (see above for ratios). Use all the sugar, but don't add all the water. You only need enough water to dissolve the sugar. Heat the pot hot enough to dissolve the sugar. It doesn't need to boil, and it's better if you don't boil the ginger.

When the sugar has dissolved, remove it from the heat and allow it to cool to room temperature (IMPORTANT). You can add cool water to hasten this, but some sugar may precipitate - not a big deal, but it's better to have it dissolved.

Step 3 - Strain the syrup

Strain the syrup into a large container/bowl. Use cheesecloth or something fine to get out as much of the particulate ginger as possible. You will still have some cloudiness though, which is fine. You may need to strain it more than once if you have a slurry. (Your tolerance for sediment is what's important here.)

Step 4 - Add yeast

Add water to your syrup to make sure it is room temperature. Add 1 teaspoon of yeast per litre of water. (How much water you add here isn't very important - add as much as the container will hold.) Stir the mixture.

Step 5 - First bottling step

Pour what you have into bottles equally. e.g. Pour until all your bottles are equally x% full. Top off the bottles with water, but make sure to leave a good amount of room at the top! 75% full is fine if you're planning on making it strong & going through step 6 more than 2x. Do NOT fill the bottles - they will explode.

Cover the tops of the bottles with cheesecloth (or anything similar) and leave it for a day...

Step 6 - Groundhog day step

This step you can repeat a few times. Twice is good, but you can do it 5x if you like. This is where you'll be creating more alcohol.

Add between a teaspoon and a tablespoon of sugar to each bottle (a teaspoon is fine). Cap the bottle and turn it over a few times to let the sugar dissolve. Uncap the bottle & replace the cheesecloth on top. You can add a tiny bit more yeast if you want to experiment, but this isn't necessary.

Step 7 - Cap it

Add a teaspoon of sugar (not a tablespoon) or less. This will be consumed and create carbonation in your ginger ale.

Cap the bottle and leave it for 2~5 days in a safe place in case it explodes. Do not refrigerate it yet. This is where you'll get the fizz.

Step 8 - Fridge time!

Put it in the fridge until you're ready to drink.

When drinking, add in some sugar or sugar syrup to sweeten it as the ginger ale will be very dry.

The quality of what you'll get above is going to vary, but the recipe above requires no special ingredients and everything can be obtained in any grocery store.

Step 9 - Post back

If you tried it, post back after your 7th or 8th glass! :D

Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

Renegade

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #53 on: July 11, 2014, 11:03:43 AM »
Looking for cheap snacks that aren't as horribly toxic as the ones you're probably eating now?

Renegade's Stupid Silly Awesome Snack Recipe!

Steamed baby potatoes taste awesome hot or cold.

Ingredients:

  • Baby potatoes

Step 1 - Steam the potatoes

Steam the potatoes. (40 min is good.)

Step 2 - Eat them

Eat them. (Salt & butter are optional.)


You might be surprised at how good potatoes taste when they are simply steamed. They make a great snack!

Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

mouser

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #54 on: July 11, 2014, 11:10:31 AM »
I'm a fan of normal gingerale soda, so i need to get my hands on some store-bought alcoholic gingerale and see if it tastes good enough to brew my own.

app103

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #55 on: July 11, 2014, 11:13:43 AM »
Steamed baby potatoes taste awesome hot or cold.

Little baby red potatoes, in a pressure cooker for about 7 minutes, then chilled. Eat them like apples. They are quite sweet.  :)

Renegade

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #56 on: July 11, 2014, 11:25:48 AM »
I'm a fan of normal gingerale soda, so i need to get my hands on some store-bought alcoholic gingerale and see if it tastes good enough to brew my own.

Dude... You are missing out. The stuff you get in the store is NOTHING like what you can do.

