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Author Topic: ironshield antivirus  (Read 3607 times)

ironshieldav

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ironshield antivirus
« on: March 18, 2013, 03:40:44 AM »
The IronShield anti-virus software is projected to be the biggest in the market in one to two years. This competitive product is written with open source code, which was taken from the ClaimWin product. But, the IronShield further improves and truly guarantees you of your complete computer security.

Renegade

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2013, 06:38:12 AM »
Just FYI, there's a forum for announcing your products here.

Good luck with your project!

BTW - A link could be useful... ;)
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Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

40hz

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2013, 08:02:32 AM »
BTW - A link could be useful...

Agree. If you want me to look - provide a link. I generally won't do a search for something mentioned in a brief product announcement. And I'm not alone.
 :)

TaoPhoenix

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2013, 09:54:00 AM »
The IronShield anti-virus software is projected to be the biggest in the market in one to two years. This competitive product is written with open source code, which was taken from the ClaimWin product. But, the IronShield further improves and truly guarantees you of your complete computer security.

Hi there. Besides the "announce" thread, you simply need to do better than that for this crowd, especially on the topic of AntiVirus. What/ByWho is IronShield, what influences does it run off of, why is it better than 12 other AV programs, what is ClaimWin, and exactly what are you "guaranteeing"? (Guarantee is a word that too many marketers peel off whenever they feel like it. What exactly do we get back in the guarantee after IronShield kicks the bucket in three weeks flat?)


f0dder

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2013, 10:02:18 AM »
Given the kind of results google returns, this seems pretty fishy.
- carpe noctem

TaoPhoenix

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2013, 10:04:17 AM »
Given the kind of results google returns, this seems pretty fishy.


Sure, I didn't even go that route, I gave him the benefit of the doubt. But sure, in the age of the net, it's far harder for shady characters to play all sides of the fence because it's not like the wild west when you can change states and just re-post your shingle again 5 times. Word gets out.

40hz

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2013, 04:24:02 PM »
Given the kind of results google returns, this seems pretty fishy.


Yeah. I just did a goog. And the hits don't instill much confidence. (Who exactly will be developing this?)

What strikes me as interesting is how they can expect to make a commercial AV product out of this if it's based on ClamWin. ClamWin is released under GPLv2 and LGPLv2 so any derivative work would also be subject to the same licenses. Not to say you can't sell something that has a F/OSS license - but it's hard to see where the value-added would come in with something like this. Especially since your source would need to be shared back upon request and would likely just be incorporated back into ClamWin if the claimed benefit really did turn out as advertised.

Dunno. Seems a little weird to me.

Tinman57

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2013, 08:33:02 PM »
  And if your using Open Source Code, don't that open a channel for hackers to figure out how to bypass it?

40hz

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2013, 01:32:21 AM »
  And if your using Open Source Code, don't that open a channel for hackers to figure out how to bypass it?

That's part of an interesting debate in the world of computer security.

One school of thought says it would be a bigger risk being open. The other school says that attempting "security through obscurity" is a pipe dream. Because the only real workable security solution is something that can survive an attack despite being completely open and widely understood. It's almost a Darwinian philosophy - as in 'survival of the fittest.'

There appears to be a good bit of practical wisdom in an open approach since malware itself (especially the zero-day variety) depends heavily on obscurity to avoid detection. However, once identified, such threats are quickly analyzed, reverse engineered, and eliminated. Often within hours.

In some respects, when it comes to security (i.e encryption, anti-malware, etc.) the only products you can possibly trust completely are the "open" ones since  'black box' (or "FM" :mrgreen:) security apps can only be deemed as trustworthy as the people who create and distribute them. And there are plenty of bogus security apps out there.

It's a tough call deciding which philosophy is more correct. But so far, the 'open' approach to security seems to afford a greater degree of protection.

