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Author Topic: Who inherits your iTunes library?  (Read 2108 times)


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Who inherits your iTunes library?
« on: August 25, 2012, 09:31:44 PM »
A very interesting article:


Many of us will accumulate vast libraries of digital books and music over the course of our lifetimes. But when we die, our collections of words and music may expire with us.

Someone who owned 10,000 hardcover books and the same number of vinyl records could bequeath them to descendants, but legal experts say passing on iTunes and Kindle libraries would be much more complicated.

And one’s heirs stand to lose huge sums of money. “I find it hard to imagine a situation where a family would be OK with losing a collection of 10,000 books and songs,” says Evan Carroll, co-author of “Your Digital Afterlife.” “Legally dividing one account among several heirs would also be extremely difficult.”

Part of the problem is that with digital content, one doesn’t have the same rights as with print books and CDs. Customers own a license to use the digital files—but they don’t actually own them.

Apple and Amazon.com grant “nontransferable” rights to use content, so if you buy the complete works of the Beatles on iTunes, you cannot give the White Album to your son and Abbey Road to your daughter.


Here’s how it works: Goldman will sell his software for $150 directly to estate planners to store and manage digital accounts and passwords. And, while there are other online safe-deposit boxes like AssetLock and ExecutorSource that already do that, Goldman says his software contains instructions to create a legal trust for accounts. “Having access to digital content and having the legal right to use it are two totally different things,” he says.

The simpler alternative is to just use your loved one’s devices and accounts after they’re gone—as long as you have the right passwords.


etc. etc.

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Re: Who inherits your iTunes library?
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2012, 11:30:33 PM »
What happens once we are able to telepathically transmit information from my brain directly into your brain?  If a third person standing by intercepts the unencrypted transfer of brain info, is that illegal?  Is it really worth being illegal once it's that easy sending things back and forth?  Doesn't the fact that it's so freaking easy at some point matter?


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Re: Who inherits your iTunes library?
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2012, 12:44:39 AM »
What superboyac is thinking is actually my idea and I have patent on that. I wonder for how much I am supposed to sue superboyac.  :P