The recipe I posted above is kind of lame. It's very basic and really only for you to have fun. It can be improved upon a LOT. However, it's not so much about the taste as about the adventure. The above recipe can be tweaked easily to come up with a very nice ginger ale. Sub in a champagne yeast, etc., and you'll end up with some real beauty.
Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

Renegade

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #57 on: July 11, 2014, 11:26:48 AM »
Steamed baby potatoes taste awesome hot or cold.

Little baby red potatoes, in a pressure cooker for about 7 minutes, then chilled. Eat them like apples. They are quite sweet.  :)

Yup. That works too. Sub in yams and you're talking some serious candy! :D
Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

TaoPhoenix

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #58 on: July 11, 2014, 12:04:00 PM »
Heh I've been reading lots of "Star Trek TNG walkthroughs" so I'm full of comments (from the better episodes) about "added nice complexity" and all that.

So I shall take the Recipe Thread into new territory with a dark and murky one!

It's a paraphrase from a SciFi (Non-Trek) short story (whose exact title is escaping me at the moment - note to self check my anthologies).

It's a brilliant sideways show-not-tell about tough times in the gritty near future. You can vary it, and it goes something like this:

--------

Fried Rats

Ingredients:
2-5 rats
2-5 grams of salt

Instructions:
Make a fire out of street trash
Fry the rats to desired finish
Add the salt to taste

Serves 5-20 depending on the number of rats used.

-----------------

Insert your haunting minor key music here!

:tellme:

40hz

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #59 on: July 11, 2014, 02:12:55 PM »
Lately we've been enjoying something a friend introduced us to which she referred to as "how grown-ups eat watermelon."

1. Cube a medium sized seedless watermelon. Cubes should be about 1/2" - 3/4" square (i.e. big enough to be speared and stay on a fork.)

2. Put cubes in a large plastic salad bowl, sprinkle a generous handful of chopped fresh basil over the melon cubes, and (optional*) add about 2 cups of grape tomatoes (cut in half) to the mix.

3. Pour "a moderate quantity" (1/2 - 3/4 cup approx. and adjust to taste) of your favorite balsamic vinaigrette salad dressing* over all and mix gently so that everything is more or less evenly distributed.

4. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for an hour or two to let the flavors blend. (Especially good when left overnight.)

5. Remove from fridge, gently mix again and allow to warm up a bit. Salad should be served cool - but not too cold - for best flavor.

--------------------

Notes:

card.jpgDonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread

1. We've tried a few different readily available vinaigrettes and think Cardini's Light Balsamic Vinaigrette Dressing works best. At least so far. (No MSG and low fat to boot!)  8)

2. My GF likes the contrast of texture and flavors the watermelon/tomato combination provides. I find it distracting. Fortunately, the tomato flavor doesn't invade the watermelon all that much, so I just pick around them when I'm filling my dish. This is a win-win since I don't care for tomatoes in this particular dish - and my not taking any leaves more for my GF, who really does enjoy having them in there. ;D

3. Since we started doing it up this way, my GF and I have probably eaten more watermelon in the last few weeks than we have in the last 10 years. ;)
« Last Edit: July 11, 2014, 02:31:54 PM by 40hz »

Renegade

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #60 on: July 12, 2014, 01:16:13 AM »
2. My GF likes the contrast of texture and flavors the watermelon/tomato combination provides. I find it distracting. Fortunately, the tomato flavor doesn't invade the watermelon all that much, so I just pick around them when I'm filling my dish. This is a win-win since I don't care for tomatoes in this particular dish - and my not taking any leaves more for my GF, who really does enjoy having them in there. ;D

Heheh! I understand that very well. I don't particularly like dark chicken meat, but my wife loves it. It's a win-win.
Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

mouser

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #61 on: May 10, 2015, 06:14:04 PM »
One of my new favorite dishes.. Tastes so fresh and not overly oily:

ASIAN NOODLE BOWL WITH GINGER PEANUT DRESSING

http://minimalistbak...ger-peanut-dressing/

Screenshot - 5_10_2015 , 6_13_50 PM_thumb001.png

« Last Edit: September 01, 2015, 04:28:33 AM by mouser »

TaoPhoenix

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #62 on: September 01, 2015, 04:19:26 AM »

From App last night comes this sandwich:
Fresh Baked Turkey (that her local store makes daily), fresh baked roast beef, low salt ham, no salt swiss cheese on a whole wheat roll with romaine lettuce, tomato, onion, and ranch dressing.

