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Author Topic: Places to learn how to program  (Read 10786 times)
mouser
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« on: April 22, 2006, 05:24:52 PM »

I'll start us out here but please post replies with your favorite forums, websites, etc.

Free Programming E-Books

Tutorials
« Last Edit: May 23, 2006, 10:02:03 AM by mouser » Logged
app103
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« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2006, 09:30:24 PM »

very strange...that second link...total rip of my list along with my comment on the one ruby book too  Angry
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mouser
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« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2006, 09:32:22 PM »

wtf  mad
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Bitwise
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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2006, 10:16:45 AM »

I've just finished a Ruby programming eBook (10 chapters plus lots of source code). It's all free and you can download it from: http://www.sapphiresteel....m/The-Little-Book-Of-Ruby

I hope some of you may find it useful.  smiley

best wishes
Huw
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mouser
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2006, 11:21:02 AM »

hi huw,
wow that was quick - looking forward to checking it out.

you really fell in love with ruby huh?

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Rover
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2006, 12:14:57 PM »

Nice little book.  I just browsed through, but it certainly looks nice and I will read it soon.

THANK YOU!  Thmbsup
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mouser
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« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2006, 12:09:05 PM »

Learning to Program by Alan Gauld - website tutorials
(mainly uses Python but dabbles in some other stuff)
Looks nice for beginners:

http://www.freenetpages.co.uk/hp/alan.gauld/

(found from digg)
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johnsmith16801
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« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2006, 01:03:27 PM »

This one is much better:
http://FreeComputerBooks.com

(1) It's very well catagorized, "Programming Languages", "Java and J2EE", "Computer Science","Web and Internet", "Databases", "Networking", "Microsoft", "Special Topics", WOW! I have seen any other free computer books site does the better job.

(2) It has a pattern search engine to bring the books you want right to you - not just page level search, it's item level search.

(3) It's rated #1 in Google - try to search "Free Computer Books" in Google to see what you get:
http://www.google.com/sea...ks&btnG=Google+Search

(4) It has more computer books than any other site - more than 3,000!!!

Most other free computer/programmong books likes (like mouser mentioned) just put all the links together, no categorization, no search engine.

This is definitely the best Free Computer Books site in the world!

Enjoy!
 
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Vurbal
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« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2014, 08:39:46 AM »

Yesterday I finally got around to checking out MIT's open courseware offerings and it seems pretty impressive. The courses run the gamut from 4 week intensive study course for CS students with little or no programming experience to graduate level.

Each course has a variety of materials including various combinations of lecture videos, lecture notes, assignments and exams (with or without solutions), online textbooks, and various other readings and resources. Since they obviously can't just give away copies of the numerous commercial textbooks they use there are suggestions for free alternatives. Also you can either access the materials online or download most of it in a zip archive.

Besides the courses from the EE/CS department, there's a wealth of related material from other departments from math and digital media to cognitive sciences - and just about anything in between.
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« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2014, 09:39:01 AM »

Udacity has some excellent university-level courses. I've done a few and found them well worth the investment in time.

Courses change with some regularity. Current catalog here.

All courses are available for free, but some courses also have a paid enrolment option for people who want more hand holding and a verified certificate of completion. This is from the FAQ:

Quote

What is a Udacity course like?

Udacity courses are highly interactive with activities, quizzes, and exercises interspersed between short videos and interviews with instructors and industry experts. You can watch the videos and try the quizzes as many times as you like without any penalties. The quizzes are a tool to help you learn.

Usually after a lesson, there will be a problem set with exercises for you to check if you have learned the material in that lesson. Just like with the quizzes, you can try them as many times as you like without penalty.

Udacity courses also include a project that you can add to your portfolio. Whether it is a blog, search engine, game, or app; Udacity will help you build something that demonstrates your skills to friends and employers.

And perhaps the best part of being enrolled in a Udacity course is access to your own personal Coach that will be there to support your success every step of the way.

What's the difference between enrolling in a course vs. viewing free courseware?

The difference between enrolling in a course versus viewing free courseware is like the difference between attending a great class versus simply reading a textbook.

The free courseware contains information, lectures, and auto-graded exercises. By enrolling in the class, you'll get project-planning advice and feedback on what you build to improve your portfolio. You'll also have a personal Coach throughout the course who will review your code, provide guidance on your project, answer questions about the class, and help keep you on track when you need it. After your final project review, you'll also go through an exit interview that Udacity will use to issue a verified certificate of accomplishment that is recognized by leading tech employers.

How much does it cost to enroll in a Udacity course?

All Udacity courses give you free access to our courseware, but for a select number of courses you can enroll in the full course experience. This gives you access to projects, code-review and feedback, a personal Coach, and verified certificates.

The price varies depending on the course. All prices are given per month. You can find the price on the Course Overview page along with an estimate for how long the course will take to complete.

I never bothered with enrolling since I prefer independent study and didn't need coaching for the courses I took. But it is nice to know that additional one-on-one help is available if you want or need it. And a verified certificate may also be important to some people if working for a company (and yes, there are still a few left) that reimburses employees for furthering their professional education. Such companies usually require some proof of successful course completion before they'll cut a check.

Coursera also offers a good selection (~100 ) free CompSci courses, some with an optional (for a fee) certificate. I haven't taken any of their computer related courses. But the business courses I took from them were quite good. Highly recommended.
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Vurbal
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« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2014, 10:05:20 AM »

Thanks for the Coursera link. I had been trying to figure out where Stanford's free CS courses were available besides iTunesU.
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.
- Groucho Marx

Follow the path of the unsafe, independent thinker. Expose your ideas to the danger of controversy. Speak your mind and fear less the label of ''crackpot'' than the stigma of conformity.
- Thomas J. Watson, Sr

It's not rocket surgery.
- Me


I recommend reading through my Bio before responding to any of my posts. It could save both of us a lot of time and frustration.
40hz
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« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2014, 12:47:04 PM »

Thanks for the Coursera link. I had been trying to figure out where Stanford's free CS courses were available besides iTunesU.


@V - glad to be of assistance. I love this trend in education. I've been like a kid in a candy store since MOOCs started taking off. I'm never happy unless I'm studying something. Life Long Learner, y'know? smiley



Coursera and NovoEd are the two places that handle most of Stanford MOOCs.

Stanford's portal is here.

A couple of good aggregation sites to look for these sorts of courses are Academic Earth and Class Central. If it's available, it's probably listed on one or the other.

 Thmbsup
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wraith808
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« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2014, 05:10:12 PM »

I learned about Code School through their iOS Kickstarter.

Compilr is also pretty cool.  I use it for the ide for code snippets- like Koding.com.
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