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Author Topic: A way to look at software design  (Read 1834 times)

40hz

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A way to look at software design
« on: January 16, 2013, 08:28:40 AM »
Although I can write basic, correct, and working code, I'm far from being a coder. I have, however, acquired a great deal of design experience over the years. And I subscribe to the notion by Don Koberg and Jim Bagnall that says: "Design is a process of making dreams come true."

Much has been written about the process of design since it's something that permeates much of what passes for "human" activity. But every so often somebody pens something short, sweet, and to the point that's worth thinking about. Mandy Brown, in a recent blog post, offered this brief essay for consideration:

Quote
Call and response
A reading note


Take three chairs—a traditional Shaker chair, an Eames’ plywood chair, and Frank Gehry’s aptly-named wiggle chair—and ask yourself: why do we have three completely different solutions for the same problem? Perhaps because they are not solutions so much as responses:

    "The products of design are more negotiations of issues and responses to problems than absolute, fixed solutions, and this provides plenty of space for different takes and perspectives. Grouping the chairs together makes it evident that each design is an attempt to fill the need of sitting seen through the lens of each designer’s disposition. Their responses are a negotiation of the problem with its context, and the designers are a part of that context." (Chimero, The Shape of Design, page 75)

So, rather than trying to solve a design problem, you can respond to it, bringing the full force of your experience and time and place to the fore. Turn that around, and it’s also a useful device for deciding what to spend your time on: does the work call out for someone like you?

Something to think about. 8)




Edvard

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Re: A way to look at software design
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2013, 12:55:45 PM »
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Perhaps because they are not solutions so much as responses
Spot. On.

kyrathaba

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Re: A way to look at software design
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2013, 08:31:35 PM »
Just so!

cranioscopical

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Re: A way to look at software design
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2013, 08:37:59 PM »
Work?  :o

wraith808

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Re: A way to look at software design
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2013, 09:11:52 PM »
Hmmm... in a lot of cases if you respond, you'll end up responding forever, and never address the underlying need.  I see what he's saying, but it seems a bit simplistic in any case when you're dealing with a changing environment.