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Author Topic: Is there a non-Schwartzenegger Terminator in your future?  (Read 1237 times)

40hz

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Is there a non-Schwartzenegger Terminator in your future?
« on: September 07, 2012, 09:54:21 AM »
This just posted over on MAKE:



Quote
Boston Dynamic’s Cheetah Robot Can Now Outrun Usain Bolt
By Eric Weinhoffer, 2012/09/06 @ 3:30 pm

This is the latest video from Boston Dynamics, the company famous for creating the dynamically stable quadruped Big Dog. Just six months ago, we saw this Cheetah robot run at 18mph, crushing the previous speed record of 13.1mph, which was set at MIT in 1989. This time, it’s running at 28.3mph; quick enough, in fact, to overtake sprinter Usain Bolt.

Ok...so it's not tether-free or self-contained. Yet. But it's only a matter of time...

I can imagine a near future scenario where the battlefields will start seeing real versions of Phillip K. Dick's small battle robots called  "Claws" in his 1953 post-nuclear apocalypse short story The Second Variety. If you haven't read it yet, you should. It's a great story. (Available to read or download free from The Gutenberg Project - link here.)

read excerpt here
Quote
The Russian soldier made his way nervously up the ragged side of the hill, holding his gun ready. He glanced around him, licking his dry lips, his face set. From time to time he reached up a gloved hand and wiped perspiration from his neck, pushing down his coat collar.

Eric turned to Corporal Leone. “Want him? Or can I have him?” He adjusted the view sight so the Russian’s features squarely filled the glass, the lines cutting across his hard, somber features.

Leone considered. The Russian was close, moving rapidly, almost running. “Don’t fire. Wait.” Leone tensed. “I don’t think we’re needed.”

The Russian increased his pace, kicking ash and piles of debris out of his way. He reached the top of the hill and stopped, panting, staring around him. The sky was overcast, drifting clouds of gray particles. Bare trunks of trees jutted up occasionally; the ground was level and bare, rubble-strewn, with the ruins of buildings standing out here and there like yellowing skulls.

The Russian was uneasy. He knew something was wrong. He started down the hill. Now he was only a few paces from the bunker. Eric was getting fidgety. He played with his pistol, glancing at Leone.

“Don’t worry,” Leone said. “He won’t get here. They’ll take care of him.”

“Are you sure? He’s got damn far.”

“They hang around close to the bunker. He’s getting into the bad part. Get set!”

The Russian began to hurry, sliding down the hill, his boots sinking into the heaps of gray ash, trying to keep his gun up. He stopped for a moment, lifting his fieldglasses to his face.

“He’s looking right at us,” Eric said.

The Russian came on. They could see his eyes, like two blue stones. His mouth was open a little. He needed a shave; his chin was stubbled. On one bony cheek was a square of tape, showing blue at the edge. A fungoid spot. His coat was muddy and torn. One glove was missing. As he ran his belt counter bounced up and down against him.

Leone touched Eric’s arm. “Here one comes.”

Across the ground something small and metallic came, flashing in the dull sunlight of mid-day. A metal sphere. It raced up the hill after the Russian, its treads flying. It was small, one of the baby ones. Its claws were out, two razor projections spinning in a blur of white steel. The Russian heard it. He turned instantly,  firing. The sphere dissolved into particles. But already a second had emerged and was following the first. The Russian fired again.

A third sphere leaped up the Russian’s leg, clicking and whirring. It jumped to the shoulder. The spinning blades disappeared into the Russian’s throat.

Eric relaxed. “Well, that’s that. God, those damn things give me the creeps. Sometimes I think we were better off before.”

“If we hadn’t invented them, they would have.” Leone lit a cigarette shakily. “I wonder why a Russian would come all this way alone. I didn’t see anyone covering him.”

Lt. Scott came slipping up the tunnel, into the bunker. “What happened? Something entered the screen.”

“An Ivan.”

“Just one?”

Eric brought the view screen around. Scott peered into it. Now there were numerous metal spheres crawling over the prostrate body, dull metal globes clicking and whirring, sawing up the Russian into small parts to be carried away.

“What a lot of claws,” Scott murmured.

“They come like flies. Not much game for them any more.”

Scott pushed the sight away, disgusted. “Like flies. I wonder why he was out there. They know we have claws all around.”

A larger robot had joined the smaller spheres. It was directing operations, a long blunt tube with projecting eyepieces. There was not much left of the soldier. What remained was being brought down the hillside by the host of claws.

“Sir,” Leone said. “If it’s all right, I’d like to go out there and take a look at him.”

“Why?”

“Maybe he came with something.”

Scott considered. He shrugged. “All right. But be careful.”

“I have my tab.” Leone patted the metal band at his wrist. “I’ll be out of bounds.”


 8)

------------

Addendum: There was a fairly decent movie version made of the The Second Variety in 1995 called Screamers starring Peter Weller. Although the plot details were reworked, and the political scenarios updated, it kept very close to the original story. Recommended. :up:

Here's the trailer:



 :tellme:
« Last Edit: September 07, 2012, 10:02:07 AM by 40hz »

J-Mac

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Re: Is there a non-Schwartzenegger Terminator in your future?
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2012, 11:07:17 AM »
Love Screamers! Great flick.   8)

Jim

Oh, and I do remember Big Dog - the video of it running up a hill. Scary bugger.

Renegade

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Re: Is there a non-Schwartzenegger Terminator in your future?
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2012, 11:56:01 AM »
DARPA - You don't see mad scientists on the streets, because they're all over here~! :P

Yeah... Not something that I can see not being used for anything other than being a weapon.  :mad:

But it is really cool~! :D
Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

Deozaan

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Re: Is there a non-Schwartzenegger Terminator in your future?
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2012, 01:31:05 PM »
I can imagine a near future scenario where the battlefields will start seeing real versions of Phillip K. Dick's small battle robots called  "Claws" in his 1953 post-nuclear apocalypse short story The Second Variety. If you haven't read it yet, you should. It's a great story. (Available to read or download free from The Gutenberg Project - link here.)

Thanks for the link. I just read it. :Thmbsup:


40hz

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Re: Is there a non-Schwartzenegger Terminator in your future?
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2012, 04:59:58 PM »
I can imagine a near future scenario where the battlefields will start seeing real versions of Phillip K. Dick's small battle robots called  "Claws" in his 1953 post-nuclear apocalypse short story The Second Variety. If you haven't read it yet, you should. It's a great story. (Available to read or download free from The Gutenberg Project - link here.)

Thanks for the link. I just read it. :Thmbsup:

Glad you liked. Phillip K. Dick was awesome. Few ever hit as many high notes as he did in a career that spanned 44 novels and at least 120 short stories in the 53 all too brief years he lived. His influence is still being felt 30 years later.

200px-PhilipDick.jpg
          Phillip K.Dick
           1928 - 1982