My alt version will skip the tomato and onion, and I haven't decided on the bread but it might just be one of the healthy breads and (even since I don't need it yet but an experiment) one of the diabetic breads.

tomos

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #63 on: September 01, 2015, 11:38:30 AM »
This one is titled "Stupidly Simple Omelette" ;)

Get a good quality jar of pesto, doesnt really matter what it's made with.
I've been using:
pumpkin seed pesto / tomato pesto / wild garlic (Bärlauch) pesto

# add one spoonful of pesto to two large, or three medium, eggs per person (I havent tried this with large amounts of eggs, you may need to add less pesto).
# whisk.
# fry at low temperature, ideally with a good olive oil. When it's nicely set towards the sides, you could stick it under the grill for a minute or two to get the middle to set - then flip it, and give it another minute or two in the pan.

The intensity of the pesto makes for a really tasty omelette.
You can make a meal of this by adding cubed (cooked) potatoes and chopped (cooked) green beans.

An omelette with two or three eggs works well in my 18cm pan -- that's 7&1/8 inches (the base is about 13.5cm).
For two people, I prefer to make two small ones - but best experiment with your frying pan/s.

I have a couple of lovely carbon steel frying pans - that's iron that rusts, and *not* cast-iron. You can get them dirt cheap here (amazon.de), but the equivalent seems to be difficult to find on amazon.com
Great for omelettes, fried spuds, etc.
Tom

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #64 on: September 01, 2015, 11:48:06 AM »
You can get them dirt cheap here (amazon.de), but the equivalent seems to be difficult to find on amazon.com
Not at all.  There are many on amazon... just look up "carbon steel frying pans".  The one I have is from a local store, but I can also recommend these products that work well on them:

http://www.amazon.co...nmail/dp/B00FKBR1ZG/

http://www.amazon.co...dable/dp/B00UCLXH48/


tomos

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #65 on: September 01, 2015, 12:01:45 PM »
You can get them dirt cheap here (amazon.de), but the equivalent seems to be difficult to find on amazon.com
Not at all.  There are many on amazon... just look up "carbon steel frying pans".  The one I have is from a local store, but I can also recommend these products that work well on them:

http://www.amazon.co...nmail/dp/B00FKBR1ZG/

EDIT2// sorry wraith - I was confused by your links to cast-iron related products - yes, a search for "carbon steel frying pans" will get the same pans. //EDIT2

the ones I'm using are called crepe or omelette pans here - they are not cast iron - they have a relatively thin base and heat quickly (easy to overheat though).
Tom
« Last Edit: September 01, 2015, 12:13:36 PM by tomos »

wraith808

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Re: DonationCoder Recipe Sharing Thread
« Reply #66 on: September 01, 2015, 01:42:16 PM »
You can get them dirt cheap here (amazon.de), but the equivalent seems to be difficult to find on amazon.com
Not at all.  There are many on amazon... just look up "carbon steel frying pans".  The one I have is from a local store, but I can also recommend these products that work well on them:

http://www.amazon.co...nmail/dp/B00FKBR1ZG/

EDIT2// sorry wraith - I was confused by your links to cast-iron related products - yes, a search for "carbon steel frying pans" will get the same pans. //EDIT2

the ones I'm using are called crepe or omelette pans here - they are not cast iron - they have a relatively thin base and heat quickly (easy to overheat though).


Not sure what the edit was :)  But I was including those as they are really good on the carbon steel, so I was recommending them as you use them. :)