2009-8-5-Spy_vs_Spy_9432.jpg

One thing for sure - there's no rest for the wicked. Or the "good guys" for that matter. 8)

f0dder

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2013, 04:12:49 AM »
  And if your using Open Source Code, don't that open a channel for hackers to figure out how to bypass it?
It's somewhat easier to hunt for juicy bugs if you've got the source code - but there's some very powerful binary analysis programs available as well (though not to the general public).

At any rate, it's a moot point - both the Windows and Linux kernel have had stuff like 10-year outstanding local privilege escalation exploits, and you can be sure they still both do - just not (publicly) known yet. And closed vs. open doesn't matter that much, since there's serious money in malware these days. If it's there, they will find it.

Linux does have the advantage of getting bugs patched faster once they're found - but there's also been reeeeal oopsies like Debian getting rid of proper SSH randomization because a developer didn't understand Valgrind properly (why does a person like that deal with security-crucial code?)
- carpe noctem

Tinman57

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2013, 05:33:02 PM »
  Basically it just comes down to who codes the best and without shortcuts.  I've owned a lot of commercial programs that were very poorly coded and have some awesome open source programs....

40hz

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2013, 07:30:06 PM »
  Basically it just comes down to who codes the best and without shortcuts.  I've owned a lot of commercial programs that were very poorly coded and have some awesome open source programs....

+1. That's been my experience too.

40hz

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2013, 10:19:53 PM »
Linux does have the advantage of getting bugs patched faster once they're found - but there's also been reeeeal oopsies like Debian getting rid of proper SSH randomization because a developer didn't understand Valgrind properly (why does a person like that deal with security-crucial code?)

@f0dder - maybe you should ask the guys over at Cisco that question?

This from The Register

Quote
Cisco slip puts hardware at risk
Borg announces weak password feature

By Richard Chirgwin
Posted in Security, 20th March 2013 22:46 GMT


Cisco has issued a security advisory revealing that it mis-coded the implementation of a new password hashing algorithm.

Its “Type 4” password implementation was supposed to salt passwords and then run them through 1,000 iterations of SHA-256 for storage, following the Password-Based Key Derivation Function (PBKDF) version 2 described in RFC 2898.

In what Cisco calls an “implementation issue”, its engineers forgot to salt passwords, and set the SHA-256 iteration count to 1. As its advisory states: “This approach causes a Type 4 password to be less resilient to brute-force attacks than a Type 5 password of equivalent complexity.”

The problem was discovered by Philipp Schmidt and Jens Steube from the Hashcat project. Because of the weak protection, they were able to decode a hash that had been posted to inetpro.org, and as noted by Ars, enough information has leaked to permit “millions” of hashes to be cracked in hours, if anyone gets their hands on the stored hashes.

The vulnerability affects kit running Cisco IOS and Cisco IOS XE releases based on the Cisco IOS 15 code base, the advisory says, along with instructions for determining whether a user is running vulnerable code.

Adding insult to injury, the implementation of the broken Type 4 password also disabled the Type 5 hashing it replaced...

screwedpooch.jpgironshield antivirus


f0dder

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2013, 07:46:12 AM »
@f0dder - maybe you should ask the guys over at Cisco that question?
Yeah, saw that yesterday - efiin' insane.

Oh, and nice pic you chose to go along with the story :Thmbsup:
- carpe noctem

40hz

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2013, 05:05:53 PM »
@f0dder - maybe you should ask the guys over at Cisco that question?
Yeah, saw that yesterday - efiin' insane.

Oh, and nice pic you chose to go along with the story :Thmbsup:

Did the wording myself. Glad you liked it! ;D

(Also spent a while yesterday checking HW inventory lists to see which of my clients might be affected by it so I could put an advisory out.  :-\)

Stephen66515

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Re: ironshield antivirus
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2013, 05:14:24 PM »
Spambot post was spambot.

ironshieldav has been banned from DonationCoder.

The users post will be preserved as it has generates alternative conversation here.

If this was a mistake (however unlikely), please e-mail:
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